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Leading Change in Your Organization

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Leading Change in Your Organization

  1. 1. Leading Change in Your Organization Steve Buttry February 3, 2016 SPJ
  2. 2. • Tradition = producing newspaper or newscast • Mission = covering news, serving as watchdog Tradition vs. mission
  3. 3. Tradition vs. mission • Tradition often dictates priorities • Tradition often dictates workflow • Tradition commands time, resources • Tradition is tied to platform, mission isn’t • Tradition discourages experimentation • Mission requires experimentation
  4. 4. • Mission = What we should be doing • Tradition = How we’ve always done it Tradition vs. mission
  5. 5. Roles in leading change Top editor, news director: Proclaim mission, set priorities, pull staff toward goals that support mission Mid-level managers: Emphasize mission in daily staff work Front-line journalists: Experiment, take risks, push colleagues (and bosses)
  6. 6. Action drives change • Organization may need to change • But org chart won’t change culture • Newsroom culture’s defaults override structural changes • Change what you do, how you work • Let org chart changes support change
  7. 7. Change what you do • News coverage (live) • Storytelling (interactive) • Processes: digital workflow, then feed legacy product(s) • Engage community • Use products on mobile, produce content for mobile community
  8. 8. Planning meetings Print: Focus primarily on the next day’s newspaper, Sunday paper and upcoming print centerpiece stories Broadcast: Focus on evening newscast(s), sweeps Digital: Morning meeting focuses on day’s coverage plans, mobile, social, early traffic & engagement. Enterprise meetings plan interactive elements, video, data and other content that will require significant planning.
  9. 9. Encourage risk • What have you experimented on lately? • If experiment was a success, did you share lessons & experiment again? • If experiment was a failure, did you share lessons, reward risk & try again? • Are people in your newsroom willing to experiment?
  10. 10. Breaking news • Breaking news coverage completely independent of print & broadcast products & deadlines • Publish as soon as you verify • Update frequently • Liveblog big, breaking stories • Tweet, Tout & update from scene
  11. 11. Event coverage Livetweet & liveblog everything: • Sports events • Meetings • Trials • Festivals • Press conferences • Need a compelling reason not to
  12. 12. Deadlines, processes Legacy: Reporters & photographers produce stories & photos for print & broadcast deadlines. Digital: Even non- breaking routine news is published as the stories unfold, often with multiple updates during the day. Editors assign deadlines as early as possible for the first takes of stories.
  13. 13. Routine daily news • Setting early deadlines (8 a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m.) • Starting work earlier • Write routine stories as they unfold, as we do w/ breaking stories (initial post followed by updates)
  14. 14. Enterprise Print: Enterprise stories are usually Sunday stories, planned & reported close to the vest. Broadcast: Enterprise stories during sweeps. Digital: Enterprise stories are crowdsourced, planning includes interactive features, video, social promotion. Published during the week when ready.
  15. 15. The Five Satins • Story published online Monday • Text story twice as long online (60” in print) • Loaded with links • Videos • Audio clips • Use Sunday story for more engagement
  16. 16. • Quizzes • Timelines • Maps • Interactive databases • Data visualization • Multimedia storytelling tools • Before & after photos • Animation • Curation Interactive enterprise
  17. 17. Measuring success • What’s important? How can you measure it? • Not just page views & uniques • Social sharing & engagement, time spent w/ stories • Number of live & interactive stories, their engagement
  18. 18. Addressing obstacles • Technology: Clunky CMS (invest or use open-source solution?) • View website & social media as promotion, not journalism platforms (training, recognition & rewards) • Morale (praise journalistic & digital excellence)
  19. 19. If you’re in charge … • Use mobile app/site & ask mobile- focused questions • Visibly learn new tools (& show humility) • Form committee to study pressing innovation needs (mobile, social …) • Conversation should reflect mission • Chat up newsroom innovation leaders
  20. 20. Praise must reflect mission • Are you praising risk-takers? Innovation leaders? • What you praise reflects your priorities • Praise should be specific & tied to specifics of mission • Yes, you should praise people for “just doing their jobs”
  21. 21. “But I’m not in charge” • What can you do in your job (consistent w/ policy, moving mission ahead)? • Can you offer to train or mentor colleagues (formal workshops, informal coaching)? • Can you pitch ideas, experiments to a sympathetic boss?
  22. 22. Links and slides • stevebuttry.wordpress.com • slideshare.org/stevebuttry Contact info: stephenbuttry@gmail.com @stevebuttry

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