The UC San Diego AntiViral Research Center sponsors weekly presentations by infectious disease clinicians, physicians and ...
Improving the Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variabl...
Health Care Hierarchy 
Patients 
Administration 
Medical Provider 
Dictate health care 
Provide health care
Reality of Health Care 
Patients 
Administration 
Medical Provider
Satisfaction in Health Care 
Patients 
Administration 
Medical Provider
What about medical provider satisfaction?
Is being satisfied enough? 
What is satisfaction? 
How is satisfaction defined?
Concept #1 – Satisfaction vs. Fulfillment 
• 
Satisfaction occurs when we accomplish or complete a task or goal(s) for eit...
If we feel fulfilled in what we do in our lives, we can extend that feeling to everything and everyone we touch in our liv...
How do you become more fulfilled in your life? 
Is fulfillment even possible? 
Are you fulfilled in your life?
Who came first? The Chicken or the Egg? 
Image from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/18366310953404890/
Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception 
“Primary Point” of Perception 
Who is doing the perception 
...
Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception 
HIV 
“Primary Point” of Perception Who is doing the percepti...
Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception 
Five physical senses 
“Primary Point” of Perception Who is d...
Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception 
Five physical senses 
“Primary Point” of Perception Who is d...
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
Secondary Point 
• 
Satisfaction 
Primary Point...
Why are medical providers dissatisfied and burning out?
What causes provider burnout? 
YOU 
Work Environment 
Insurance Companies 
Technology/ EMRs 
Patients 
Staff/ Co-workers 
...
External Stressors 
YOU 
Work Environment 
Insurance Companies 
Technology/ EMRs 
Patients 
Staff/ Co-workers 
Administrat...
YOU 
Internal Stressors 
= Brain Chatter, negative thoughts, unresolved thoughts, preconceptions, biases, expectations, ou...
Image from http://ragamuffinstudies.blogspot.com/2007/11/physical-activity-necessary-component.html 
Have you ever had the...
External and Internal Stressors 
YOU 
Work Environment 
Insurance Companies 
Technology 
Patients 
Staff/ Co-workers 
Admi...
Do these external and internal stressors affect your ability to provide quality care for your patients? 
Absolutely yes!
What we bring to others (including patients) comes from within us. 
If you are not well within, how can you help others?
Why does burnout occur? Burnout occurs when one is not able to be unaffected by persistent, repetitive negative stimuli (i...
What can you do to prevent burnout? You can escape from external stressors, but can you run away from your negative intern...
Concept #3 – Empathy vs. Compassion 
• 
Empathy occurs with the unhealthy acceptance (conscious or unconscious) of someone...
Healthy 
Unhealthy 
Scale of Health: Empathy vs. Compassion 
10 987654321 
YOU 
PATIENT 
EMPATHY When you empathize, you c...
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
Secondary Point 
• 
Satisfaction...
How do you learn to become less affected in your patient care interactions through compassion?
Let’s start by examining the current challenges in the patient-provider interaction
Before the interaction
What do your patients want from a medical provider interaction? 
• 
Patients want a medical provider 
• 
To be present and...
What do medical providers want from a patient care interaction? 
• 
Medical providers want a patient 
• 
To listen 
• 
To ...
Preconceived thoughts and brain chatter can affect the patient care interaction 
Image from http://www.cmgwealth.com/ri/tr...
Is a patient or a medical provider truly “present” and “open-minded” if there are too many things on your mind at the same...
How can communication occur between two people if there is distraction by the presence of brain chatter and preconceived i...
Is this why patients only retain 10-20% of the information that they hear from a medical visit? Is this also why patients ...
Since we cannot control anyone else other than ourselves, we can only look at our own thoughts and preconceived ideas
Preconceptions of Patients & Providers 
Patient 
• 
Expectations 
• 
Fears 
• 
How the interaction will go based on prior ...
During the interaction
Answer #3 – When you meet with a patient, what is the most important thing to pay attention to in order to determine what ...
Why is your perception of a patient’s mental state critical in a patient care interaction? 
Mental health affects physical...
Concept #4 – Mental Health vs. Physical Health 
• 
Mental health 
• 
Defined as a mental state of well-being 
• 
Goal is t...
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
• 
Mental health 
Secondary Poin...
Redefining Perception 
• 
“Perception” may be defined as: 
• 
“the way you think about someone or something”1 
• 
Example:...
We think about what we don’t understand, but we feel what we know
Concept #5 – Conception vs. Perception 
• 
Conception occurs when you do not understand something and you think (create or...
Image from http://www.miscopono.com/2012/12/we-cannot-solve-our-problems-with-same.html
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
• 
Mental health 
• 
Perception ...
So why is it important to use your individual perception in patient care? 
• 
When you use your perception, 
• 
You learn ...
What can you do to improve the patient-provider interaction?
You enter a dark room and in the center is a lit candle. Which of the following do you think is correct? Raise your hand. ...
You enter a dark room and in the center is a lit candle. Which of the following do you feel is correct? Raise your hand. Y...
When you think, it usually is about something (outside of us) 
Image from http://www.cmgwealth.com/ri/trade-signals-what-i...
When we mentally feel, we gauge how we feel internally (within us). 
Image from http://fontmeme.com/emoticons/
Concept #6 – Thinking vs. Feeling 
• 
Asking patients about what they think vs. how they feel can yield very different ans...
Image from http://www.highlandhosp.com/2014/08/5-tips-to-quit-overthinking/
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
• 
Mental health 
• 
Perception ...
What are other things that you can do to improve the patient-provider interaction?
Other helpful things that you can do to improve a patient-provider interaction 
• 
Stay in a mental feeling process instea...
• 
Motivation – when one uses a lot of energy to get someone to change their action/behavior 
• 
Examples of using motivat...
Requirements for Inspiring Patients 
• 
Develop rapport between the patient and provider 
• 
Climate of caring 
• 
Safe, n...
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
• 
Mental health 
• 
Perception ...
Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts 
Primary Point 
• 
Fulfillment 
• 
Compassion 
• 
Mental health 
• 
Perception ...
Kelee Meditation (KM) 
• 
Kelee Meditation1 is a technique based on “stillness of the mind” to help you to achieve self-un...
What is the Kelee? 
• 
Kelee is a word to describe an energy field that is within everyone 
• 
Kelee means “vessel” or “re...
Kelee Meditation (KM) 
• 
Practicing the development of stillness within the Kelee allows you to 
• 
Shift from conception...
Unique Features of Kelee Meditation (KM) 
• 
Anatomy of the Kelee 
• 
Basic Principles of the Kelee 
• 
Pure stillness of ...
The Future of Health Care - Fulfillment 
Patients 
Administration 
Medical Provider 
What we bring to the world, we bring ...
Acknowledgments 
• 
Kelee Foundation 
• 
Ron W. Rathbun 
• 
AntiViral Research Center 
• 
Owen Clinic 
• 
Our patients 
Fo...
Questions?
Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in...
Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in...
Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in...
Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in...
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Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in Health Care

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Daniel Lee, M.D., of UC San Diego Owen Clinic, presents "Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in Health Care" at AIDS Clinical Rounds

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Improving Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in Health Care

  1. 1. The UC San Diego AntiViral Research Center sponsors weekly presentations by infectious disease clinicians, physicians and researchers. The goal of these presentations is to provide the most current research, clinical practices and trends in HIV, HBV, HCV, TB and other infectious diseases of global significance. The slides from the AIDS Clinical Rounds presentation that you are about to view are intended for the educational purposes of our audience. They may not be used for other purposes without the presenter’s express permission. AIDS CLINICAL ROUNDS
  2. 2. Improving the Patient-Provider Interaction through the Achievement of Provider Wellness: The Forgotten and Ignored Variable in Health Care Daniel Lee, M.D. Clinical Professor of Medicine UCSD Medical Center -- Owen Clinic December 5th, 2014
  3. 3. Health Care Hierarchy Patients Administration Medical Provider Dictate health care Provide health care
  4. 4. Reality of Health Care Patients Administration Medical Provider
  5. 5. Satisfaction in Health Care Patients Administration Medical Provider
  6. 6. What about medical provider satisfaction?
  7. 7. Is being satisfied enough? What is satisfaction? How is satisfaction defined?
  8. 8. Concept #1 – Satisfaction vs. Fulfillment • Satisfaction occurs when we accomplish or complete a task or goal(s) for either ourselves or for someone else • Associated with what we do • Short-lived, fleeting, temporary • Fulfillment is a deeper feeling of contentment that comes from within us, which occurs at an individual level/experience • Associated with how we feel • Longer lasting state of mind 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, January 2010.
  9. 9. If we feel fulfilled in what we do in our lives, we can extend that feeling to everything and everyone we touch in our lives
  10. 10. How do you become more fulfilled in your life? Is fulfillment even possible? Are you fulfilled in your life?
  11. 11. Who came first? The Chicken or the Egg? Image from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/18366310953404890/
  12. 12. Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception “Primary Point” of Perception Who is doing the perception “Secondary Point” of Perception The object of perception You 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, December 2008.
  13. 13. Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception HIV “Primary Point” of Perception Who is doing the perception “Secondary Point” of Perception The object of perception You 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, December 2008. Consciousness Sentience
  14. 14. Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception Five physical senses “Primary Point” of Perception Who is doing the perception “Secondary Point” of Perception The object of perception You 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, December 2008. Consciousness Sentience No Consciousness No Sentience
  15. 15. Concept #2 – Primary Point vs. Secondary Point of Perception Five physical senses “Primary Point” of Perception Who is doing the perception “Secondary Point” of Perception The object of perception You 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, December 2008. Consciousness Sentience No Consciousness No Sentience Local anesthesia General anesthesia
  16. 16. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment Secondary Point • Satisfaction Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  17. 17. Why are medical providers dissatisfied and burning out?
  18. 18. What causes provider burnout? YOU Work Environment Insurance Companies Technology/ EMRs Patients Staff/ Co-workers Administration
  19. 19. External Stressors YOU Work Environment Insurance Companies Technology/ EMRs Patients Staff/ Co-workers Administration
  20. 20. YOU Internal Stressors = Brain Chatter, negative thoughts, unresolved thoughts, preconceptions, biases, expectations, our “issues”
  21. 21. Image from http://ragamuffinstudies.blogspot.com/2007/11/physical-activity-necessary-component.html Have you ever had these thoughts (brain chatter) during a typical work day? Oh no! I have to work with that needy patient again today! Hope I made the right decision with that last patient Argh! That doctor is an asshole! I just know he wants more pain meds!! I hate this computerized electronic medical record system Great! More and more prior authorizations!
  22. 22. External and Internal Stressors YOU Work Environment Insurance Companies Technology Patients Staff/ Co-workers Administration
  23. 23. Do these external and internal stressors affect your ability to provide quality care for your patients? Absolutely yes!
  24. 24. What we bring to others (including patients) comes from within us. If you are not well within, how can you help others?
  25. 25. Why does burnout occur? Burnout occurs when one is not able to be unaffected by persistent, repetitive negative stimuli (ie. stress) Working with sick patients is a difficult task Health care providers (un)knowingly put themselves in a position to have to deal with this type of difficult interaction
  26. 26. What can you do to prevent burnout? You can escape from external stressors, but can you run away from your negative internal thoughts? The first step is learning to understand our own thoughts/feelings and troubleshooting how/why we are affected by internal and external stimuli/triggers Thinking positive and other coping techniques may be helpful temporarily, but truly removing the underlying triggers is the long-term solution
  27. 27. Concept #3 – Empathy vs. Compassion • Empathy occurs with the unhealthy acceptance (conscious or unconscious) of someone else’s pain • You have an attachment to someone else’s pain • Caring but at your own expense/detriment • Compassion is the understanding of one’s pain, but not the acceptance of pain • You have a healthy detachment to someone else’s pain • Caring but not affected 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, October 2011.
  28. 28. Healthy Unhealthy Scale of Health: Empathy vs. Compassion 10 987654321 YOU PATIENT EMPATHY When you empathize, you compromise how you feel and your level drops down to the level of your patient COMPASSION When you are compassionate, you do not compromise how you feel and you allow your patient to come up to your level
  29. 29. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  30. 30. How do you learn to become less affected in your patient care interactions through compassion?
  31. 31. Let’s start by examining the current challenges in the patient-provider interaction
  32. 32. Before the interaction
  33. 33. What do your patients want from a medical provider interaction? • Patients want a medical provider • To be present and not distracted • To listen • To be caring • To be open-minded • To not be judgmental • To take care of their medical needs • Patients want • To have control • To be involved in decision-making
  34. 34. What do medical providers want from a patient care interaction? • Medical providers want a patient • To listen • To follow the medical plan as presented to them • Medical providers want • To have control • To be efficient • To take care of patient’s medical needs • To not be manipulated (ie. pain meds) • To have a pleasant interaction
  35. 35. Preconceived thoughts and brain chatter can affect the patient care interaction Image from http://www.cmgwealth.com/ri/trade-signals-what-i-was-thinking/ Patient Provider
  36. 36. Is a patient or a medical provider truly “present” and “open-minded” if there are too many things on your mind at the same time?
  37. 37. How can communication occur between two people if there is distraction by the presence of brain chatter and preconceived ideas/thoughts and expectations?
  38. 38. Is this why patients only retain 10-20% of the information that they hear from a medical visit? Is this also why patients feel that providers are not present with them?
  39. 39. Since we cannot control anyone else other than ourselves, we can only look at our own thoughts and preconceived ideas
  40. 40. Preconceptions of Patients & Providers Patient • Expectations • Fears • How the interaction will go based on prior visits • What the provider will say • New lab results • New diagnoses, problems • New medications and potential side effects • Will I have enough time to talk about my problems? • How they will be perceived Provider • Expectations • Fears • How the interaction will go based on prior visits • What the patient will say • New complaints • New questions • Requests for unnecessary meds • How much time the patient will take • How they will be perceived
  41. 41. During the interaction
  42. 42. Answer #3 – When you meet with a patient, what is the most important thing to pay attention to in order to determine what is going on with your patient? 1. Physical appearance – what they wear, how they are dressed 2. Your perception – your perception of their mental state/how they feel 3. History & Physical – what they tell you/what you find on exam 4. Lab results – what the lab results show 5. Other
  43. 43. Why is your perception of a patient’s mental state critical in a patient care interaction? Mental health affects physical health
  44. 44. Concept #4 – Mental Health vs. Physical Health • Mental health • Defined as a mental state of well-being • Goal is the absence of stress, anxiety, and/or depression • Associated with quality of life • Precedes physical health • If someone has poor mental health, it is often that their physical health symptoms (ie. pain) are exacerbated and/or worsened • Physical health • Defined as a physical state of well-being • Goal is the absence of physical injury or illness • Often determined by physical exam and/or laboratory testing • Good physical health (ie. good CD4/undetectable VL), does not necessarily guarantee good mental health
  45. 45. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion • Mental health Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy • Physical health Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  46. 46. Redefining Perception • “Perception” may be defined as: • “the way you think about someone or something”1 • Example: “You see it your way, but my perception of it is different than your perception (or perspective).” • “Perception” may be redefined as: • “the way you mentally feel about someone or something”2 • Clear perception or understanding comes from mental feeling (associated with the mind) and occurs when there is the absence of preconception of thoughts or ideas 1. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/perception. 2. RW Rathbun, personal communication, 2006.
  47. 47. We think about what we don’t understand, but we feel what we know
  48. 48. Concept #5 – Conception vs. Perception • Conception occurs when you do not understand something and you think (create or conceive) of an answer to the problem • Comparison between what you have seen in the past and what you are examining in the present • With conception, you are essentially changing what you are seeing to fit it into a prior algorithm or understanding • Preconceived thoughts or ideas limit your ability to see clearly and “think outside of the box” • Perception occurs when your mind is open and you do not use preconceived thoughts or ideas to understand something • Can allow you to understand things that you haven’t seen or experienced before because you are not trying to conceive the answer • Open thought or perception allows you to see what something is without changing what you see 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, April 2007.
  49. 49. Image from http://www.miscopono.com/2012/12/we-cannot-solve-our-problems-with-same.html
  50. 50. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion • Mental health • Perception Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy • Physical health • Conception Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  51. 51. So why is it important to use your individual perception in patient care? • When you use your perception, • You learn to assess how a patient is feeling • More accurate assessment of their quality of life • You are not limited to only being attentive to the physical or verbal cues, which can be misleading • Patients can feign physical illness • Patients can lie about what is going on with them • Patients may sometimes not really be aware of what is going on with them, nor may they be able to clearly verbalize what is wrong • It will be very difficult for patients to deceive a medical provider who has learned and developed the awareness in how to read emotion • Improve your efficiency at work
  52. 52. What can you do to improve the patient-provider interaction?
  53. 53. You enter a dark room and in the center is a lit candle. Which of the following do you think is correct? Raise your hand. You must choose 1 answer. A. The light illuminates the room B. You see the light Exercise #1 Image from http://randalrauser.com/2012/12/does-a-candle-really-illumine-the-darkness/
  54. 54. You enter a dark room and in the center is a lit candle. Which of the following do you feel is correct? Raise your hand. You must choose 1 answer. A. The light illuminates the room B. You see the light Exercise #2 Image from http://randalrauser.com/2012/12/does-a-candle-really-illumine-the-darkness/
  55. 55. When you think, it usually is about something (outside of us) Image from http://www.cmgwealth.com/ri/trade-signals-what-i-was-thinking/ Past Problems People Future
  56. 56. When we mentally feel, we gauge how we feel internally (within us). Image from http://fontmeme.com/emoticons/
  57. 57. Concept #6 – Thinking vs. Feeling • Asking patients about what they think vs. how they feel can yield very different answers • Asking patients about what they think keeps them in an intellectual process associated with their preconceived thoughts (what others have told them and what they have learned or conceived to be true) • Asking patients about how they feel can move people into a mental feeling process, which is associated with how they feel right now and keeps them more in the present moment 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, June 2007.
  58. 58. Image from http://www.highlandhosp.com/2014/08/5-tips-to-quit-overthinking/
  59. 59. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion • Mental health • Perception • Feeling (mental) Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy • Physical health • Conception • Thinking Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  60. 60. What are other things that you can do to improve the patient-provider interaction?
  61. 61. Other helpful things that you can do to improve a patient-provider interaction • Stay in a mental feeling process instead of a thinking process • This will help you remain calm and present with a patient • Use your perception • To determine the patient’s level of understanding • To identify and anticipate potential patient fears • Teach and educate your patients • Explain diagnoses, labs and imaging results • Share why these tests are done and what are future steps • Reducing fears through education saves time later on • Learn how to inspire patients rather than just motivate them
  62. 62. • Motivation – when one uses a lot of energy to get someone to change their action/behavior • Examples of using motivation include achieving sobriety, stopping smoking, increasing exercise, improving diet • The need to control or the need for an intended outcome (ie. goal) often underlies motivation • Short-lived effect – temporary change • Inspiration – the desire to change (to be better) comes from within an individual rather than an outside source • As medical providers, we can learn how to inspire our patients by sharing a genuine feeling of caring with patients that comes from within us • The feeling of care underlies inspiration, rather than an intent or goal • Longer-lasting effect – permanent change Concept #7 – Motivation vs. Inspiration 1. RW Rathbun, personal communication, March 2009.
  63. 63. Requirements for Inspiring Patients • Develop rapport between the patient and provider • Climate of caring • Safe, non-threatening environment • Non-judgmental interaction • Patients have to be ready to change • Providers have to be patient
  64. 64. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion • Mental health • Perception • Feeling (mental) • Inspiration Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy • Physical health • Conception • Thinking • Motivation Primary Point Who is doing the perception Secondary Point The object of perception You
  65. 65. Primary Point vs. Secondary Point Concepts Primary Point • Fulfillment • Compassion • Mental health • Perception • Feeling (mental) • Inspiration Secondary Point • Satisfaction • Empathy • Physical health • Conception • Thinking • Motivation How do you move from seeing life from secondary point to primary point?
  66. 66. Kelee Meditation (KM) • Kelee Meditation1 is a technique based on “stillness of the mind” to help you to achieve self-understanding and troubleshoot your own thoughts and feelings 1. Rathbun, RW. (2008). The Kelee Meditation Practice: The Basic Principles of the Kelee. Oceanside, CA: Quiescence Publishing. • Stillness is defined as absence of distraction from the 5 physical senses and thoughts (brain function) • A mind is still when you are mentally feeling the primary point of perception in the greater Kelee (mind function) without an awareness of a second point
  67. 67. What is the Kelee? • Kelee is a word to describe an energy field that is within everyone • Kelee means “vessel” or “receptacle” in Greek and Hebrew • The Kelee represents the receptacle of one’s life experience (our thoughts and feelings) • Kelee meditation is unique because of the anatomy of the Kelee, which can be felt and experienced with practice Image reproduced with permission from Ron W. Rathbun and is taken from http:/www.thekelee.org website Rathbun, RW. (2008). The Kelee Meditation Practice: The Basic Principles of the Kelee. Oceanside, CA: Quiescence Publishing.
  68. 68. Kelee Meditation (KM) • Practicing the development of stillness within the Kelee allows you to • Shift from conception (thinking) at the secondary point to perception (mental feeling) at the primary point • Reduce the brain chatter associated with preconceived thoughts, ideas, expectations in order to be less distracted and more present • Reduce burnout through experiencing detachment from external and internal stressors • Improve emotional and physical health • Learn how to be more compassionate rather than empathetic 1. Rathbun, RW. (2008). The Kelee Meditation Practice: The Basic Principles of the Kelee. Oceanside, CA: Quiescence Publishing.
  69. 69. Unique Features of Kelee Meditation (KM) • Anatomy of the Kelee • Basic Principles of the Kelee • Pure stillness of mind – absence of thoughts/distractions from the 5 physical senses • A true “non-intervention” – KM does not introduce thoughts or chemicals into the physical body • Does not require a teacher for anyone to learn KM • Brief 5-10 minute meditation twice daily • KM is not a coping technique – effective at removing the underlying trigger through self-understanding
  70. 70. The Future of Health Care - Fulfillment Patients Administration Medical Provider What we bring to the world, we bring from within
  71. 71. Acknowledgments • Kelee Foundation • Ron W. Rathbun • AntiViral Research Center • Owen Clinic • Our patients For more information about Kelee Meditation, go to www.thekelee.org For more information about Kelee Meditation class for providers, email me at dalee@ucsd.edu
  72. 72. Questions?

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