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Gamification
Nicholas Mikic
Gamification
By using the same game design methodologies as game designers,
can we make brands more addictive?
More spec...
The gaming revolution
Before the gaming revolution we knew where we stood…
Gamers were young adult males who were anti-s...
Then this happened
Nowadays, your typical gamer is...
Average age: 32
47% female
76% of gamers over 18
19% aged over 51
The
average
household
71% have 2
or more
gamers
87% have 3
or more
screens
98% with
children
have games
63% use a
console ...
The gaming industry at a glance
3 billion hours per week spent playing games globally
1 in 3 people online play social /...
Nike case study
How can Nike sell more running shoes, without:
 Reducing prices (reduces margins)
 Using promotions and...
Nike+
A small device (which runners pay for) is placed in their shoe and
tracks every step they take
It syncs back to th...
Nike+
The data allows runners to:
 Track their performance over time
 Map their runs and compare different runs
 Compe...
From a branding / market research
perspective
Nike have a direct line of communication to 8 million customers
They have ...
The science of fun
Four types of fun
Challenging fun
• Objectives
• Strategic
• Obstacles
• Rewards
• Levels
Easy fun
• Adventure
• Discovery...
Reward
structures
Points
Leader
boards
Virtual
currency
Levels &
progression
Missions &
quests
Badges &
trophies
Social
me...
Constant near goal completion
Some more examples…
ABC Reading Eggs
Coles self-checkout
Implications for researchers
and strategists
Market Research & Gamification
Understand
• Segmenting customers by gaming preferences
• Understanding the brand fit of di...
Engagement
Data
Research /
analysis
Strategic
insights
Gaming
Using Gamification as Strategists
•Rewarding customer loyalty and
engagement
•Direct marketing channel for promos
and spec...
Questions?
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
Gamification internal
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Gamification internal

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Gamification internal

  1. 1. Gamification Nicholas Mikic
  2. 2. Gamification By using the same game design methodologies as game designers, can we make brands more addictive? More specifically - “Can we make the engagement with a brand addictive in the same way that games are addictive?”
  3. 3. The gaming revolution Before the gaming revolution we knew where we stood… Gamers were young adult males who were anti-social, ate pizza, drank Coke by the BIG bottle and had no life… or perhaps kids even?
  4. 4. Then this happened
  5. 5. Nowadays, your typical gamer is... Average age: 32 47% female 76% of gamers over 18 19% aged over 51
  6. 6. The average household 71% have 2 or more gamers 87% have 3 or more screens 98% with children have games 63% use a console for games 47% use a mobile for games 26% use a tablet for games
  7. 7. The gaming industry at a glance 3 billion hours per week spent playing games globally 1 in 3 people online play social / casual games 80% of app store revenue goes to mobile games Tablet owners spend 67% of their time playing games Gaming industry ($56B) is 2x bigger than the music industry ($26B)
  8. 8. Nike case study How can Nike sell more running shoes, without:  Reducing prices (reduces margins)  Using promotions and sales (expensive and reduces margins)  Offering tangible rewards (such as traditional loyalty programme – expensive to operate and fulfill, and once again reduces margins)
  9. 9. Nike+ A small device (which runners pay for) is placed in their shoe and tracks every step they take It syncs back to their iPhone/iPod and a central website
  10. 10. Nike+ The data allows runners to:  Track their performance over time  Map their runs and compare different runs  Compete with themselves  Find people of a similar ability and race with them  Compete with friends over Facebook  Set goals (and have goals set for you to improve)  Progress through a series of levels based on activity and performance All of which you might do in a game…
  11. 11. From a branding / market research perspective Nike have a direct line of communication to 8 million customers They have more behavioural data than ever before And they’re continuing to grow…
  12. 12. The science of fun
  13. 13. Four types of fun Challenging fun • Objectives • Strategic • Obstacles • Rewards • Levels Easy fun • Adventure • Discovery • Exploration • Mystery • Experience People fun • Cooperation • Competition • Collaboration • Networking • Community Creative fun • Self-expression • Personalisation • Individuality • Avatars • Choice
  14. 14. Reward structures Points Leader boards Virtual currency Levels & progression Missions & quests Badges & trophies Social media integration
  15. 15. Constant near goal completion
  16. 16. Some more examples…
  17. 17. ABC Reading Eggs
  18. 18. Coles self-checkout
  19. 19. Implications for researchers and strategists
  20. 20. Market Research & Gamification Understand • Segmenting customers by gaming preferences • Understanding the brand fit of different types of games Enhance • Using gaming elements to enhance the research process • Implementing reward structures Data mining • Collecting large scale behavioural data • Collect data on hard to reach segments
  21. 21. Engagement Data Research / analysis Strategic insights Gaming
  22. 22. Using Gamification as Strategists •Rewarding customer loyalty and engagement •Direct marketing channel for promos and special offers •Using consumer irrationality as a driver to playing games •Understanding irrationality through Gamification •Employing behaviour change strategies through gaming •Raising awareness on social and economic issues •Shifting brand perceptions and attitudes •Understanding and attracting new customer segments Brand positioning Social implications Customer rewards Behavioural Economics
  23. 23. Questions?

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