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See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/365302731
Ae...
Prepared
by/
Dr.
Fatma
Ibrahim
Abdel-latif
Megahed
Lecturer
of
Family
and
community
health
nursing
at
Suez
Canal
Universit...
Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti) is one of the main species responsible
for the transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens worldw...
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Climate change & Aedes aegypti

  1. 1. See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/365302731 Aedes aegypti & Climate Change Presentation · November 2022 DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.35282.43207 CITATIONS 0 READS 7 1 author: Some of the authors of this publication are also working on these related projects: Guar gum & Iron deficiency anemia among the patients with inflammatory bowel disease View project Fatma Ibrahim Abdel-Latif Megahed Suez Canal University 35 PUBLICATIONS 7 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE All content following this page was uploaded by Fatma Ibrahim Abdel-Latif Megahed on 11 November 2022. The user has requested enhancement of the downloaded file.
  2. 2. Prepared by/ Dr. Fatma Ibrahim Abdel-latif Megahed Lecturer of Family and community health nursing at Suez Canal University, 2022 Aedes aegypti & Climate Change
  3. 3. Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti) is one of the main species responsible for the transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens worldwide. It is a highly competent vector for dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. Many developing countries have ideal climatic conditions for Ae. aegypti development and struggle with diseases transmitted by this species.
  4. 4. It is restricted to warm, urban environments where it breeds around houses and in man-made containers. It may be due to a number of factors, including a lack of basic health services, precarious public health systems, precipitation patterns, the altitude, and human impacts as population growth, and intensive and uncontrolled urbanization.
  5. 5. Incorporating socio-economic factors, the global distribution and abundance show pronounced clustering of the vectors around densely populated urban areas, reflected by the abundance of potential food (blood meals) and human-created larval sites. However, an overwintering population of Ae. aegypti adults was recently located near Washington D.C. (USA), which has an average winter temperature lower than what has previously shown to be the limit for the development of this species.
  6. 6. Also, temperature is a crucial factor impacting the distribution of this vector, climate change is likely to impact its range. The increase in the abundance of this vector correlates closely with the global temperature increase. A rise in temperature directly affect the size of vector populations and increase the number of diseases, such as vector-borne diseases and the incidence of epidemics of water-borne diseases.
  7. 7.  Both species’ eggs are resistant to desiccation, allowing them to survive unfavorable conditions and contributing to their ability to spread to new areas via the national and international transportation of materials (e.g., tires, plant pots) containing viable but dormant eggs.
  8. 8.  Climate change is expected to result in major shifts in vector distribution and/or in the expansion of geographical ranges of both mosquito species with a potential health impact on local populations of humans and other animals due to an enhanced transmission rate of pathogens, including dengue and Zika (Zika virus also belongs to the family flavivirus and resembles dengue so much that it could almost be referred to as the “fifth dengue serotype”) .
  9. 9.  According to the World Health Organization, dengue virus complex, which refers to the four serotypes that cause dengue fever, is the fastest spreading arbovirus; estimates show that 390 million people are currently infected per year, while 3.9 billion are considered at risk.  Dengue and chikungunya fever pose a major risk with frequent or continuous outbreaks. Both of them cause flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and nausea, but chikungunya can cause severe joint pain and rarely causes death.
  10. 10.  No vaccine is currently available to prevent chikungunya, so vector control and personal protection from mosquito bites are the main methods for avoiding disease transmission. While vaccines to prevent dengue infections are being developed, with one currently on the market, but only individuals who are seropositive are recommended to receive the vaccine.  Efforts to minimize greenhouse gas emissions, such as land restoration and combating deforestation, are useful for reducing the occurrence of Ae. aegypti and other insect vectors.
  11. 11. Mangrove habitat is rich in detritus surface and high in organic soil content which feeds mosquito larvae. Opinions about the function of mangrove forests as a barrier to prevent mosquitoes from flying to the settlement areas is being debated therefore following future study is needed to confirm that.
  12. 12. Mangrove Reforestation
  13. 13.  A new study finds mangrove soil held around 6.4 billion metric tons of carbon in 2000. Mangroves provide massive benefits in addition to storing carbon, reducing flooding and erosion from storms, acting as nurseries for fish, and filtering pollutants from water.  They help filter river water of pollutants and trap excess sediment before it reaches the ocean. Their role as fish nurseries can have big impacts on local economies and food production.
  14. 14. Resources: . 7 - 05473 - 022 - 13071 /s 10.1186 . org/ https://doi https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6316560/. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2019.00148/full. - s 3 www.e https:// sconf 3 /e 05016 _ 2020 sconf_icenis 3 /e 62 / 2020 sconf/abs/ 3 conferences.org/articles/e .html 05016 _ 2020 _icenis https://news.mongabay.com/2018/05/new-study-finds-mangroves-may-store-way- more-carbon-than-we-thought/
  15. 15. View publication stats

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