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A Celebration of Women's History Month

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To celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8, 2019, we asked our online community of college instructors to share stories of women who made a difference in their educations. Each response was acknowledged by Wiley with a donation to one of four charities: The Campaign for Female Education, Girls Who Code, The Malala Fund, and The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts.

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A Celebration of Women's History Month

  1. 1. Celebrating Women’s History Month 2019
  2. 2. To celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8, 2019, we asked our online community of college instructors to share stories of women who made a difference in their educations. Each response was acknowledged by Wiley with a donation to one of four charities: The Campaign for Female Education, Girls Who Code, The Malala Fund, and The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. We received 193 responses in all — stories of life-changing elementary school teachers, female family members, college professors, professional coaches and mentors, friends and colleagues. These tales were too inspiring to keep to ourselves, so we wanted to share a few with you.
  3. 3. The woman who had the most significant impact on my education was my mentor and biggest supporter, my mother. Without her, I would not have known what hard work is. She was a non-traditional student who taught full time and commuted to school ninety minutes away for years to finish her degree while taking care of my siblings and me. She modeled love for others, kindness, hard work and faith through difficult circumstances. Amos Kasperek Bob Jones University
  4. 4. For me, it would have to be one of several women in my family. My mother and both grandmothers were educators and started to instill the value of education in me at an early age. Theopholieus Worrell Delgado Community College
  5. 5. My high school chemistry teacher encouraged her best Chemistry 1 students to take a second year of chemistry. In some sense she allowed us to run free with that course, but really, she was encouraging us to pursue the topics that really interested us. She encouraged me to develop a passion for science. Christi Luks Missouri University of Science & Technology
  6. 6. Wendy Beres, my mother, an intervention specialist taught me the importance of determination in education. She worked with me every night in junior year on math skills I could not understand. She would not accept that I was “not a math person.” She was right and once it clicked; I had the skills to teach myself anything. I went on to take four semesters of calculus in college. I don’t think I would have been able to get a Ph.D. if it had not been for the skills she taught me. Nathaniel Beres Heidelberg University
  7. 7. My Algebra 1 teacher in 8th grade, Mrs. Gemma Giannantonio, was the first teacher to teach me mathematics using a clear, logical approach. Prior to her class, I was good at math, but never really enjoyed it. Her instruction set me on the path to many more great discoveries on the beauty of mathematics. Thank you, Mrs. Giannantonio! Kati Dobeck Lorain County Community College
  8. 8. My college professor Dr. Diana Lopez is one of the many Latina women who made a difference in my life. Dr. Lopez is a role model I hold dear to my heart because she is a Latina who beat the odds of racial barriers in Higher Education. Professor Lopez believed in me, a first- generation college Latina; she showed me that Latinas could break through the barriers and become scholars. Dr. Lopez encouraged young Latinas to persist in college. She inspired me to break racial and educational barriers. Thanks to Dr. Diana Lopez, I am a powerful, confident, educated, and empowered Mujer (woman) who is dedicated to helping Latinas succeed in Higher Education!* Martha Petersen Southern New Hampshire University * Any reference in this website to any person, or organization, or activities, products, or services related to such person or organization, or any linkages from this web site to the web site of another party, do not constitute or imply the endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of Wiley’s products and/or services.
  9. 9. My mentor Dr. Lorraine Wiley was the kindest most supportive person that influenced me. She was very involved in getting minority students, and other people of color into medical and dental school. She had a large number of success stories to her credit. I started out as her student and ended up as her colleague. I was honored to be called be her friend. Bryon Spicci Nunez Community College
  10. 10. My mom, Dr. Pamela Cignetti had a big influence. After my parents’ divorce, she raised 4 kids, earned her doctorate, and was an amazing mother and great role model. Doug Petrick Upper St. Clair High School

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