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Generation myth report

Building on the success of the 2007 study, AIM SA and Square Holes explored broader issues in relation to the needs of differing groups of workers. The particular relevance of this study is the ageing workforce. March 2009

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Generation myth report

  1. 1. M yth M yth The Generation Gap Market Research Authors & Project Team: Victoria Carbone Silvia Azmitia Jason Dunstone Data collected: March 2009 Square Holes in partnership with Australian Institute of Management SA
  2. 2. Victoria Carbone has a background in anthropology and has directed ethnographic research for a number of key clients. During her time at Square Holes she has gained much experience in data analysis and report writing. She has written reports for the following clients BreastScreen SA, Department of Health, Fantastic Snacks, Adam Internet, Alfred James, Business SA, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, Centennial Park, Chemplus, Hamilton Labs, Magic Millions, Rugby 7s and WorkCoverSA. Victoria holds qualifications in Anthropology. Contribution to Generation Myth: project manager, analysis and co-author. Silvia Azmitia has held branding and management positions at Red Bull and Grey Interactive in South America. She joined Square Holes with extensive experience in strategic use of research and consumer insight, project management, guerrilla marketing, niche marketing and online marketing. Silvia holds a Bachelor of Advertising and Public Relations, and a Masters in Communications. Contribution to Generation Myth: account manager and editor. Jason Dunstone is the Founder and Managing Director of Square Holes. He started his career in market research at TNS Melbourne in the early 1990s and has since built an impressive list of corporate and government clients. His corporate client base has included Telstra, Ford, Coopers Brewery, SANFL and Hamilton Laboratories. Jason founded Square Holes in late 2004, bored with traditional research and with a hunger for change. Square Holes has grown to a strong research team with a passion for supporting great branding, advertising and digital. Jason holds qualifications in Economics and Commerce. Contribution to Generation Myth: project director and strategic input. Square Holes is a progressive market research agency with a passion for supporting great branding, advertising and digital. Based on a solid and reliable evidence base and marketing intelligence [through surveys, focus groups and other approaches] we provide: ‘Illumination’ to inspire and guide ‘Testing’ for confidence and direction ‘Monitoring’ of impact and opportunities For more information visit our website http://www.squareholes.com
  3. 3. This report is provided for information purposes only. Except to the extent permitted by law, no part of this report may be reproduced, published, adapted, distributed, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted or communicated for any commercial purpose [including education or training] without the prior written approval of Square Holes Pty Ltd. Any reference to the research findings contained in this report should state 'Source: report on Generation Myth Study [2009] by Squares Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA' [Report]. Overview.............................................................................................1 Conclusions.........................................................................................3 Focus Group Findings..........................................................................9 Perceived ideal team......................................................................... 11 Strengths of workplace...................................................................... 12 Weaknesses of workplace.................................................................. 13 Workplace challenges........................................................................ 14 Working together.............................................................................. 15 Survey Findings ................................................................................16 Workplace Segmentations..................................................................... 17 Segment 1: Dynamo [18%]............................................................... 18 Segment 2: Gimme [21%] ................................................................ 19 Segment 3: Plodders [21%] .............................................................. 20 Segment 4: Made it [40%] ................................................................ 21 Job Satisfaction .................................................................................... 22 Overall Job Satisfaction ..................................................................... 22 Likelihood of working for same employer............................................ 23 Job security...................................................................................... 24 Likelihood of finding another similar job ............................................. 25 Immediate Team .................................................................................. 26 Profile of direct manager ................................................................... 26 Work well with direct manager .......................................................... 27 Profile of team.................................................................................. 28 Work well with team ......................................................................... 29 Person you work ‘best with’............................................................... 30 Profile of person you work ‘best with’................................................. 31 Person you do not work so well with.................................................. 32 Profile of person you do not work so well with.................................... 33 Age of team ..................................................................................... 34 Important Workplace Aspects................................................................ 35 Employer offerings................................................................................ 36 Training and Development .................................................................... 38 Responsibility and Challenge ................................................................. 40 Employer Image................................................................................... 42 Work-Life Balance................................................................................. 44 Management ........................................................................................ 46 Work Environment................................................................................ 48 Uniqueness .......................................................................................... 50 Working in South Australia .................................................................... 51 Working outside South Australia ........................................................ 52 Employee Profile...............................................................................53 Business Profile ................................................................................57 Appendices .......................................................................................59 Methodology ........................................................................................ 71 Questionnaire....................................................................................... 74
  4. 4. 1 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Overview In the second half of 2007, Square Holes worked with the Australian Institute of Management of South Australia and SA Great to conduct research into the attitudes and needs of younger workers [aged under 40]. The workplace retention research project commenced with a series of targeted focus groups, to allow some initial brainstorming of the topic amongst young people employed in professional services, science and technology and trades. The second stage of the project was an internet survey of 800 South Australian employees aged under 40. This included 181 expatriate South Australians currently working interstate or overseas. The survey was open to all levels of an organisation, ranging from administration to upper management. It attracted open and honest feedback from a wide selection of young people. AIM SA, SA Great and Square Holes were thrilled with the response the survey generated, and are appreciative of the enthusiastic support. Those involved in the research were invited to attend a cocktail function on the 15th of October 2007 to hear the preliminary findings first hand and to offer additional feedback. The results of the survey were presented at a business luncheon on the 31st of October 2007 at the Hyatt Regency Ballroom in Adelaide. Building on the success of the 2007 study, AIM SA and Square Holes explored broader issues in relation to the needs of differing groups of workers. The particular relevance of this study is the ageing workforce. This report presents the findings of this second project. Other issues include … 1. Issues surrounding older workers and their impact on the workforce 2. Considering the issues from the perspectives of both the employer [organisation] and employee [individuals] 3. Investigating some of the impediments [both perceived and real] to the employment of older workers 4. Investigating the attitudes of individuals with regard to older workers in the workforce
  5. 5. 2 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Three focus groups were conducted among members of AIM SA during October 2008. The group composition was as follows... 1. 20-39 year olds 2. 40-55 year olds 3. 56+ year olds An online survey was conducted from the 19th of February to the 5th of March 2009 using the AIM database to administer an insightful study of workplace culture. In this study the approach of cluster analysis was employed to define four unique groups of employees and managers [i.e. identical people within, yet unique between the groups, how their attitudes, behaviours and needs differ.] This allows for a clear analysis of the types of employees, their needs and their differences particularly amongst older and younger employees. Questions explored the barriers in employing older staff and clear directions for dealing with an ageing workforce. “This research will look to expand on this previous work and provide South Australian managers and leaders with relevant and important information on issues surrounding South Australia's ageing workforce.” Quantitative Sample Overview Sample achieved 1053 Sample error +/- 3% Questionnaire length 15 minutes Collection Dates 15th Feb – 5th May 2009
  6. 6. 3 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Conclusions A reflection on the 2007 Gen X & Y research Without question the biggest challenge facing employers is how to attract and retain good staff. While some research has been previously conducted, much of this lacks strategic focus on deep insight and valuable actionable directions for employers. The 2007 research conducted by Square Holes in collaboration with SA Great and the Australian Institute of Management SA had a focus on Generation X and Y employees aged under 40. A copy of the report can be downloaded from... http://www.aimsa.com.au Issues explored included aspects which are desired and demanded from employers. Correlation and other analysis was conducted to reveal the key drivers to attracting and retaining good staff. Five key messages for employers emerged, and are listed to the left. A great deal of interest was attracted from the research. With this some discussion and curiosity surfaced as to the attitudes of employees beyond the aged of 40. From this, Square Holes and the AIM [SA] are again collaborating to delve deeper into the attitudes, needs and desires of workers to provide insights and directions for employers. Key findings... 1. Management culture is the area of greatest weakness yet it has the strongest impact on overall job satisfaction and retention.   2. Younger South Australian employees and expatriate South Australians working elsewhere believe that management needs to take a long hard look at themselves and take more responsibility in attracting and retain the best.   3. Employees are prepared to wait for financial and other rewards of success, yet are highly confident and will leave employers unwilling to nurture and provide future opportunity for advancement and more responsibility.   4. Adequate investment in retaining quality younger employees is important. It's not just a job or about the money. With job satisfaction not directly linked with loyalty, the strategic focus should be on minimising the churn.   5. Strategic focus on the employer's company image is important. While this did not emerge as one of the top areas impacting job satisfaction, it did have the second largest impact on staff loyalty.
  7. 7. 4 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA So, now for the 2009 research The approach adopted in 2009 was identical to that of the 2007 study. A series of focus groups [3] were conducted in October 2008 followed with, the core of the study, an online survey of 1,053 South Australian workers in February 2009. Three focus groups were moderated by Jason Dunstone comprising of 20- 39 year olds; 40-55 year olds; and 56+ year olds. It was interesting to note some clear differences between the groups. Of particular note was the view that a successful workplace was more about psychographics than demographics. The older two groups strongly emphasised this point. They typically disputed the idea that differing age groups may have issues working together. From this key insight, emerged the challenge of how employers can build a positive culture and attract and retain people with complimentary psychographics. As outlined in the body of the full report, Square Holes has explored details of the attitudes of workers and how employers can develop an attractive workplace. An analysis of how differing age groups compare, including the needs of older 60+ year old employees is featured within the report. Also revealed as part of this research are four unique segments of employees. While there are an overarching set of expectations of all workers, including trust, respect and communication, the four segments revealed [via the statistical technique cluster analysis] are as follows: DYNAMO  [18%]           GIMME [21%] MADE IT [40%] PLODDERS [21%] A summary of the segments follow and are detailed in the body of the full report, in short the segments are as follows: 1. Dynamo: The happiest, most loyal and secure employees. They are typically females who want success in their careers and work well with management. 2. Gimme: Expect to be provided with all the perks, yet, they are the least loyal and are least likely to work well with direct management. 3. Plodders: They have been employed for as long as ‘made it’ employees but have not achieved the same successes. 4. Made it: Typically comprise employees which have found success and contentment in their careers. They are less superficial and are less likely to want company perks.
  8. 8. 5 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA What makes a good work place? It is interesting to reflect on the key factors of importance for workers. Strong management was a unanimous demand of all employees irrespective of age. This is consistent with the 2007 research. Of the 95 factors tested, the top 5 across age and segments which are important in attracting and retaining employees include: 1. Trust and respect in your abilities 2. Respectful management 3. Trustworthy management 4. Strong communications skills 5. Management has reasonable standards for output and workload On the opposite end of the scale, the least important across age and segments were as follows: 91. No fixed office / mobile office 92. Gift vouchers 93. Gym membership 94. Working outside 95. Equity or shares in the business [now, not in the future] Also interesting, 64 of the 95 factors were viewed as important amongst the majority in each of the four segments. Major differences emerged primarily amongst the 20 factors noted below. Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Paid paternity leave 92% 94% 10% 32% Paid maternity leave 96% 95% 15% 41% Workplace has a child care centre or minding service 48% 75% 9% 14% Car allowance 27% 85% 56% 33% Events for staff and families 76% 83% 63% 28% Relaxation areas 81% 79% 78% 29% Vehicle lease paid by employer 18% 70% 43% 34% An active social club 61% 70% 51% 18% Ability to purchase equity of shares in the business in the future 16% 66% 45% 17% Offers break-away or creative areas for staff 87% 88% 80% 38% Visible and well known employer amongst most Australians 73% 85% 86% 37% Medical insurance paid 23% 72% 56% 23% Company paid credit card 17% 66% 49% 23% A partitioned area 60% 76% 62% 29% Discount programs 34% 62% 49% 15% Equity or shares in the business now 19% 57% 38% 15% Marketing and advertising that appeals to them 62% 79% 79% 36% Relocation allowance 54% 80% 57% 38% Reimbursement expense account 57% 91% 79% 51% Payment for overtime and additional hours worked 75% 83% 57% 44%
  9. 9. 6 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Satisfaction, loyalty and security It is interesting that job satisfaction does not equate to job loyalty, this is consistent with the 2007 research. Nine in ten of the employees surveyed indicated that they were happy with their job, while around two in three indicated job loyalty [likely to be with same employer in three years]. While the level of satisfaction and loyalty is generally consistent across the age and segment groups there are some notable differences. This includes a larger proportion of employees aged 60+ being happy and smaller proportion loyal this may be influenced by their plans to retire. The most loyal age group are those 40-59 years old; whilst ‘Gimme’ employees are the least loyal of the four segments. Also notable is the high level of job security across the age and segment groups, particularly given that the survey was conducted in early 2009 at a time of much economic pessimism in the media. The majority still considered their job security was high, slightly lower within the 60+ age group. Most also believed that they would be likely to find a similar job if they were to lose their current job. While there was a general consistency across the four segments, there were differences observed within age groups. Perhaps not surprisingly, employees under 40 were more optimistic than those aged 60+. Happy Loyal * Secure in current job Likely to find similar job Total 87% 64% 89% 80% Age groups Under 40 86% 57% 92% 84% 40-59 88% 69% 90% 75% 60+ 96% 52% 80% 64% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 92% 66% 91% 83% ‘Gimme’ 83% 56% 88% 78% ‘Plodders’ 87% 67% 87% 82% ‘Made it’ 88% 66% 90% 77% *Loyal = likely to be with same employer in three years One in twenty employees are extremely happy & extremely likely to be with their employer in 3 years time The percentage of employees who are extremely happy and extremely likely to be with their employers in 3 years time was similar across age [<40 7%; 40-59 10%; 60+ 8%] and the four segments, although the Made it was slightly higher [Dynamo 7%; Gimme 7%; Plodders 7%; Made it 11%].
  10. 10. 7 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA The team Direct managers are typically males aged 40-59. Most admit to working well with their direct managers [91%], with this level highest amongst the Dynamo segment [93%] and lowest amongst the ‘Gimme’ employees [87%]. Half [45%] do not work so well with management. Perhaps at least partially related, males aged 40-59 are those that others work worst with. They are likely to be managers with conflicting work ethic, poor communication skills and moody / argumentative dispositions. There is an almost universal view that people work well within their teams [98%]. These teams represent a mix of ages; although members aged 60+ were rare [6%]. Age was reported to have little influence on who they worked best with. Most importantly, a similar work ethic was the main factor. Demographics of... Under 40 40-59 60+ Female Male Person work best with 51% 47% 2% 48% 52% Person work worst with 42% 53% 5% 40% 60% Direct Manager 23% 72% 6% 29% 71% Team 47% 46% 6% 49% 51% Person work ‘best with’: 25% 19% 14% 11% Similar work ethic Similar age 6% Mutual respect Similar interests/personality Communication skills Person work ‘worst with’: 16% 12% 12% 10% Conflicting work ethic Age 3% Different personalities’ Poor communicator Moody / argumentative 8% 7% Not a team player   Rude / arrogant When asked to describe their current and ideal team member age, the current team age ranged from 27-53, with the ideal age ranging from 25- 48. The ideal manager was believed to be aged 34-51. This was generally consistent across all age groups.
  11. 11. 8 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA What are the key messages for SA employers? 1. Not all employees are the same, yet it’s not about age The generation gap does not exist in the workplace as far as this research is concerned. Many respondents were even angry at an insinuation of an age difference. There are four unique segments of employees, yet age and other demographics are of little, if any, relevance. While the four segments revealed are very interesting in terms of unique psychographics and attitudes, they are compiled of people with diverse demographics. Similar work ethics are at the core of a strong workplace. 2. Management should stop shifting the blame The 2007 research concluded that “management needs to take a long hard look at themselves” and that “attempting to shift the blame is viewed as unacceptable”. A consistent response emerged in 2009. While other factors may come in to play, the single biggest reason for staff departures from an employer was poor management. Universally across all segments, a respectful and trustworthy management were demanded in addition to a reasonable standard of output and workload. 3. Communication with staff is a weakness Only second to strong management was the need for good staff communication. This was viewed as essential across all employees, yet typically a weakness across the research. Even the happy and loyal staff often viewed communication with staff as a weakness. At times they were not kept informed of what was occurring and other times considered the lack of communication linked to disrespect. 4. Job satisfaction does not equal loyalty Even the happiest staff are not necessarily loyal. There is little difference between age groups and segments of employees with regard to loyalty. While 87% of employees are happy, 64% are likely to be with the same employer in three years. Consistent with the 2007 research amongst Gen X and Y staff, the 2009 research of all employees revealed only around 5- 10% of employees as extremely happy and extremely likely to be with the same employer in three years. In saying this, it does appear that staff aged 40-59 are slightly more loyal. Staff aged 60+ appear to be the least loyal, although this could at least partly be attributed to a lower level of perceived job security and retirement plans. 5. Older staff are not that different Staff aged 60+ appear to be the least loyal, although this could at least partly be attributed to a lower level of perceived job security. Most have an enthusiastic attitude to work and are not dissimilar to younger employees. They are often seeking professional development and challenges as are other employees. For many, they now have an invigorated relationship to work and may be seeking a second, third or subsequent career change. There is generally an eagerness to work within a team of differing ages. They prefer managers aged 38-60.
  12. 12. 9 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Focus Group Findings
  13. 13. 10 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA On Tuesday, 14th of October 2008 members of AIM, including employers and employees discussed their work environments, team strengths and weaknesses, the correlations between psychographics and generations and the challenges of people in each age group [from Generation Ys to Baby Boomers] in three focus groups. The three groups consisted of: 1. 20-39 year olds 2. 40-55 year olds 3. 56+ year olds Clear differences were observed between the three groups. Of particular note was the view that psychographics rather than demographics were consistently viewed as the key to a successful workplace. In the later two groups [40-55; 56+] there was a degree of disbelief and even anger that people of differing age groups may have issues working together. The challenge from the initial focus group discussions is how to build a positive culture and attract and retain people with appropriate psychographics …. But, how do employers achieve this?
  14. 14. 11 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Perceived ideal team The overriding image of an ideal team is one that is fun, organised and has a mix of skills. Listed below are other aspects that are perceived to make up an ideal team. Under 40 yrs: People on the same wave length Not regimented More freedom Ongoing training Willingness to look outside the square Diverse Innovative Safe place for discussion 40-55 yrs: Equal contribution by all people Willing to learn new things Multi-skilled Right attitude ‘The Right Fit’ Willingness to work as a team Maturity of employees Interested in company 56+ yrs: Mix of skills Right attitude and aptitude Passionate Organised Respectful Committed Team fit Different people with different traits ‘Different people with different traits; Dreamers, implementers, drivers, leaders and strategists.’ [56+ years]
  15. 15. 12 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Strengths of workplace Following on were discussions regarding the strengths of their workplaces. Most employees and employers said their teams were sociable, supportive, and worked well together. Other strengths are listed below. Under 40 yrs: Communicate across all levels Have individual goals Work as a team Sociable amongst each other Respond well to crisis 40-55 yrs: Communicate well Care about their work Focused Problem solving skills Sense of team 56+ yrs: Attitude Challenging Reward effort and achievement Leadership skills Moral values ‘We communicate well, Every day there is corridor chit chat and laughing.’ [40-55yrs]
  16. 16. 13 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Weaknesses of workplace Although all three groups listed communication as a strength, all groups unanimously decided that communication was the main weakness of their workplace; some said the increased use of emails and lack of verbal contact added to this problem. Furthermore, communication between layers of management is a problem. Other weaknesses are listed below. Under 40s: Do not realise people’s skills Individuals do too much Lack of team work Independent problem solving Don’t act like a team 40-55 yrs: Don’t explain expectations Projects not coordinated well Lack of confidence Lack of support Wide gap of experience 56+ yrs: Too autocratic Fear of making mistakes Lack of opportunities Lack of responsibility Promptness of dealing with issues ‘The lack of communication. No one talks, they send emails.’ [40-55yrs]
  17. 17. 14 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Workplace challenges Overall, most agreed that psychographics such as one’s life stage had a stronger influence than age in determining workplace relations. For example, many said that having a child was a unifying factor amongst workers. This was regardless of age, as parents varied widely in age. Each focus group agreed that there were difficulties associated with each age group, broadly speaking. Some believed that younger employees are more adaptable than older ones; whilst older employees are less transient and more loyal than younger ones. The perceived difficulties of each age are listed below. 20-29 yrs: Retention High expectations Attitude – They want it all now Timeliness Impatient Unprepared More vocal about their needs Given too many opportunities Haven’t seen a recession 30-39 yrs: Starting a family-maternity leave Trying to gain work-life balance More inclined to vocalise Considering changing career paths 40-49yrs: Threatened by 30 year olds Autocratic style Considering changing career paths 50-59 yrs: Fearful of change/settled Considering their unfulfilled dreams Mid-life crisis stage Not good at asking for help More inclined to take risks 60+: Inability to use new technologies Seat warmers Waiting for retirement Physically limited
  18. 18. 15 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Working together Employees and employers were asked whether they believe people of all ages can work together and whether they can manage each other. The overriding message that came through was that maturity, skills and one’s life stage were better determining factors than age in regards to whether this can be achieved. However, going by age, the younger focus group [under 40yrs] believed some teams would struggle to work together when there is an age gap exceeding 20 years. Similarly, a 20 year old would struggle to manage someone in their 50s or 60s. The middle aged focus group [40-55 yrs] believed that people across all ages can work together. Their only hesitation was 20 year olds working with 60 years old. Furthermore, they believed that people across all age groups can manage each other. The third focus group [56yr +] agreed with previous groups that people of all ages can work together, manage and be managed by others. However, they also agreed with the younger focus group [under 40yrs], that a 20 year old would struggle to manage someone in their 50s or 60s, and vice versa.
  19. 19. 16 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Survey Findings
  20. 20. 17 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Workplace Segmentations Overview Within workplaces, different segments of employees exist. From this research, we have identified four main segments. The subsequent pages will further define these segments by the top 5 issues that are of extreme importance to them. It is important to note that trust, respect and communication are paramount to all segments. These aspects tie all segments together. The squares below illustrate the size of each segment. DYNAMO [18%] GIMME [21%] MADE IT [40%] PLODDERS [21%]
  21. 21. 18 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Segment 1: Dynamos [18%] The ‘Dynamo’ segment comprises the happiest, most loyal and most secure employees. They are typically females, under 40 years old, who want success in their careers and work well with management. In addition, this segment are the least likely to have worked outside South Australia. The ‘Dynamo’ segment finds the following issues of extreme importance: 1. Trustworthy management 2. Respectful management 3. Trust and respect in their abilities 4. Strong communication skills 5. Forward thinking and innovative management Demographics Under 40 65% 40-59 35% 60+ 0% Male 44% Female 56%
  22. 22. 19 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Segment 2: Gimmes [21%] The ‘Gimme’ segment typically comprise of employees who want to be provided with all the perks, such as expense accounts and car allowances. Yet, they are the least loyal and are least likely to work well with direct management. The majority of the ‘Gimme’ segment comprise of male employees, under 40 years old, working in middle management roles. The ‘Gimme’ segment finds the following issues of extreme importance: 1. Trust and respect in their abilities 2. Trustworthy management 3. Career development opportunities 4. Education and training 5. Places its employees needs as essential to business success Demographics Under 40 65% 40-59 34% 60+ 1% Male 67% Female 33%
  23. 23. 20 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Segment 3: Plodders [21%] The ‘Plodder’ segment typically comprise of male employees, over the age of 40. They generally have families and work in first or middle management roles. Importantly, they have been employed for as long as ‘made it’ employees but have not achieved the same successes. The ‘Plodders’ segment finds the following issues of extreme importance: 1. Trust and respect in abilities 2. Trustworthy management 3. Respectful management 4. Management style that employees respect 5. A well respected and intelligent management Demographics Under 40 37% 40-59 55% 60+ 8% Male 73% Female 27%
  24. 24. 21 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Segment 4: Made its [40%] The ‘Made it’ segment typically comprise of employees who have found success and contentment in their careers. They are less superficial and are less likely to want company perks or require their employer to have a strong employer image. They work well with their team, yet feel less confident about finding another similar or suitable job. The majority of ‘Made it’ employees are males in senior management roles. The ‘Made it’ segment finds the following issues of extreme importance: 1. Trust and respect in abilities 2. Trustworthy management 3. Respectful management 4. Management with strong communication skills 5. Career development opportunities Demographics Under 40 44% 40-59 54% 60+ 3% Male 72% Female 28%
  25. 25. 22 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Job Satisfaction Overall Job Satisfaction With all aspects considered, the majority of employees [87%] are happy in their current job; this includes 17% who are extremely happy. Key Patterns: Those aged 60+ are slightly happier with their current job [96%] than those aged under 40 [86%] Those in the ‘Dynamo’ segment are slightly happier [92%] than those in the ‘Gimme’ segment [83%] How satisfied are you in your current job? Extremely happy Quite happy Quite unhappy Extremely unhappy Total 17% 70% 11% 2% Age groups Under 40 17% 69% 12% 2% 40-59 20% 68% 10% 2% 60+ 20% 76% 0% 4% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 18% 74% 7% 1% ‘Gimme’ 13% 70% 16% 2% ‘Plodders’ 17% 70% 10% 3% ‘Made it’ 20% 68% 11% 2% Extremely happy employees...
  26. 26. 23 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Likelihood of working for same employer The majority of employees [84%] are extremely [46%] or quite likely [39%] to be working for the same employer next year. Three quarters of all employees [74%] are extremely [29%] or quite likely [45%] to be working for the same employer in two years time. Two thirds of all employees [64%] are extremely [21%] or quite likely [43%] to be working for the same employer in three years time. Key Patterns: Nine in ten employees aged 40 to 59 [89%] are likely to be working for the same employer next year Almost half of ‘Gimme’ employees [44%] are unlikely to be working for the same employer in three years time Almost half of employees aged 60+ [48%] are unlikely to be working for the same employer in three years time, this may be attributable to nearing the age of retirement Likely to be working for the same employer in...* One year Two years Three years Total likelihood [ext. likely] 84% [46%] 74% [29%] 64% [21%] Age groups: Under 40 83% [43%] 70% [24%] 57% [15%] 40-59 89% [51%] 78% [36%] 69% [26%] 60+ 72% [40%] 68% [20%] 52% [12%] Segments: ‘Dynamo’ 84% [53%] 80% [33%] 66% [25%] ‘Gimme’ 77% [37%] 66% [25%] 56% [19%] ‘Plodders’ 84% [50%] 72% [34%] 67% [18%] ‘Made it’ 86% [44%] 76% [27%] 66% [21%] *These figures were calculated from the total sample Extremely loyal employees...
  27. 27. 24 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Job security The majority of employees [89%] are feeling extremely [25%] or quite secure [64%] in their current job. Key Patterns: Three in ten employees in the ‘Dynamo’ segment [29%] feel extremely secure in their current job More than one quarter of those aged under 40 [28%] feel likewise One fifth of those 60+ [20%] feel insecure in their current job Those who are feeling insecure in their current job [11%] were asked their reasons. More than half of those who are feeling insecure [57%] said it was due to the current economic downturn. Others said it was due to their lack of skills [33%] and/or an unstable employer [27%]. Few [5%] said it was due to their age. Extremely secure employees... How secure do you feel in your current job? Extremely secure Quite secure Quite insecure Extremely insecure Total 25% 64% 9% 2% Age groups Under 40 28% 64% 7% 2% 40-59 23% 67% 10% 1% 60+ 20% 60% 12% 8% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 29% 62% 8% 1% ‘Gimme’ 24% 64% 8% 4% ‘Plodders’ 22% 65% 10% 3% ‘Made it’ 25% 65% 9% 1%
  28. 28. 25 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Likelihood of finding another similar job The majority of employees are confident that if they were to lose their current job they would find another similar or suitable job. A total of 80% said it would be extremely [16%] or quite likely [64%] that they would find another similar job. Key Patterns: A majority of those aged under 40 [85%] said they are likely to find another similar job More than one third of those aged 60+ [36%] said they are unlikely to find another similar job One quarter of ‘Made it’ employees [23%] said they are unlikely to find another similar job Those who said they are unlikely to find another similar job were asked to provide their reasons. The economic downturn was the most common reason [44%] amongst all concerned. This was followed by age [43%], which was main reason amongst 95% of those over the age of 40, including 64% of those over the age of 50. Lack of skills [14%] was another reason; this was the reason provided by 57% of those over the age of 40. Likelihood of finding another similar job Extremely likely Quite likely Quite unlikely Extremely unlikely Total 16% 64% 18% 3% Age groups Under 40 18% 67% 14% 1% 40-59 13% 62% 21% 4% 60+ 12% 52% 28% 8% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 15% 68% 16% 1% ‘Gimme’ 16% 62% 19% 3% ‘Plodders’ 18% 64% 14% 4% ‘Made it’ 14% 63% 20% 3%
  29. 29. 26 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Immediate Team Profile of direct manager Respondents were asked the approximate age and gender of their direct managers. The majority of direct managers [72%] are aged 40 to 59. One quarter [23%] are aged under 40 years old. The majority of direct managers [71%] are male. Demographic of direct manager Total Under 40 23% 40-59 72% 60+ 6% Female 29% Male 71%
  30. 30. 27 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work well with direct manager The vast majority of employees [91%] said they work extremely [42%] or quite well [49%] with their direct manager/supervisor. Key Pattern: A slightly higher percentage of ‘Dynamo’ employees [93%] than ‘Gimme’ employees [87%] work well with their direct managers How well do you work with your direct manager? Extremely well Quite well Not very well Not at all well Total 42% 49% 7% 2% Age groups Under 40 43% 48% 7% 2% 40-59 44% 48% 7% 1% 60+ 44% 48% 8% 0% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 44% 49% 6% 1% ‘Gimme’ 39% 48% 11% 3% ‘Plodders’ 44% 47% 7% 3% ‘Made it’ 42% 52% 6% 1%
  31. 31. 28 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Profile of team Employees were asked the age and gender of their team. There is an average of 10 people in a work team, with an average of 6 males and 5 females. The majority of the team [93%] are under the age of 60; including 46% aged 40 to 59, and 47% under 40 years old. Fewer team members [6%] are over 60 years old. Demographic of team Total Under 40 47% 40-59 46% 60+ 6% Female 49% Male 51%
  32. 32. 29 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work well with team The vast majority of employees [98%] said they work extremely [48%] or quite well [50%] with their team. Key Patterns: Three fifths of those aged 60+ [60%] work extremely well with their team Similarly 53% of ‘Made it’ employees work extremely well with their team How well do you work with your immediate team? Extremely well Quite well Not very well Not at all well Total 48% 50% 2% 0% Age groups Under 40 46% 52% 2% 0% 40-59 50% 49% 1% 0% 60+ 60% 40% 0% 0% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 50% 47% 2% 1% ‘Gimme’ 45% 53% 2% 0% ‘Plodders’ 40% 58% 1% 0% ‘Made it’ 53% 45% 1% 0%
  33. 33. 30 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Person you work ‘best with’ Employees were asked to think of one person in their team that they work best with. Following this, they were asked why they work well with this person. The vast majority [97%] were able to do so. One in four of those [25%] said they work well with this person because they share a similar work ethic/approach to their work. These reasons are illustrated below. 25% 19% 14% 11% Similar work ethic Similar age 6% Mutual respect Similar interests/personality Communication skills
  34. 34. 31 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Profile of person you work ‘best with’ Subsequently, employees were asked to describe this person in their team that they work well with. This person was typically under 40 years old [51%], and first level/middle management [58%]. Key Pattern: Those under 40 are likely to work best with a female [55%] Demographic of person you work ‘best with’ Total Under 40 40-59 60+ Under 40 51% 62% 36% 40% 40-59 47% 37% 61% 56% 60+ 2% 2% 4% 4% Female 48% 55% 54% 52% Male 52% 39% 44% 48%
  35. 35. 32 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Person you do not work so well with Employees were asked to think of one person in their team that they do not work so well with. Following this, they were then asked why they do not work well with this person. The majority [92%] were able to do so. These reasons are illustrated below. 16% 12% 12% 10% Conflicting work ethic Age 3% Different personalities Poor communicator Moody / argumentative 8% 7% Not a team player Rude / arrogant
  36. 36. 33 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Profile of person you do not work so well with Subsequently, employees were asked to describe this person in their team that they do not work so well with. This person was typically over the age of 40 [58%], male [60%] and first level/middle management [45%]. Demographic of person you do not work well with Total Under 40 40-59 60+ Under 40 42% 46% 39% 29% 40-59 53% 50% 55% 72% 60+ 5% 4% 6% 0% Female 40% 41% 41% 52% Male 60% 42% 41% 32%
  37. 37. 34 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Age of team Employees were asked the approximate age of the youngest and oldest people in their team. On average, the youngest person is 27 years old, whilst the oldest person is 53 years old. Key Patterns: The largest age gap was amongst employees over 60; their teams have an average of 32 years difference There was consistency amongst the ideal age of employees amongst all segments Older employees have older ideal ages for team members and managers Subsequently, employees were asked if someone new joins their team, what would be their ideal minimum and maximum age to best fit in with the current team. On average, the ideal youngest age of a new team member would be 25 years old; whilst the ideal maximum age would be 48 years old. On average, the ideal youngest age of a new manager would be 34 years old; whilst the ideal maximum age would be 51 years old. Current and ideal average age of team Current team: Total Under 40 40-59 60+ Youngest person 27 26 29 31 Oldest person 53 51 55 63 New team member: Ideal minimum age 25 24 27 30 Ideal maximum age 48 46 50 57 New manager: Ideal minimum age 34 32 36 38 Ideal maximum age 51 50 53 60
  38. 38. 35 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important Workplace Aspects The following tables* illustrate the importance of aspects relating to: *It is important to note that the following tables only show key aspects, please refer to Appendices for full tables Work environment Work-life balance Management Salary package Employer image Responsibility and challenge Training and development
  39. 39. 36 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Employer offerings Important aspects of salary package amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to salary package. The most important aspects amongst employees include: 1. Education and training [97%] 2. Career development opportunities [97%] 3. Flexibility in hours worked [97%] Key Pattern: Payment for overtime and additional hours worked is less important [32% importance] amongst those over the age of 60 Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables Importance of salary package [extremely + quite important] [Extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Education and training 97% 98% 96% 92% Career development opportunity 97% 98% 96% 88% Flexibility in hours worked 97% 97% 96% 92% Salary above average 87% 88% 86% 72% Time in lieu 85% 89% 82% 72% Bonus based on individual performance 78% 81% 74% 68% Reimbursement expense account 66% 66% 65% 80% Payment for overtime and additional hours worked 62% 71% 53% 32% Car allowance 47% 47% 46% 60% Very important Less important
  40. 40. 37 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of salary package amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to salary package amongst each segment group. Key Patterns: Payment for overtime and additional hours worked is less important [44% importance] amongst the ‘Made it’ group. A car allowance is more important amongst ‘Gimme’ [85% importance] than ‘Dynamo’ [27%] or ‘Made it’ [33%] segment groups. Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of salary package [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Career development opportunity 99% 99% 98% 95% Education and training 98% 100% 99% 95% Flexibility in hours worked 98% 100% 96% 94% Time in lieu 89% 96% 85% 77% Pay / salary is above average compared with other employers 88% 99% 89% 78% Salary sacrifice options 81% 95% 82% 67% Bonus based on individual performance 77% 94% 86% 65% Payment for overtime and additional hours worked 75% 83% 57% 44% Bonus based on company performance 59% 87% 77% 50% Reimbursement expense account 57% 91% 79% 51% Car allowance 27% 85% 56% 33% Very important Less important
  41. 41. 38 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Training and Development Important aspects of training and development amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to training and development. The most important aspects include: 1. Close development relationship with manager/s [98%] 2. Regular ‘constructive’ performance reviews [94%] 3. Ability to attend 1-3 day external courses [93%] Key Pattern: Paid time off to undertake tertiary studies is less important [44% importance] amongst those over the age of 60 Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of training and development [Ext+ quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Close development relationship with manager 98% 98% 97% 96% Regular 'constructive' performance reviews 94% 95% 92% 88% Ability to attend 1-3 day external courses 93% 93% 93% 84% Paid to attend conferences 90% 90% 90% 80% Formalized internal education programs 88% 90% 86% 84% Paid to attend industry and business networking events 86% 86% 86% 84% Mentoring program 83% 85% 81% 88% Tertiary studies paid for by employer 78% 80% 76% 64% Paid time off to undertake tertiary studies 76% 79% 73% 44% Very important Less important
  42. 42. 39 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of training and development amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to training and development amongst each segment group. Key Patterns: The ability to attend 1-3 day courses is more important amongst ‘Gimme’ segment group than other groups Similarly, mentoring programs are more important amongst ‘Gimme’ segment group than other groups Tertiary studies are less important amongst ‘Made it’ segment group   Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of training and development [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Close development relationship with manager 99% 100% 98% 95% Regular 'constructive' performance reviews 96% 97% 95% 90% Ability to attend 1-3 day external courses 95% 99% 94% 87% Formalized internal education programs 94% 95% 94% 77% Paid to attend conferences 92% 96% 89% 85% Mentoring program 90% 95% 85% 71% Paid to attend industry and business networking events 89% 93% 90% 78% Paid time off to undertake tertiary studies 85% 89% 73% 63% Tertiary studies paid for by employer 83% 91% 75% 68% Very important Less important
  43. 43. 40 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Responsibility and Challenge Important aspects of responsibility and challenge amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to responsibility and challenge. The most important aspects include: 1. Trust and respect in your abilities [100%] 2. Diversity of responsibilities [99%] Key Pattern: Many aspects relating to responsibility and challenge are important to employees across all age groups Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of responsibility and challenge [Ext. + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Trust and respect in your abilities 100% 100% 100% 100% Diversity of responsibilities 98% 98% 98% 100% Encourages you to work as a team 97% 97% 97% 100% Taking on higher level complex tasks 97% 97% 98% 100% Future opportunity for advancement etc 97% 99% 95% 88% Allows you to be creative 97% 97% 97% 100% Ability to have strategic input into business 94% 93% 95% 100% Opportunity to work with senior management 94% 93% 94% 96% Reward for successfully completing complex tasks 93% 95% 90% 84% Very important Less important
  44. 44. 41 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of responsibility and challenge amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to responsibility and challenge amongst each segment group. Key Pattern: A reward for successfully completing complex tasks is slightly less important amongst the ‘Made it’ segment group Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of responsibility and challenge [Ext + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Trust and respect in your abilities 100% 100% 100% 99% Future opportunity for advancement etc 98% 100% 95% 95% Diversity of responsibilities 98% 100% 100% 97% Allows you to be creative 98% 100% 97% 94% Encourages you to work as a team 98% 100% 98% 95% Taking on higher level complex tasks 98% 99% 98% 96% Ability to have strategic input into business 95% 96% 96% 91% Reward for successfully completing complex tasks 95% 97% 97% 86% Opportunity to work with senior management 95% 98% 96% 89% Very important Less important
  45. 45. 42 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Employer Image Important aspects of employer image Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to employer image. The most important aspects include: 1. Employer that places its employees needs as essential to business success [99%] 2. Strong business performance [95%] 3. A vision/mission you believe in and support [95%] Key Pattern: An employer with marketing and advertising that appeals to them is slightly more important amongst those over the age of 60 [76%] than those 40-59 years old [58%] or younger [59%] Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of employer image [Ext. + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Places its employees needs as essential to business success 99% 99% 98% 96% Strong business performance 95% 95% 95% 96% A vision / mission you believe in and support 95% 93% 96% 92% Contributes to the community 89% 86% 93% 88% A reputation as an employer of choice 87% 85% 88% 92% Visible and well known employer within your industry 84% 85% 83% 84% Visible and well known employer amongst most Australians 65% 66% 64% 64% Marketing and advertising that appeals to you 59% 59% 58% 76% Very important Less important
  46. 46. 43 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of employer image amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to employer image amongst each segment group. Key Patterns: The ‘Gimme’ segment find most of the aspects relating to employer image more important than other segments A visible and well know employer amongst most Australians is less important amongst the ‘Made it’ segment [37%] Similarly, an employer with marketing and advertising that appeal to them is less important amongst the ‘Made it’ segment [36%]   Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of employer image [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Places its employees needs as essential to business success 99% 100% 99% 97% A vision / mission you believe in and support 96% 97% 98% 90% Strong business performance 96% 99% 98% 91% Contributes to the community 95% 94% 95% 79% A reputation as an employer of choice 93% 96% 93% 74% Visible and well known employer within your industry 88% 95% 92% 72% Visible and well known employer amongst most Australians 73% 85% 86% 37% Marketing and advertising that appeals to you 62% 79% 79% 36% Very important Less important
  47. 47. 44 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work-Life Balance Important aspects of work-life balance amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to work-life balance The most important aspects include: 1. Has a reasonable view of hours worked per week [97%] 2. Has a family friendly policy [87%] 3. Allows working from home [83%] Key Patterns: Paid paternity leave is less important amongst those over the age of 60 years old [24%] than those under 40 [69%] Similarly workplaces with child care centres are less important amongst those over the age of 60 years old [20%] than those under 40 [42%] Importance of work-life balance [Ext. + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Has a reasonable view of hours worked/week 97% 97% 97% 88% Has a family friendly policy 87% 85% 88% 84% Allows working from home 83% 85% 81% 72% A supportive policy for time off for sick children 79% 81% 78% 52% Staff and management informal lunches 75% 80% 68% 68% Flexibility in hours to fit with picking-up children 74% 79% 69% 56% Paid maternity leave 61% 76% 43% 36% Events for staff and families 57% 62% 51% 60% Paid paternity leave 55% 69% 40% 24% Workplace has a child care centre 34% 42% 25% 20% Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Very important Less important
  48. 48. 45 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of work-life balance amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to work- life balance amongst each segment group. Key Patterns: Workplaces with a reasonable view of hours worked per week are important amongst all segments. Paid maternity leave is more important amongst the ‘Dynamo’ segment group [96%] than the ‘Plodders’ segment [15%] The ‘Gimme’ segment also believe a family friendly policy [98%] and a supportive policy for time off for sick children [97%] are important Paid paternity leave is less important amongst the ‘Plodders’ segment [10%]; similarly workplace childcare centres are less important amongst this group [9%] An active social club is less important amongst ‘Made it’ segment [18%] than ‘Gimme’ segment [70%]   Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of work-life balance [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Has a reasonable view of hours worked/week 99% 100% 96% 94% Paid maternity leave 96% 95% 15% 41% Has a family friendly policy 95% 98% 85% 75% A supportive policy for time off for sick children 94% 97% 63% 67% Paid paternity leave 92% 94% 10% 32% Allows working from home 88% 97% 81% 72% Staff and management informal lunches 88% 88% 77% 57% Offers break-away or creative areas for staff 87% 88% 80% 38% Events for staff and families 76% 83% 63% 28% An active social club 61% 70% 51% 18% Workplace has a child care centre 48% 75% 9% 14% Very important Less important
  49. 49. 46 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Management Important aspects of management amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to management. Key Pattern: All aspects relating to management are important amongst employees of all ages, especially respectful and trustworthy management Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of management [Ext. + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Respectful management 100% 100% 100% 100% Trustworthy management 100% 100% 100% 100% Strong communications skills 99% 100% 99% 100% Has reasonable standards for output and workload 99% 99% 100% 100% Treats you as an individual 99% 99% 99% 100% Well respected and intelligent 99% 99% 99% 100% Management structure allows input from staff 99% 99% 99% 100% Management willing to delegate responsibilities 99% 99% 99% 100% Forward thinking and innovative management 99% 98% 99% 100% A style that you respect 99% 99% 98% 100% Very important Less important
  50. 50. 47 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of management amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to management amongst each segment group. Key Pattern: All aspects relating to management are important amongst all segments Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of management [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Trustworthy management 100% 100% 100% 100% Treats you as an individual 100% 100% 100% 98% Encourages staff to feel happy 100% 99% 99% 96% Management structure that allows input from all staff 100% 100% 99% 97% Respectful management 100% 100% 100% 99% Strong communications skills 100% 100% 100% 99% Well respected and intelligent 99% 100% 99% 98% Forward thinking and innovative management 99% 100% 100% 97% Good team coordinator 99% 100% 98% 97% Has reasonable standards for output and workload 99% 100% 100% 99% Very important Less important
  51. 51. 48 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work Environment Important aspects of work environment amongst age groups Employees were asked to rate the level of importance of various aspects relating to work environment. Most important aspects include: 1. An environment that encourages staff to be productive [98%] 2. Comfortable [97%] 3. Safe [97%] Key Patterns: All employees aged 40-59 [99%] believe it is important that their work environment encourages staff to be productive Quiet areas are slightly less important amongst those over the age of 60 [64%] Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of work environment [Ext. + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ An environment that encourages staff to be productive 98% 97% 99% 96% Comfortable 97% 97% 97% 96% Safe 97% 97% 96% 88% A casual and friendly work environment 96% 96% 95% 88% An environment that encourages staff to be creative 90% 89% 91% 92% Car parking available for staff 77% 78% 77% 72% Quiet areas 76% 76% 76% 64% Very important Less important
  52. 52. 49 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects of work environment amongst segments The following table illustrates the importance of issues relating to work environment amongst each segment. Key Patterns: All of those in the ‘Dynamo’ segment [100%] believe a comfortable workplace is important Relaxation areas are less important [29%] amongst those in the ‘Made it’ segment   Please refer to Appendices for full, unedited tables. Importance of work environment [Ext. + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Comfortable 100% 99% 99% 94% An environment that encourages staff to be productive 99% 99% 98% 95% Safe 99% 98% 96% 94% A casual and friendly work environment 98% 99% 98% 91% An environment that encourages staff to be creative 92% 96% 92% 84% Quiet areas 89% 90% 79% 57% Relaxation areas 81% 79% 78% 29% Modern office design 79% 82% 75% 53% Car parking available for staff [or paid by employer] 75% 91% 85% 67% Very important Less important
  53. 53. 50 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Uniqueness Uniqueness of your workplace The vast majority [93%] were able to describe a unique feature of their workplace. One in five of those [18%] said their workplace was unique due to the age/life stage of employees. Other unique features are illustrated below. 6% 18% 17% 11% 7% 6% Age / Life Stage Gender/ Female Knowledgeable Experience Ability / Skills Communication
  54. 54. 51 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Working in South Australia The vast majority of respondents [99%] currently work in South Australia. Furthermore, 95% were able to describe why they work in South Australia rather than interstate or overseas. Reasons: Family/friends [42%] ‘Good place to raise a family’ Grew up here [14%] ‘Always lived in SA, don’t want to move’ Enjoy living/working here [14%] ‘I enjoy living in South Australia’ Lifestyle [13%] ‘Lifestyle and relaxed approach’ Affordable [3%] ‘Cost of living’ ‘South Australia is the greatest place in the world to live and work.’
  55. 55. 52 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Working outside South Australia Despite this, half [53%] have worked outside of South Australia in the past. This is more significant amongst those in the ‘Gimme’ [58%], ‘Plodders’ [55%] and ‘Made it’ segments [55%] than those in ‘Dynamo’ segment [42%] Of those who have worked outside of South Australia, 78% worked interstate and 50% worked overseas. On average, those who have worked outside of South Australia did so for an average of 8 years. Those over 60 were more likely to have worked outside South Australia. WORKED OUTSIDE OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA Worked outside SA Worked interstate* Worked overseas* Total 53% 78% 50% Age groups Under 40 43% 69% 56% 40-59 54% 79% 48% 60+ 84% 86% 38% Segments ‘Dynamo’ 42% 71% 59% ‘Gimme’ 58% 77% 49% ‘Plodders’ 55% 78% 46% ‘Made it’ 55% 81% 50% *Those who have worked outside South Australia in the past Worked outside of South Australia in the past....
  56. 56. Employee Profile
  57. 57. 54 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA The following charts provide a detailed illustration of the employee and segment profile for this Generation Gap study. There was a fairly even distribution of age groups amongst employee respondents; with an equal number of employees under the age of 40 [50%] and over the age of 40 [50%]. Following this, respondents were asked how old they felt. Interestingly, the majority [77%] feel under the age of 40 years. This is mainly attributable to their health/fitness [48%] and having children [21%]. Similarly, there is a fairly even distribution of household compositions, young families [27%] to mature couples/singles [20%]. There was a skew in gender; with two thirds male [66%] and one third female respondents [34%]. Employees surveyed have been working for an average of 20 years and in this time have had an average of 5 jobs. The majority of employees [69%] earn over $60,000; this includes two fifths [41%] who earn $60,001 to $80,000. The majority of employees are employed in a management position [77%] including 22% in senior management/CEO positions. The employees are HR consultants [7%], administrative assistants [4%] and accountants [3%]. More than half of employees [56%] hold a bachelors degree or higher. High school is the highest level of education amongst one fifth of employees [22%].
  58. 58. 55 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA 28% 25% 11% 12% 18% 36% 41% 26% 32% 33% 22% 20% 34% 31% 28% 13% 14% 21% 23% 19% 8% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total AGE [n=1053] 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 44% 67% 73% 72% 66% 56% 33% 27% 28% 34% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total GENDER Male Female 8% 9% 14% 6% 7% 9% 20% 18% 12% 15% 16% 30% 29% 29% 27% 28% 29% 33% 46% 48% 41% 5% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME [n=1053] Up to $40,000 $40,001 to $50,000 $50,001 to $60,000 $60,001 to $80,000 More than $80,000 Refuse to say 14% 14% 10% 11% 12% 26% 26% 9% 14% 18% 26% 30% 25% 27% 27% 12% 12% 14% 17% 14% 6% 6% 15% 10% 9% 15% 12% 27% 22% 20% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION Young single/s Young couple Young family Middle family Mature family Mature couple/single
  59. 59. 56 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA 21% 24% 27% 20% 22% 6% 15% 19% 13% 20% 17% 42% 38% 39% 43% 41% 17% 15% 15% 14% 15% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total LEVEL OF EDUCATION High school Apprentice VET qualification Bachelor degree Masters or higher Refused/Don't know 6% 5% 10% 15% 19% 23% 18% 33% 33% 41% 35% 36% 20% 25% 17% 18% 20% 18% 21% 13% 13% 16% 17% 5% 4% 7% 8% Dynamo Gimme Plodders Made it Total MANAGEMENT ROLE CEO/MD Senior management Functional management First level management Office administration/Junior Refused/Don't know
  60. 60. Business Profile
  61. 61. 58 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA The following charts provide a detailed illustration of the business profile for this survey. A wide range of industries were included in this survey; such as government administration [15%], finance and insurance [12%] and manufacturing [10%]. Two thirds [67%] of businesses employ more than 100 full time staff. This is followed by businesses which employ 51 to 100 [13%], 11 to 50 [12%] and 6 to 10 full time staff [5%]. 6% 5% 6% 4% 5% 7% 6% 6% 5% 7% 8% 3% 6% 6% 5% 7% 6% 13% 9% 11% 9% 10% 11% 10% 12% 11% 13% 11% 12% 25% 13% 8% 14% 15% Determined Give me Disillusioned Made it Total INDUSTRY Education Construction Electricity, Gas and Water Supply Health and community Services Manufacturing Finance and Insurance Government Administration 6% 7% 5% 5% 12% 9% 13% 13% 12% 9% 11% 13% 16% 13% 70% 68% 68% 65% 67% Determined Give me Disillusioned Made it Total NUMBER OF FULL TIME STAFF Less than 5 6 to 10 11 to 50 51 to 100 More than 100
  62. 62. Appendices
  63. 63. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Employer offerings Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Education and training 97% 98% 96% 92% Career development opportunity 97% 98% 96% 88% Flexibility in hours worked 97% 97% 96% 92% Salary above average compared with other employers 87% 88% 86% 72% Time in lieu 85% 89% 82% 72% Salary sacrifice options 79% 75% 84% 84% Bonus based on individual performance 78% 81% 74% 68% Professional memberships paid 66% 71% 61% 72% Reimbursement expense account 66% 66% 65% 80% Bonus based on company performance 65% 67% 63% 68% Payment for overtime and additional hours worked 62% 71% 53% 32% Relocation allowance 54% 54% 56% 36% Car allowance 47% 47% 46% 60% Job share 40% 43% 37% 32% Medical insurance paid 40% 36% 44% 44% Vehicle lease paid by employer 40% 36% 44% 32% Discount programs 36% 39% 32% 24% Company paid credit card 36% 35% 36% 48% Ability to purchase equity of shares in the business in the future 32% 34% 30% 24% School fee subsidy 31% 35% 28% 12% Equity or shares in the business now 29% 30% 29% 24% Gym membership 27% 31% 23% 8% Gift vouchers 25% 26% 24% 16%
  64. 64. 61 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Career development opportunity 99% 99% 98% 95% Education and training 98% 100% 99% 95% Flexibility in hours worked 98% 100% 96% 94% Time in lieu 89% 96% 85% 77% Pay / salary is above average compared with other employers 88% 99% 89% 78% Salary sacrifice options 81% 95% 82% 67% Bonus based on individual performance 77% 94% 86% 65% Payment for overtime and additional hours worked 75% 83% 57% 44% Professional memberships paid 66% 87% 72% 51% Bonus based on company performance 59% 87% 77% 50% Reimbursement expense account 57% 91% 79% 51% Job share 56% 58% 36% 22% Relocation allowance 54% 80% 57% 38% Discount programs 34% 62% 49% 15% School fee subsidy 30% 55% 27% 21% Car allowance 27% 85% 56% 33% Gym membership 24% 48% 30% 14% Gift vouchers 24% 47% 29% 11% Medical insurance paid 23% 72% 56% 23% Equity or shares in the business now 19% 57% 38% 15% Vehicle lease paid by employer 18% 70% 43% 34% Company paid credit card 17% 66% 49% 23% Ability to purchase equity of shares in the business in the future 16% 66% 45% 17%
  65. 65. 62 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Training and Development Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Close development relationship with your manager[s] 98% 98% 97% 96% Regular 'constructive' performance reviews 94% 95% 92% 88% Ability to attend 1-3 day external courses 93% 93% 93% 84% Paid to attend conferences 90% 90% 90% 80% Formalized internal education programs 88% 90% 86% 84% Paid to attend industry and business networking events 86% 86% 86% 84% Mentoring program 83% 85% 81% 88% Tertiary studies paid for by employer 78% 80% 76% 64% Paid time off to undertake tertiary studies 76% 79% 73% 44% Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Close development relationship with your manager[s] 99% 100% 98% 95% Regular 'constructive' performance reviews 96% 97% 95% 90% Ability to attend 1-3 day external courses 95% 99% 94% 87% Formalized internal education programs 94% 95% 94% 77% Paid to attend conferences 92% 96% 89% 85% Mentoring program 90% 95% 85% 71% Paid to attend industry and business networking events 89% 93% 90% 78% Paid time off to undertake tertiary studies 85% 89% 73% 63% Tertiary studies paid for by employer 83% 91% 75% 68%
  66. 66. 63 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Responsibility and Challenge Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Trust and respect in your abilities 100% 100% 100% 100% Diversity of responsibilities 98% 98% 98% 100% Encourages you to work as a team 97% 97% 97% 100% Taking on higher level complex tasks 97% 97% 98% 100% Future opportunity for advancement and more responsibility 97% 99% 95% 88% Allows you to be creative 97% 97% 97% 100% Ability to have strategic input into business 94% 93% 95% 100% Opportunity to work with senior management 94% 93% 94% 96% Reward you for successfully completing complex tasks 93% 95% 90% 84% Opportunity to deal with clients 85% 83% 87% 100% Opportunity to deal with major clients independently 81% 80% 83% 96% Managing other staff 79% 80% 77% 76% Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Trust and respect in your abilities 100% 100% 100% 99% Future opportunity for advancement and more responsibility 98% 100% 95% 95% Diversity of responsibilities 98% 100% 100% 97% Allows you to be creative 98% 100% 97% 94% Encourages you to work as a team 98% 100% 98% 95% Taking on higher level complex tasks 98% 99% 98% 96% Ability to have strategic input into business 95% 96% 96% 91% Reward you for successfully completing complex tasks 95% 97% 97% 86% Opportunity to work with senior management 95% 98% 96% 89% Opportunity to deal with clients 87% 92% 90% 77% Opportunity to deal with major clients independently 83% 92% 82% 73% Managing other staff 81% 92% 78% 70%
  67. 67. 64 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Employer Image Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Places its employees needs as essential to business success 99% 99% 98% 96% Strong business performance 95% 95% 95% 96% A vision / mission you believe in and support 95% 93% 96% 92% Contributes to the community 89% 86% 93% 88% Cares for the environment 89% 87% 92% 88% A reputation as an employer of choice 87% 85% 88% 92% Visible and well known employer within your industry 84% 85% 83% 84% Visible and well known employer amongst most South Australians 72% 72% 72% 80% Visible and well known employer amongst most Australians 65% 66% 64% 64% Marketing and advertising that appeals to you 59% 59% 58% 76% Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Places its employees needs as essential to business success 99% 100% 99% 97% A vision / mission you believe in and support 96% 97% 98% 90% Strong business performance 96% 99% 98% 91% Contributes to the community 95% 94% 95% 79% A reputation as an employer of choice 93% 96% 93% 74% Cares for the environment 92% 95% 94% 81% Visible and well known employer within your industry 88% 95% 92% 72% Visible and well known employer amongst most South Australians 77% 87% 88% 52% Visible and well known employer amongst most Australians 73% 85% 86% 37% Marketing and advertising that appeals to you 62% 79% 79% 36%
  68. 68. 65 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work-Life Balance Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Has a reasonable view of hours worked in an average week 97% 97% 97% 88% Has a family friendly policy 87% 85% 88% 84% Allows working from home 83% 85% 81% 72% A supportive policy for time off for sick children 79% 81% 78% 52% Provides paid time off from time-to-time in addition to annual leave allowances 76% 81% 71% 56% Staff and management regularly meet for informal lunches, drinks etc 75% 80% 68% 68% Flexibility in hours to fit with picking-up and dropping off children 74% 79% 69% 56% Offers break-away or creative areas for staff 68% 70% 67% 56% Paid maternity leave 61% 76% 43% 36% Events for staff and families 57% 62% 51% 60% Paid paternity leave 55% 69% 40% 24% An active social club 46% 51% 40% 40% Workplace has a child care centre or minding service 34% 42% 25% 20%
  69. 69. 66 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Has a reasonable view of hours worked in an average week 99% 100% 96% 94% Paid maternity leave 96% 95% 15% 41% Has a family friendly policy 95% 98% 85% 75% A supportive policy for time off for sick children 94% 97% 63% 67% Flexibility in hours to fit with picking-up and dropping off children 92% 93% 56% 60% Paid paternity leave 92% 94% 10% 32% Allows working from home 88% 97% 81% 72% Staff and management regularly meet for informal lunches 88% 88% 77% 57% Offers break-away or creative areas for staff 87% 88% 80% 38% Provides paid time off from time-to-time in addition to annual leave 84% 94% 75% 62% Events for staff and families 76% 83% 63% 28% An active social club 61% 70% 51% 18% Workplace has a child care centre or minding service 48% 75% 9% 14%
  70. 70. 67 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Management Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ Respectful management 100% 100% 100% 100% Trustworthy management 100% 100% 100% 100% Strong communications skills 99% 100% 99% 100% Has reasonable standards for output and workload 99% 99% 100% 100% Treats you as an individual 99% 99% 99% 100% Well respected and intelligent 99% 99% 99% 100% Management structure that allows input from all staff 99% 99% 99% 100% Management willing to delegate responsibilities 99% 99% 99% 100% Forward thinking and innovative management 99% 98% 99% 100% A style that you respect 99% 99% 98% 100% Good team coordinator 99% 99% 99% 96% Encourages staff to feel happy 98% 98% 98% 92% Management that have staff development as a primary focus 98% 98% 97% 96% Fun and personable management 95% 95% 94% 92%
  71. 71. 68 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Treats you as an individual 100% 100% 100% 98% Encourages staff to feel happy 100% 99% 99% 96% Management structure that allows input from all staff 100% 100% 99% 97% Respectful management 100% 100% 100% 99% Trustworthy management 100% 100% 100% 100% Strong communications skills 100% 100% 100% 99% Well respected and intelligent 99% 100% 99% 98% Forward thinking and innovative management 99% 100% 100% 97% Good team coordinator 99% 100% 98% 97% Has reasonable standards for output and workload 99% 100% 100% 99% Management that have staff development as a primary focus 99% 100% 98% 96% A style that you respect 99% 100% 100% 97% Management willing to delegate responsibilities 98% 100% 100% 98% Fun and personable management 97% 98% 99% 89%
  72. 72. 69 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Work Environment Important aspects [extremely + quite important] Total Under 40 40 - 59 60+ An environment that encourages staff to be productive 98% 97% 99% 96% Comfortable 97% 97% 97% 96% Safe 97% 97% 96% 88% A casual and friendly work environment 96% 96% 95% 88% An environment that encourages staff to be creative 90% 89% 91% 92% Car parking available for staff [or paid by employer] 77% 78% 77% 72% Quiet areas 76% 76% 76% 64% Modern office design 70% 69% 70% 64% Relaxation areas 61% 62% 60% 48% Your own office 57% 53% 63% 56% A partitioned area 53% 52% 55% 40% Open-plan office space 38% 44% 31% 36% Working outside 28% 30% 26% 8% No fixed office / mobile office 22% 23% 20% 16%
  73. 73. 70 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Important aspects [extremely + quite important] ‘Dynamo’ ‘Gimme’ ‘Plodders’ ‘Made it’ Comfortable 100% 99% 99% 94% An environment that encourages staff to be productive 99% 99% 98% 95% Safe 99% 98% 96% 94% A casual and friendly work environment 98% 99% 98% 91% An environment that encourages staff to be creative 92% 96% 92% 84% Quiet areas 89% 90% 79% 57% Relaxation areas 81% 79% 78% 29% Modern office design 79% 82% 75% 53% Car parking available for staff [or paid by employer] 75% 91% 85% 67% A partitioned area 60% 76% 62% 29% Open-plan office space 52% 53% 46% 16% Your own office 48% 77% 67% 47% Working outside 28% 51% 28% 14% No fixed office / mobile office 23% 36% 24% 11%
  74. 74. 71 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Methodology A total of 1053 online surveys were completed by employees. The online questionnaire was formulated and launched from the Square Holes facility on Regent Street North in Adelaide in March 2009. The approach was identical to that of the SA Great, AIM ‘retention study’ in 2007, which was conducted to research the attitudes and needs of younger workers. The questionnaire was based on exploring broader issues in relation to the needs of differing groups of workers. Issues explored include age, demographic difference and how employers can work towards creating a harmonious work team. Following collection of the data, cross tabulations and cluster analysis were produced using the statistical package SPSS. Cluster analysis is a statistical technique used to segment the sample. For scientific details of cluster analysis, refer to the website http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/glosfra.html. The website explains the technique... “Cluster analysis is an exploratory data analysis tool which aims at sorting different objects into groups in a way that the degree of association between two objects is maximal if they belong to the same group and minimal otherwise.” This report summarises the findings of the total sample and each of the four clusters identified.
  75. 75. 72 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Confidence interval Figures throughout this report are subject to a confidence interval. The margin of error for this study is +/- 3%, as the sample is 1053. For example, if 50% of the population sample [n=200] gave a response, the actual confidence interval would be between 43% and 57%. Movements beyond this are statistically significant.
  76. 76. 73 Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA About Square Holes Square Holes is a progressive market research agency with a passion for supporting great branding, advertising and digital. We provide ‘illumination’, ‘testing’ and ‘monitoring’ based on solid and reliable evidence and marketing intelligence using surveys, focus groups and other methods of gathering insights. Branding: we love emotive brands. Not logos or nice names, but ‘brands’ with heart and soul. Brands that spark emotions and underpin consumer identity. A cult-like connection. Square Holes has a passion for supporting emotive brands. Advertising: we love inspiring advertising. The big problem is inspiring advertising is rare. Way too much advertising is mediocre or even pointless. Consumers are inspired by advertising with imagination. Square Holes has a passion for supporting inspiring advertising. Digital: we love empowering digital media. It is not about talking to. It is about engaging with. You do not have a captive audience. Digital media is largely confused and misguided. Imagination is essential. Square Holes has passion for supporting empowering digital media. Why Square Holes? 1. We are passionate about being the strategic voice of consumers [not commodity or factory researchers] 2. We are specialists in branding, advertising and digital media [not generalists] 3. We are creative in our approach to research, staff and outputs [not the same as other research firms] 4. We are solid in the evidence we collect to support our consulting [not guided by unsubstantiated opinions or advice] 5. We attract the best clients and staff 6. We are the best at what we do 7. We understand our clients 8. We provide professional service Research: We do awesome market research. Great research is rare. Not all research is equal. It is typically without vision or imagination. Research is about empathising with consumers, observing and truly hearing and engaging with their opinions. Insight: We provide great insight. Consumer insight does not have an on-off switch. It should be continuous, agile and proactive. What was hip a few months ago may now be passé. What was never possible is now an opportunity. Success is about being the best not one of the best. Engagement: We engage with consumers. We empower and embrace consumers. Powerful engagement tools, video, digital media, social networking… The new consumer is about ‘me’. Consulting: We are the voice of consumers. Our mandate is to keep things real. To cut the bullshit. Allow a window into the consumers’ truth. Tens of thousands of consumers talk to us every year about brands, advertising and digital media. Our team are in-tune with consumer trends, media and culture. Passion: Square Holes has a passion for research to inspire creativity allow clarity and support commitment. Square Holes a passion for partnering with clients to inspire creativity allow clarity and support commitment. Square Holes has a passion for engaging consumers, to inspire creativity allow clarity and support commitment. Square Holes has a passion for guiding clients to inspire creativity allow clarity and support commitment.
  77. 77. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA Questionnaire
  78. 78. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA THE GENERATION GAP Text for email: In the second half of 2007, Square Holes worked with the Australian Institute of Management South Australia and SA Great to conduct research into the attitudes and needs of younger workers [under 40 years of age]. The workplace retention research project commenced with a series of targeted focus groups, held to allow some initial brainstorming of the topic amongst young people representing professional services, science and technology and trades. The second stage of the project was an internet survey of 800 South Australian employees aged under 40. AIM SA, SA Great and Square Holes were thrilled with the response the survey generated, and are appreciative of the enthusiastic support. A copy of the Retention Survey Critical for SA Managers and Employers can be found on the AIM SA website, www.aimsa.com.au. Building on the success of the 2007 study, Square Holes is now working with AIM SA to explore broader issues in relation to the needs of differing groups of workers. The independent research will be in regard to people working together within the workplace. Issues to be explored include age, demographic differences and how employers can work towards creating a harmonious team. You are invited to participate. To qualify, you need to be aged over 18 years of age and be in paid employment. The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. After completing the full survey, you will go into a draw to win an AIM SA training voucher valued at $2,000 or one of three AIM SA training vouchers valued at $500. ………………………………. Screener A: ARE YOU 18 YEARS OR OLDER? S 1 Yes 2 No – terminate survey Screener B: ARE YOU CURRENTLY IN PAID EMPLOYMENT? S 1 Yes 2 No – terminate survey
  79. 79. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA JOB SATISFACTION 1. OVERALL, WITH ALL ASPECTS OF YOUR POSITION CONSIDERED, HOW HAPPY ARE YOU IN YOUR CURRENT JOB? 1 Extremely happy 2 Quite happy 3 Quite unhappy 4 Extremely unhappy HOW LIKELY ARE YOU TO BE WORKING FOR THE SAME EMPLOYER IN … 2. ONE YEAR … 1 Extremely likely – go to Q3 2 Quite likely – go to Q3 3 Quite unlikely – go to Q5 4 Extremely unlikely – go to Q5 3. TWO YEARS … 1 Extremely likely – go to Q4 2 Quite likely – go to Q4 3 Quite unlikely – go to Q5 4 Extremely unlikely – go to Q5 4. THREE YEARS … 1 Extremely likely – go to Q5 2 Quite likely – go to Q5 3 Quite unlikely – go to Q5 4 Extremely unlikely - go to Q5 5. HOW SECURE DO YOU FEEL IN YOUR CURRENT JOB? 1 Extremely secure – go to Q7 2 Quite secure – go to Q7 3 Quite insecure 4 Extremely insecure 6. WHY IS THIS? 1 Economic downturn 2 Lack of skills 3 Unstable employer 4 Age 5 Other [specify] 7. IF YOU WERE TO LOSE YOUR CURRENT POSITION, HOW LIKELY WOULD IT BE THAT YOU WILL FIND ANOTHER SIMILAR OR SUITABLE JOB? 1 Extremely likely – go to Q9 2 Quite likely – go to Q9 3 Quite unlikely 4 Extremely unlikely
  80. 80. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA 8. WHY IS THIS? 1 Economic downturn 2 Lack of skills 4 Age 5 Other [specify] TEAM – your immediate team 9. WHAT IS THE APPROXIMATE AGE OF YOUR DIRECT MANAGER OR SUPERVISOR? S 1 18-29 3 30-34 4 35-39 5 40-49 6 50-59 7 60-69 8 70+ 10. ARE THEY...S 1 Male 2 Female 11. OVERALL, HOW WELL WOULD YOU SAY THAT YOU WORK WITH YOUR DIRECT MANAGER OR SUPERVISOR? S 1 Extremely well 2 Quite well 3 Not very well 4 Not at all well 12. HOW MANY PEOPLE WORK WITHIN YOUR USUAL TEAM? [RATHER THAN YOUR BUSINESS UNIT THESE ARE THE PEOPLE YOU WOULD WORK WITH CLOSELY WITHIN A TYPICAL WEEK ] [specify] 13. HOW MANY... Males [specify] Females [specify] 14. HOW MANY... 18-29 [specify] 30-39 [specify] 40-49 [specify] 50-59 [specify] 60-69 [specify] 70+ [specify]
  81. 81. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA 15. OVERALL, HOW WELL WOULD YOU SAY THAT YOU WORK WITH YOUR TEAM? 1 Extremely well 2 Quite well 3 Not very well 4 Not at all well 16. WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO THINK OF ONE PERSON IN YOUR TEAM YOU WORK ‘BEST WITH’. WHY DO YOU WORK WELL WITH THIS PERSON? [specify] 17. WHAT IS THEIR... Age [specify] Gender [specify] Position [specify] 18. WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO THINK OF ONE PERSON IN YOUR TEAM YOU WORK ‘NOT SO WELL WITH’. YOU MAY LIKE THIS PERSON, YOU MAY JUST FIND THEM A LITTLE MORE DIFFICULT THAN OTHERS. WHY DO YOU NOT WORK SO WELL WITH THIS PERSON? [specify] 19. WHAT IS THEIR... Age [specify] Gender [specify] Position [specify] 20. IN YOUR CURRENT TEAM, WHAT IS THE APPROXIMATE AGE OF? The youngest person in the team [specify] The oldest person in the team [specify] 21. IF SOMEONE NEW JOINS YOUR TEAM [NEW TEAM MEMBER OR NEW MANAGER JOINING THE TEAM], WHAT WOULD BE THEIR IDEAL MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM AGE TO BEST FIT IN WITH THE CURRENT TEAM? New team member Ideal minimum age [specify] Ideal maximum age [specify] New manager Ideal minimum age [specify] Ideal maximum age [specify]
  82. 82. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA WHAT’S IMPORTANT IN YOUR WORKPLACE? EMPLOYER OFFERINGS 22. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING OFFERINGS IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE ABILITY TO PURCHASE EQUITY OF SHARES IN THE BUSINESS IN THE FUTURE 1 2 3 BONUS BASED ON COMPANY PERFORMANCE 1 2 3 BONUS BASED ON INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE 1 2 3 CAR ALLOWANCE 1 2 3 CAREER DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY 1 2 3 COMPANY PAID CREDIT CARD 1 2 3 DISCOUNT PROGRAMS 1 2 3 EDUCATION AND TRAINING 1 2 3 EQUITY OR SHARES IN THE BUSINESS NOW 1 2 3 FLEXIBILITY IN HOURS WORKED 1 2 3 GIFT VOUCHERS 1 2 3 GYM MEMBERSHIP 1 2 3 JOB SHARE 1 2 3 MEDICAL INSURANCE PAID 1 2 3 PAY / SALARY IS ABOVE AVERAGE COMPARED WITH OTHER EMPLOYERS 1 2 3 PAYMENT FOR OVERTIME AND ADDITIONAL HOURS WORKED 1 2 3 PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS PAID 1 2 3 REIMBURSEMENT EXPENSE ACCOUNT 1 2 3 RELOCATION ALLOWANCE 1 2 3 SALARY SACRIFICE OPTIONS 1 2 3 SCHOOL FEE SUBSIDY 1 2 3 TIME IN LIEU 1 2 3 VEHICLE LEASE PAID BY EMPLOYER 1 2 3
  83. 83. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT 23. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE ABILITY TO ATTEND 1-3 DAY EXTERNAL COURSES 1 2 3 CLOSE DEVELOPMENT RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MANAGER[S] 1 2 3 PAID TIME OFF TO UNDERTAKE TERTIARY STUDIES 1 2 3 FORMALISED INTERNAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 1 2 3 MENTORING PROGRAM 1 2 3 REGULAR ‘CONSTRUCTIVE’ PERFORMANCE REVIEWS 1 2 3 PAID TO ATTEND CONFERENCES 1 2 3 PAID TO ATTEND INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS NETWORKING EVENTS 1 2 3 TERTIARY STUDIES PAID FOR BY EMPLOYER 1 2 3 RESPONSIBILITY AND CHALLENGE 24. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT IS EACH OF THE FOLLOWING RESPONSIBILITY AND CHALLENGE ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE ABILITY TO HAVE STRATEGIC INPUT INTO BUSINESS 1 2 3 ALLOWS YOU TO BE CREATIVE 1 2 3 DIVERSITY OF RESPONSIBILITIES 1 2 3 ENCOURAGES YOU TO WORK AS A TEAM 1 2 3 FUTURE OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT AND MORE RESPONSIBILITY 1 2 3 MANAGEING OTHER STAFF 1 2 3 OPPORTUNITY TO DEAL WITH CLIENTS 1 2 3 OPPORTUNITY TO DEAL WITH MAJOR CLIENTS INDEPENDENTLY 1 2 3 OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH SENIOR MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 REWARD YOU FOR SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETING COMPLEX TASKS 1 2 3 TAKING ON HIGHER LEVEL COMPLEX TASKS 1 2 3 TRUST AND RESPECT IN YOUR ABILITIES 1 2 3
  84. 84. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA EMPLOYER IMAGE 25. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING EMPLOYER IMAGE ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE A REPUTATION AS AN EMPLOYER OF CHOICE 1 2 3 A VISION / MISSION YOU BELIEVE IN AND SUPPORT 1 2 3 CARES FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 1 2 3 CONTRIBUTES TO THE COMMUNITY 1 2 3 MARKETING AND ADVERTISING THAT APPEALS TO YOU 1 2 3 PLACES ITS EMPLOYEES NEEDS AS ESSENTIAL TO BUSINESS SUCCESS 1 2 3 STRONG BUSINESS PERFORMANCE 1 2 3 VISIBLE AND WELL KNOWN EMPLOYER AMONGST MOST AUSTRALIANS 1 2 3 VISIBLE AND WELL KNOWN EMPLOYER AMONGST MOST SOUTH AUSTRALIANS 1 2 3 VISIBLE AND WELL KNOWN EMPLOYER WITHIN YOUR INDUSTRY 1 2 3 WORK – LIFE BALANCE 26. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING WORK-LIFE BALANCE ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE A SUPPORTIVE POLICY FOR TIME OFF FOR SICK CHILDREN 1 2 3 ALLOWS WORKING FROM HOME 1 2 3 AN ACTIVE SOCIAL CLUB 1 2 3 EVENTS FOR STAFF AND FAMILIES 1 2 3 FLEXIBILITY IN HOURS TO FIT WITH PICKING-UP AND DROPPING OFF CHILDREN 1 2 3 HAS A FAMILY FRIENDLY POLICY 1 2 3 HAS A REASONABLE VIEW OF HOURS WORKED IN AN AVERAGE WEEK 1 2 3 OFFERS BREAK-AWAY OR CREATIVE AREAS FOR STAFF 1 2 3 PAID MATERNITY LEAVE 1 2 3 PAID PATERNITY LEAVE 1 2 3 PROVIDES PAID TIME OFF FROM TIME-TO-TIME IN ADDITION TO ANNUAL LEAVE ALLOWANCES 1 2 3 STAFF AND MANAGEMENT REGULARLY MEET FOR INFORMAL LUNCHES, DRINKS ETC. 1 2 3 WORKPLACE HAS A CHILD CARE CENTRE OR MINDING SERVICE 1 2 3
  85. 85. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA MANAGEMENT 27. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING MANAGEMENT ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE A STYLE THAT YOU RESPECT 1 2 3 ENCOURAGES STAFF TO FEEL HAPPY 1 2 3 FORWARD THINKING AND INNOVATIVE MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 FUN AND PERSONABLE MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 GOOD TEAM COORDINATOR 1 2 3 HAS REASONABLE STANDARDS FOR OUTPUT AND WORKLOAD 1 2 3 MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE THAT ALLOWS INPUT FROM ALL STAFF 1 2 3 MANAGEMENT THAT HAVE STAFF DEVELOPMENT AS A PRIMARY FOCUS 1 2 3 MANAGEMENT WILLING TO DELEGATE RESPONSIBILITIES 1 2 3 RESPECTFUL MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 TREATS YOU AS AN INDIVIDUAL 1 2 3 TRUSTWORTHY MANAGEMENT 1 2 3 WELL RESPECTED AND INTELLIGENT 1 2 3 STRONG COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS 1 2 3 WORK ENVIRONMENT 28. HOW IMPORTANT OR UNIMPORTANT ARE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING WORK ENVIROMENT ISSUES IN ENCOURAGEING YOU TO STAY WITH AN EMPLOYER OR MOVE TO ANOTHER EMPLOYER? THESE MAY OR MAY NOT BE OFFERED BY YOUR CURRENT EMPLOYER. Rotate order EXTREMELY IMPORTANT QUITE IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT / DON’T CARE A CASUAL AND FRIENDLY WORK ENVIRONMENT 1 2 3 A PARTITIONED AREA 1 2 3 AN ENVIRONMENT THAT ENCOURAGES STAFF TO BE CREATIVE 1 2 3 AN ENVIRONMENT THAT ENCOURAGES STAFF TO BE PRODUCTIVE 1 2 3 CAR PARKING AVAILABLE FOR STAFF [OR PAID BY EMPLOYER] 1 2 3 COMFORTABLE 1 2 3 MODERN OFFICE DESIGN 1 2 3 NO FIXED OFFICE / MOBILE OFFICE 1 2 3 OPEN-PLAN OFFICE SPACE 1 2 3 QUIET AREAS 1 2 3 RELAXATION AREAS 1 2 3 SAFE 1 2 3 WORKING OUTSIDE 1 2 3 YOUR OWN OFFICE 1 2 3
  86. 86. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA UNIQUENESS 29. WHAT MAKES YOU UNIQUE TO OTHER EMPLOYEES IN YOUR WORKPLACE? THIS MAY BE DIFFERENCES DUE TO YOUR AGE, GENDER, STAGE OF LIFE OR OTHER FACTORS? Record up to three [specify] [specify] [specify] PROFILE QUESTIONS NOW JUST A COUPLE OF DETAILS ABOUT YOURSELF FOR ANALYSIS PURPOSES… 30. WHAT IS YOUR AGE GROUP? 1 18-29 3 30-34 4 35-39 5 40-49 6 50-59 7 60-69 8 70+ 31. HOW OLD DO YOU ‘FEEL’ IN REGARDS TO YOUR BODY, MIND AND SOUL? 1 18-29 3 30-34 4 35-39 5 40-49 6 50-59 7 60-69 8 70+ 32. IF YOU FEEL YOUNGER THAN YOUR AGE, WHAT IS THE REASON FOR THIS? [specify] 33. IF YOU FEEL OLDER THAN YOUR AGE, WHAT IS THE REASON FOR THIS? [specify] 34. WHAT BRACKET WOULD YOUR PERSONAL ANNUAL INCOME FALL INTO? 1 UP TO $20,000 3 $20,001 TO $30,000 4 $30,001 TO $40,000 5 $40,001 TO $50,000 6 $50,001 TO $60,000 7 $60,001 TO $80,000 8 MORE THAN $80,000 10 Refuse to say
  87. 87. Copyright 2009 Australia. Square Holes Pty Ltd and Australian Institute of Management SA 35. ARE YOU … 1 Male 2 Female 36. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING BEST DESCRIBES YOUR HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION? 1 Young single person living alone 2 Young single share house 3 Young couple 4 Young family, with all children primary school aged or younger 5 Middle family, with child still living at home high school aged or older 6 Mature family, with all children living at home older than high school age 7 Mature couple 8 Mature single 37. WHAT IS YOUR HIGHEST EDUCATION LEVEL? 1 High school 2 Apprentice 3 VET qualification 4 Bachelor degree 5 Masters or higher 6 Refused/Don’t know 38. WHAT IS YOUR OCCUPATION? [specify] 39. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING APPLY TO YOU … S 1 CEO/MD 2 Senior management [i.e. regional/divisional manager] 3 Functional management [unit / area] 4 First level management [i.e. office manager/shift supervisor] 5 Office administration 6 Assistant/Junior 7 Refused/Don’t know

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