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The next stages of your journey to agile performance management

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The next stages of your journey to agile performance management

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In a transition from traditional performance management to agile performance management, there are people capabilities that need to be strengthened. This is because everybody leads in an agile environment, and usually leadership development training has not been available wholesale throughout the organisation. You don't need the capabilities in order to begin, but you do need the capabilities in order to master an agile culture and foster an agile performance management mindset among your people.

In a transition from traditional performance management to agile performance management, there are people capabilities that need to be strengthened. This is because everybody leads in an agile environment, and usually leadership development training has not been available wholesale throughout the organisation. You don't need the capabilities in order to begin, but you do need the capabilities in order to master an agile culture and foster an agile performance management mindset among your people.

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The next stages of your journey to agile performance management

  1. 1. A travel guide to peak performance The next 4 stages to reinvent Performance Management
  2. 2. What is Agile Performance Management? 2 As of now, we suggest adjustment towards: • Agreeing commitments Setting goals • Helping managers everyone coach others • Providing more continuous micro feedback, support, and growth or change (shifting the focus from annual evaluation and rankings to continuous feedback feed forward and development just in time learning) • Being more collaborative, social, and faster-moving • Providing people analytics for decision support …. and this will continue to evolve
  3. 3. 3 Last time we commenced our journey Plan your route Which direction will you take, how far do you want to go, and how to avoid the sinkholes Prepare for your journey Pump up the tyres, check the warning lights and fill up the fuel tank The hill climb How to overcome resistance and build momentum Getting to know your travel companions The essential relationship skills for an enjoyable trip Recap: The 4 essential first stages
  4. 4. 4 Today we’re entering tougher terrain Traffic Jams and Scenic Lookouts The 3 causes of upset and how to work around them Picking up hitchhikers How do you get support for the change, and which types of supporter can help with what Alternate Route Changing your attitude to embrace conflict Stop! Are you ready to remove ratings If you are planning to remove performance ratings, what are the pre-requisites? The next 4 stages to create an agile culture
  5. 5. Traffic Jams and Scenic Lookouts 5
  6. 6. To put it simply, 3 things cause upset# 6 Simplification can be useful in agile approaches 1. Withheld Communication 2. Unfulfilled Expectations 3. Thwarted Intentions What should we do when upset rears it’s head? # Originally from Werner Erhard/Landmark Education
  7. 7. Withheld Communication 7 Growth Mindset requires risk taking & courage Cause of the Jam Things to do at the Scenic Lookout Withheld Communication Communication that is not clear occurs when our message is not heard the way we want it to be. Not communicating clearly leads to conflict through misunderstanding Communication that is not direct occurs when we fear there will be consequences for speaking the truth. Tacit repression leads to conflict through resentment. Communication that is not complete occurs when we leave it to the listener to fill in the blanks. This causes conflict through confusion and fear of failure. In Understanding your travelling companions we looked at differences in communication styles. Acknowledging varying communication styles and perspectives explains why clear communication can be challenging. MindTools have a great checklist covering the 7 C's of clear communication here (https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCS_85.htM) Overcoming fear is a harder nut to crack. In her book "The Psychology of Fear in Organizations" Sheila M. Keegan advises •Build trust. That means being straightforward, admitting mistakes, keeping promises, showing vulnerability and letting go of grievances. •Improve your listening skills. Focus on what your employees are saying to you. Hear and interpret their verbal and nonverbal communication. Maintain a neutral and open attitude. Most importantly, don’t judge. •Encourage risk-taking and reward courage. Urge employees to experiment, learn and improvise. Help them rediscover their sense of joy and intrinsic reward of working. •Treat employees with respect. Acknowledge their worth and help them succeed. Another great book in support of speaking up is "The Courageous Follower" by Ira Chaleff
  8. 8. Unfulfilled Expectation 8 Improper delegation is a disaster waiting to happen Cause of the Jam Things to do at the Scenic Lookout Unfulfilled Expectations We expect something to happen as a result of others, and it does not. This causes conflict through attachment of blame Our work life is filled with many expectations; how we behave, what we produce, what we wear, when and how we are appreciated, and the knowledge, skills and resources we bring to work for example. The cardinal rule is an implicit expectation is an unrealistic one rather than an unfulfilled one, so make sure expectations are explicit (and consistently applied) as your starting point. Assuming you've done that, you've narrowed the expectation gap to unfulfilled realistic expectations. Follow an expectation management lifecycle to handle these. Assignment - Progression - Delivery - Closure Assignment If expectations are being set for you make sure you know the context by asking questions. What's expected, how might it be achieved, when is the outcome needed, what is it's priority against other things, and how will success be measured. If you're setting expectations and get no questions, ask for your brief to be echoed back to you and listen carefully that it's fully understood. Progression Get incremental buy-in, it will always work better than a fait accompli. Raise challenges or failure early, there's nothing worse than facing failure without any options to avoid it. If you're holding expectations, check-in often (not to be confused with micromanagement) to guide the outcome you're seeking. Delivery Leave contingency for corrections (e.g. time & budget). Collaborate to finalise work whenever possible to close any expectation gaps jointly. Closure Once an expectation has been met it's important to reach closure. That's your time to appreciate the work done, reflect on the experience and refine expectations for the future. The main thing throughout this lifecycle is to leave no doubt that expectations are being met and immediately address where they are not.
  9. 9. Thwarted Intentions 9 Do you have people ‘winning at all costs’? Cause of the Jam Things to do at the Scenic Lookout Thwarted Intentions We wish to take action but are unsuccessful due to Lack of skill Lack of will Lack of time Lack of resources This leads to conflict because of guilt and remorse Being intentional is encouraged. Intentions are how we commit to learning, to goals and to doing our best. Problems arise though when people become attached to their intentions rather than committed to them. Attachment limits objectivity, flexibility and creativity and instead fuels us to "win at all costs". It's visible as anxiety, fatigue and competition. Build a culture that celebrates the insight from failure as a way to reflect, learn, reframe intentions and recommit and you'll see increases in innovation and contribution. Supplement that with a process that rewards the way goals are met, and not just that goals are met and you'll start to weed out those people winning at all costs and burning everyone around them. The principle of winning the right way is one of my personal passions. I highly recommend you read "Winning Well: A Manager's Guide to Getting Results---Without Losing Your Soul" by Karin Hurt and David Dye .
  10. 10. Picking up Hitchhikers 10
  11. 11. What is your stand? 11 How do people decide if they want to join in? What’s the one simple thing that people can do to be seen to be part of your ‘movement’? Are you standing up for meaningful work? Are you standing against anxiety in the workplace? Standing for lifelong learning and supportiveness, for recognition and appreciation, for autonomy, empowerment, transparency or against ineffective bureaucracy, artificial hierarchy, or dog-eat-dog extrinsic motivation schemes?
  12. 12. Be easy to follow 12 Favouring followers drives momentum There will be people craving an agile performance management culture Supporting them is a better use of energy that coercing others The tipping point is where it becomes less risky to join than not to join the change
  13. 13. Using 3 types of influencers 13 Network Analytics help to visualize the people dynamic Connectors - people in the network who bond others together and span social, cultural and economic circles Mavens - people who connect us to new information and start word-of- mouth epidemics Salesmen - charismatic people with powerful negotiation skills needed to persuade others Taken from “The Tipping Point” Malcolm Gladwell
  14. 14. Take a firm line on detractors 14 Change the people or change the people 1. Listen to their concerns and make reasonable adjustments if needed 2.Encourage a growth mindset to fight their self- sabotage 3. Isolate the detractor from situations where they can sour others (particularly if they are influential) 4. Remove the detractor from the environment completely
  15. 15. Alternate Route 15
  16. 16. Conflict – Good or Bad? 16 There is potentially great value from conflict "There is giant untapped potential in disagreement, especially if the disagreement is between two or more thoughtful people". Ray Dalio CEO Bridgewater Associates
  17. 17. It depends! 17 or possibly high cost On average US employees spend 3 hours a week dealing with conflict 27% of employees report conflict led to personal insults and attacks 22% of employees report conflict led to illness and absence from work 10% report project failure being a direct result of conflict Psychologically, conflict is a disagreement that represents a perceived threat to position, interests or needs. In Australia exit interviews reveal that chronic unresolved conflict is a decisive factor in at least 50% of all employee departures
  18. 18. The push & pull 18 Surfacing & resolving is critical • Leaders speaking last during ideation or problem solving, avoiding prejudicing the dialogue or outcome • Celebrating those who openly question decisions or challenge the status quo • Appointing a devil's advocate in meetings to search for problems, shortcomings and oversights with group decisions or plans • Getting tough on team members who later show they had withheld perspective that could have been valuable if tabled 1. Focus on the facts and behaviours in question 2. State the impact on you, your team or the company 3. Consider why a rational and ethical person would indulge the facts or behaviours that are troubling you 4. Know what is non-negotiable to you and why Push conflict handling skills Pull conflict out into the open
  19. 19. 5 levels of conflict 19 Though sometimes not necessary or possible Differences Misunderstandings Disagreements Discord Polarization
  20. 20. Stop! 20
  21. 21. Rating Reliance 21 Why the dilemma? A proxy for recognition To simplify communication Bonus eligibility Salary Level Promotion/Succession Performance Improvement Plans Talent Management Learning & Development HiPo Acceleration etc….
  22. 22. 3 inherent flaws 22 Alternatives don’t carry this baggage BIASED THREATENING HISTORICAL
  23. 23. HR Data is everywhere 23 Use current data & people analytics for decisions
  24. 24. Remove the rubric 24 Ask reviewers what they undisputedly know Given what I know of this person’s performance, and if it were my money, I would award this person the highest possible compensation increase and bonus. Given what I know of this person’s performance, I would always want him or her on my team. This person is at risk for low performance. This person is ready for promotion today.
  25. 25. Multiply your data points 25 The more in-year reviews there are more informed periodic decisions become
  26. 26. Capture the stories, calculate the score 26 Qualitative data can become quantitative with algorithms Rebekah was extremely knowledgeable, very helpful, great personality, explained everything & always with a smile … her assistance & patience prompts me to acknowledge her & refer her to my friends who need the same assistance that I did. Thank you. Rebekah works in the Electronics Department of Target in Selinsgrove, PA, United States “Please give us your feedback” Based on your most recent experience, on a scale of 0 to 10 where 0 is not at all likely and 10 is extremely likely, how likely would you be to recommend us to your friends or colleagues? 1 2 43 5 6 7 8 9 10
  27. 27. Consider retaining 1 last rating 27 If beliefs don’t align, the rest doesn’t matter I believe what you believe
  28. 28. 28 Look out for the next 4 stages of the journey I-spy Bias
  29. 29. Learn more …. 29 www.paycompliment.com/xecr1r www.paycompliment.com/blog

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