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Risk assessment template

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Risk assessment template

  1. 1. Harris Academy South Norwood MEDIA Risk Assessment Record Tamanna and Zachery Studio, Bus, on the roadProduction / Location of Shoot:Person(s) involved: Music video and photo shoot Location Contact No: 020 8405 5070Activity or process: Date of Assessment: JanuaryShoot Date(s): January - March Director’s / Student(s) Tamanna Miah Signature: A: HAZARDS B: DEGREE OF RISK C: PREVENTIVE MEASURES D: IF ACCIDENT OCCURS? In the studio (Refer to Risk Matrix) Nature of hazard Person(s) at Severity Likelihood Risk Measures in place aimed at reducing Further necessary measures, involving risk Rating risk to minimum level? whom and by when? (See below) • Tripping over equipment 1. Cast Major Possible C Tape down the wires on the floor or Have a teacher supervise the inside the and wires around the edges of the room room or outside • Getting hit by the door 2. Crew Major Possible C Have equipment at the back of the room Have the number for the ambulance or • Over crowded Minor Possible D away from the performance local hospital Tidy the room so there’s more space Have a first aid kit with the equipments and less things to trip over Have access to teachers around the Have a sign on the door that says there perimeter if filming going on so they can knock before entering We can mark out spots for where the singer and dance crew have to stand so that they are not in danger of tripping over or getting too close to the camera when its moving around the room to get different shots
  2. 2. A: HAZARDS B: DEGREE OF RISK C: PREVENTIVE MEASURES D: IF ACCIDENT OCCURS? On the bus (Refer to Risk Matrix) Nature of hazard Person(s) at Severity Likelihood Risk Measures in place aimed at reducing Further necessary measures, involving risk Rating risk to minimum level? whom and by when? (See below) • Tripping over equipment 3. Cast Major Possible C Have everyone know where to go/stand Have a teacher supervise • Crashing in to each other Major Possible C so no one bumps in to each other Have the number for the ambulance or • Falling down the stairs of 4. Crew Major Possible C Keep equipment to one place on the bus local hospital the bus Have a first aid kit with the equipments Have access to teachers around the perimeter A: HAZARDS B: DEGREE OF RISK C: PREVENTIVE MEASURES D: IF ACCIDENT OCCURS? On the road, street (Refer to Risk Matrix) Nature of hazard Person(s) at Severity Likelihood Risk Measures in place aimed at reducing Further necessary measures, involving risk Rating risk to minimum level? whom and by when? (See below) • Getting hit by a car 5. Cast Major Possible B Find a place where few cars and people Have a teacher supervise • People walking by Major Possible C are known to pass by Have the number for the ambulance or getting hit by the 6. Crew local hospital equipment or us Have a first aid kit with the equipments Have access to teachers around the perimeterPersons at risk include: Cas – Cast Cre - Crew Fam - Family Pub - Public Stu - Students Tut - Tutor(s) Vis - Visitors
  3. 3. The “Risk Matrix” or Table of Overall RiskThe Risk Matrix is a useful tool in the assessment of the severity of overall risk. It is intended to allow the relationship between the likelihood ofincident/injury occurring and the possible severity of outcome. By comparing these two factors against each other, a Risk Rating can be arrived at,employing a scale between ‘A’ (highest risk) and ‘E’ (lowest risk).Risk Likely Rating, on a scale of ‘A’ to ‘E’ (‘A’ being the highest) Likely Risk Rating, on a scale of ‘A’ to ‘E’ (‘A’ being the highest) severity of outcome Frequent Probable Possible Remote UnlikelyFatal A B+ C+ D+ E+Major B+ B C D EMinor C+ C D D ENon- Reportable D+ D D E EExplanation of severity of outcome (For definitions and full list of inclusions, refer to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous OccurrenceRegulations (RIDDOR) 1995):Fatal - any fatal injuries to employees, or any other person, sustained in an accident connected with your businessMajor - any injury that includes:· Fracture of the skull, spine, pelvis, any bone in the arms or legs (but not in the hand or foot).· Amputations of the hand or foot, or of a finger, thumb or toe where the bone or joint is severed.· Loss of sight in an eye, or a penetrating injury, chemical / hot burn to the eye.· Electric shock resulting in loss of consciousness and / or medical treatment.· Acute illness or loss of consciousness resulting from absorption, inhalation or ingestion of a substance.· Any other injury requiring hospitalization for more than 24 hours.Minor - any other injury to an individual that results in absence from work, or an inability to carry out their normal works, for more than 3 days.Non-Reportable - any injury or discomfort that does not cause more than 3 days’ disablement, or permanent damage.
  4. 4. Note: “Ill Health”, i.e. loss of hearing, respiratory illness, dermatitis etc. should be rated on their likely severity.For each section of the Risk Assessment Record form above,it is recommended that the assessor(s) refer to the notes below for an outline of the main requirements of the questions:• Activity or Process - Basically you are required to state the physical nature of the activity.This can either be a generic activity such as “booking out kit”, or a more specific activity such as “filming in a moving car” or other more specialized activities; so ifnecessary try to describe it as best as possible.For example: “erection and use of lights in living room for fight scene”.• Nature of Hazard? - Concentrate upon things that could cause harm, not trivial things like flaky paintwork!Consult the people who use the area as they may have a different perspective to you.Do not rely solely upon others however, as they have become “blinkered” to certain hazards through daily exposure to them.• Who may be at risk? - Identify types / groups and numbers of people, and perhaps individuals.It could be “crew” in general, or more specific groups such as cast or guest interviewees who are not familiar with the location.• Degree of risk - Compare the likely outcome (worst case scenario if you like) against the likelihood of it occurring (unlikely through to frequent). Award a rating from A(high) down to E (very low).Refer to the Risk Matrix above for risk rating.• Preventive (Existing Control Measures) - Identify the measures already in place and ask yourself if they are sufficient to eliminate or reduce the risk to the lowestpossible degree?It is not always possible to entirely eliminate a hazard, as they are often intrinsic to a piece of equipment (such as a tungsten light) or an activity (such as driving).• Preventive (Further Measures Required) - Is there a possibility of circumstances arising that could lead to additional unforeseen risk?If so, how could these be pre-empted and addressed before they cause harm? If change is planned, what associated hazards could arise? Could adverse weatherconditions or a sudden influx of people result in additional hazards?• If Accident Occurs – it is essential that plans are in place if any accident occurs, whether it be fatal, major, minor, or even some non-reportable outcomes.This would normally take the form of having a record of emergency numbers of cast and crew, contacting the college and the media department, and calling theemergency services as required.This Risk Assessment Document has been approved by DateL. BRYANT Dec 2011

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