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Scope of packaging technology management of dairy based products

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Scope of packaging technology management of dairy based products

  1. 1. SCOPE OF PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT OF DAIRY BASED PRODUCTS FOOD PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY(FOT577) ASHIQUE MOHAMMED: 12207397 HIMANSHU BANA: 12208165 SAFLAH K: 12208656 AVANI MOHAN: 12209565
  2. 2. WHAT IS COLD CHAIN ? A supply chain network that regulates low temperatures is known as a cold chain. In order to keep quality within a desired low-temperature range, a continuous series of refrigerated production method, storage facilities, transportation and distribution, along with related equipment and logistics, is known as an unbroken cold chain. Products including fresh agricultural produce, seafood, frozen food, photographic film, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals are all preserved, their shelf lives are increased, and they can all benefit from their utilization.
  3. 3. COLD CHAIN MANAGEMENT Cold chain management is a system that manages the various steps of the cycle of perishable products through effective monitoring and planning, and by using appropriate processes and activities to reduce production costs, reduce waste, increase quality, reduce toxicity, increase customer satisfaction and also increase the income of producers and other businesses active in the market of perishable products. Whenever the cold chain is broken in food products, they lose their commercial value and become waste. The cold chain is the first idea that comes to mind when thinking about fast perishable food transportation. All transit, storage, handling, and other logistics operations must maintain the heat levels required for the safety of cold chain products.
  4. 4. OBJECTIVES OF CCM  Eliminate food safety risks  Reduce thermal abuse within the cold chain  Increase food quality  Increase the shelf life of food products  Eliminate finger pointing between franchisee, distributor and supplier  Increase cold chain efficiency and productivity  Extend product shelf life
  5. 5. BENEFITS OF COLD CHAIN • Better Product Quality in terms of nutritional value, color, texture. • No Bacterial formation takes place due to proper cold storage conditions. • Maintenance of hygiene. • Maintained Humidity. • Longer Storage of product/extension of Shelf life. • Value for Money. • Development of packaging industry. • Address the issue of traceability. • Better handling and Hygiene practices. • Inventory management and automation. • Palletized handling and racking. • The growth of refrigerated transport industry.
  6. 6. COLD CHAIN PACKAGING The proper temperature ranges for cold chain items are maintained by carefully chosen cold chain packaging solutions. perishable foods must be kept at the right temperature to ensure their safety and longevity. There are many different businesses that use cold chain packaging, and these industries frequently have particular needs for their assets' cold chain monitoring. However, securing critical temperature- sensitive assets during shipment requires more than just cold chain packing. In order to maintain assets within predetermined parameters, cold chain packaging solutions are used. the inside items are kept cool through the use of insulation and other materials. Due of their temperature sensitivity, they are frequently used for the delivery of meat, seafood, medications, and other health products
  7. 7. PACKING RULES IN COLD CHAIN MANAGEMENT  The product should be whole  The product must be intact (those that become unsuitable for consumption by decomposition and deterioration should not affect the product)  The product must be clean (free from visible foreign matter)  The product should be of color and shape specific to the variety  The product should be in the specific taste and smell  The product should not have ruptures or ruptures for fruits and vegetables  There should be no sunburn on the product shell  There shall be no damage to the shell or outer surface due to low temperature for the product fruit and vegetables,
  8. 8. DAIRY PRODUCTS AND THEIR PACKAGING Fluid milk Water, proteins, lipids, minerals, carbs, vitamins, hormones, and other minor ingredients make up the liquid matrix that is milk. At room temperature, milk quickly loses its quality and safety due to its high perishability. Compared to what was the case in the 20th century, classic glass bottles are now used to store milk less frequently. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) jugs, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) bottles, high impact polystyrene (HIPS) tubs, low-density polyethylene (LLDPE/LDPE) pouches, paper-coated containers, and other multi-layered composite materials, which could be made entirely of polymers or a combination of polymers and aluminium foil, are the main materials used today for milk packaging
  9. 9. EVAPORATED MILK The generic term for sterilised unsweetened condensed milk, or fresh cow's milk with around 60% less water, is evaporated milk. The conventional and still popular packaging for evaporated milk is a metal can. These cans are made mostly of steel, but to protect them from rust or attack by the packaged product, most cans are tinplated, enamel , epoxy-coated, or lacquered. To further prevent tin or iron from leaking into the food and impairing the nutritional value or sensory qualities of the milk, certain cans with tin plating are covered with a polymeric layer.
  10. 10. Sweetened Condensed Milk Sterilized, sweetened evaporated milk is referred to as sweetened condensed milk. Sweetened condensed milk is created by evaporating, homogenizing, and seeding fresh whole milk with lactose. It has sucrose and/or dextrose as sweeteners. The product is typically packaged in tin-plated, steel, or aluminum cans for retail sales. sales. These serve as effective gas and light barriers and can endure sterilization and pasteurization procedures. Before usage, cans are flame-sterilized, and then they are filled in an enclosed space with filtered fresh air. By taking these measures, mold spore pollution is avoided. small portion packs composed of metal, laminated plastic and aluminum foil, plastic tubes and aluminum-lined "milk" cartons are used.
  11. 11. Powdered Milk If prepared and stored properly, powdered milk can have a long shelf life. Dried items must be packaged in a gas and moisture-impermeable container in a dark, cool, and dry places to ensure maximum storage quality. Milk powders must be stored in containers that guard against contamination from air, light, insects, moisture, and other foreign substances. Because milk powder has a high degree of hygroscopicity, moisture is the main element affecting its quality. Milk powder is often packaged using a combination of multilayer Kraft paper and a single layer of polyethylene lining. metal barrels with bags of polyethylene lining or for the packing of milk powder, cans with an aluminum foil barrier are also employed.
  12. 12. Ice Cream Milk, sugars, stabilizers, emulsifiers, and flavors are all ingredients use in ice cream preparation. Extra components like eggs, colors, and starch hydrolysates can also be added. Before freezing, the mixture is homogenized and pasteurized. For a final product that is smooth and soft, freezing entails quick cooling combined with intense agitation to include air. Ice cream is most frequently sold in bulk packaging for use as a dipping product, including individual cones, or in consumer packaging for on-the-spot retail sales. In single-service containers, some of which are made of reusable plastic, bulk frozen desserts are packaged.
  13. 13. Butter Butter is a solid-like emulsion of fat and water. It is produced from sugar or cream that has been acidified, with a maximum of 16% water and 80–90% milk fat. Butter is typically packaged for retail sales in wet waxed, dry waxed, grease-proof or vegetable parchment paper, as well as aluminum foil laminated with either of those materials. Dairy spreads are typically sold in thermoformed polypropylene or LDPE containers with lids made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene, or aluminum foil. Blocks of bulk butter weighing 25 kg are packaged in LDPE-lined paperboard containers. It is sometimes packaged in metal cans for long-term storage
  14. 14. Cheese Cheese is a wet, dense protein gel that also contains fat. Its production uses milk gelatin. For retail sales, cheese is typically first packaged in a primary container, then in a secondary container. Thermoplastic polymer laminates, cardboard, cardboard covered in plastic, cardboard covered in aluminium foil, and waxes are examples of primary packaging. The chemistry, number, and thickness of the layers of the laminate materials can also vary. Additionally, there are layers made to prevent oxygen diffusion. These include substances like nylon, PVDC, and ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH). Laminates made of of aluminium foil have very little permeability to gases and water vapour. Cheeses are offered in portion packs the same as other dairy goods. Small cut chunks, slices, or individually wrapped cheese sticks are available for consumption.
  15. 15. TEMPERATURE AND SHELF LIFE OF CHILLED AND FROZEN FOODS Temperature control protects the sensory and nutritional properties of foods. For example, vitamin C losses in vegetables can reach 10% per day when kept at 2°C, while they can reach over 50% per day when kept at temperatures of 20°C. Numerous factors can cause freeze damage, which causes a product's quality to decline after thawing. Quality decline can be detected in the freezer burn, discolouring, and mechanical damage can all occur in frozen food, but in many situations, the quality loss is not apparent until the food has been cooked and thawed. The majority of quality loss processes are influenced by storage temperature and become more pronounced the longer time is spent over the advised value. Changes in temperature also encourage them.
  16. 16. COLD CHAIN MANAGEMENT – TRANSPORT  The word "cold chain" is used to describe how food is handled and distributed when it is kept at an appropriate temperature from harvest through the freezing or chilling process to the point of sale. This involves storage of various kinds, transportation, and display.  AIR TRANSPORTATION : makes it feasible to deliver very perishable and valuable goods quickly across vast distances, but it is unable to control the environment to the same extent as other modes. The quality of the goods will be heavily reliant on timely and speedy treatment at the airports, even while hold temperature in-flight storage will be at, even though it may be fairly low over most of the journey.
  17. 17.  SEA AND INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION : Initially, insulated holds that were incorporated inside the ships were used for sea cargo. Few of these now exist because of the high handling expenses, and the majority of maritime trade now employs containers that are either connected to the vessel's central refrigeration system or have their own unique cooling plants. “Reefer” is the common term used to refer to an ISO container. The most common lengths for ISO containers are 20 feet and 40 feet. The normal width is 8 feet, the usual heights are 8 feet 6 inches and 9 feet 6 inches. Normal conditions call for cooling, however there are times when heating may be required. Usually, you may adjust the box temperature to the right level for the particular shipment, and the built-in control system takes care of maintaining the temperature. For example, bananas should be stored at 13.5°C, some chilled and fresh fruit at 0.5°C, frozen meat at 18°C, and frozen fish or ice cream at 29°C.
  18. 18.  ROAD AND RAIL TRANSPORT: Reefer trailers are articulated semi-trailers that can be up to 15.5 meters long, have an internal volume of 73 m3, and can hold up to 40 tons. The majority of cooling units are factory manufactured, come with a diesel engine for usage on the road, and occasionally contain an electric motor that can be powered by mains power when the vehicle is stationary. Magnetic clutches are used for drive change. Capacity flexibility is provided by an open-drive compressor and variable engine speeds.
  19. 19. CHALLENGES FACED IN COLD CHAIN FOR DAIRY DISTRIBUTION  LACK OF CAPITAL  POOR INFRASTRUCTURE  LACK OF INVESTMENTS IN COLD CHAIN  ABSENCE OF OFFICIAL CONTROL AND SUPERVISION ON COLD CHAIN  SHORTAGE OF SKILLED LABOUR  TEMPERATURE ABUSE
  20. 20. IMPROVEMENT OF COLD CHAIN FOR DAIRY DISTRIBUTION  OFFERING RIGHT POLICIES AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS  PROVISION OF SUITABLE COST COOLING EQUIPMENTS  ENCOURAGE OF COOPERATIVES FORMATION  PROVISION OF GOOD EXTENSION SERVICES  PROVISION OF MODERN COOLING SYSTEMS
  21. 21. SCOPE OF COLD CHAIN MANAGEMENT IN DAIRY PRODUCTS  Cold Storage:Storage facilities for commodities and products awaiting transportation. Storage space is where temperature is low.  Cooling Systems:Systems that process, store, and transport food while maintaining it at the proper temperature along the whole supply chain. Processing, storing, and transporting are the supply chain.  Cold Transport:Ensures goods remain at a stable temperature and the required humidity levels  Cold Processing:Facilities that allow for processing goods with hygienic environment.  Cold Distribution:Deals with loading boxes or crates and pallets to distribute goods.
  22. 22. THANK YOU.…

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