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Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism.docx
Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism.docx
Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism.docx
Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism.docx
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Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism.docx

  1. https://www.florugby.com/articles/10779513-greed-kills-world-cup-campaigns Rugby World Cup efforts are killed by capitalism With England's World Cup victory in 2003, the All Blacks and Springboks have won the last four competitions, marking 20 years of Southern Hemisphere dominance at the Rugby World Cup. There is one indisputable variation in the way the two hemispheres view the game's culminating event, despite the fact that they are on separate annual calendars. Before a single ball is kicked in pool play, one part of the globe games rugby significantly less, while the other squad plays rugby much more. The yearly Six Nations tournament, in which each side played five tests, has now come to an end. The battle has been extremely intense because it features the elite two nations in the globe, France and Ireland. The participants will play out their individual Top 14, Premiership, and URC campaigns upon returning to team land and finish European Cup tournaments by late May. Yet, the Northern Hemisphere countries significantly hurt their chances of making the Rugby World Cup throughout the summertime. The unions schedule full- fledged test series in August to replenish their accounts in order to make up for the lost cash during the customary November worldwide season, when they would typically sweep it in from sold-out stadiums. In the summer of 2019, Italy and Ireland played England 2 times. Wales contested four matches versus two of the best in Europe, playing both England and Ireland two times. Although these were billed as "warm-up" games, they were played with teams that were almost as strong as test series. In addition to the five test series they had already played this year, that indicated they would participate four more.
  2. Wales, the Grand Slam champion in 2019, was unable to reach its full potential at the conclusion of that year's Rugby World Cup. By the time they faced South Africa in the semifinal, the number of injuries was staggering. Gareth Anscombe ruptured his ACL versus England during one of the summer warm-up games, and he was unable to board the flight to Japan. No. 8 Taulupe Faletau also lost the race due to an injury sustained in a pre-event training run. Josh Navidi suffered a hamstring strain and was forced to miss the quarterfinal victory over France. Before the semifinal, Liam Williams was ruled out while George North hurt his leg just perior to the halftime. Jonathan Davies and Hadleigh Parkes, two midfielders, were questionable to even participate because of injuries. Of course, ailments are to be anticipated, but in this case, several important members of the team were leaving like flies as they prepared for their 15th test series of the year. They would have been cannon fodder if they had advanced to the Rugby World Cup final for a 16th test match, as evidenced by the All Blacks' thrashing of them in the bronze medal game. Wales put up a fantastic fight and made a heroic attempt, but they were unquestionably a shell of the team who won the Six Nations that February. Given the fact that they still challenged South Africa to the limit in the 19-16 semifinal defeat despite having a walking wounded side, they may have claimed the William Webb Ellis trophy with better player handling. When they most required them, they lacked the performing facilities they would have required to maximize their abilities. In pool play, Scotland and Ireland also struggled, losing shockingly to Japan. While neither team was performing very well, Japan got right to work after timing their effort just so. Japan defied common wisdom and withdrew all of its performers from Super Rugby for the whole season in order to prepare for the Rugby World Cup, depriving the Sunwolves of any Japanese internationals.
  3. Instead, a shadow Rugby World Cup team competed against a few Super Rugby 'B' teams and even amateur club rugby players. After that, Japan only contested four test matches in total, three in the Pacific Nations Cup versus Tonga, Fiji, and the United States, and one warm-up match over the Springboks. With just that time spent preparing, Ireland was shocked 19–12 in group play. Several of the Irish participants were from the Leinster team, who had already competed in the Pro14 final and the European Cup final. Ireland was performing its 11th test match of the year. Relative to their Irish rivals, Japan's players have played a pitiful quantity of rugby. The outcome implies that the Brave Blossoms were better off playing far less during a Rugby World Cup year rather than more. Even though European players get a two-month summer holidays in June and July, their real playing burden and commitments throughout the previous year leading up to a Rugby World Cup nevertheless far outnumber those in the south. There is a strong case to be made that the Northern Hemisphere countries were murdered by greed in 2019, as they exhausted their performers before they were required to peak. Even England, which kept its roster relatively intact without dropping any important players, was unable to match South Africa's energy in the decisive match after going all-out to shock the All Blacks. Nevertheless, when it comes to preparation for the competition, the Southern Hemisphere nations adopt the exact opposite strategy. The All Blacks throughout Super Rugby Pacific will be required to miss matches, as has been the situation for some years, thus resting mechanisms have been put in existence. The Rugby Tournament, which the countries of the Southern Hemisphere will participate this July, will be scaled back with less travel and some matches. Instead of the regular six in-competition tests, they will only take three.
  4. The Bledisloe Cup will be decided by one more test between the All Blacks and Wallabies, while four more tests will be played between South Africa and Argentina. August features one additional warm-up test for New Zealand, Argentina, and Australia while South Africa hosts two. South Africa will have 6 test matches under its belt whereas the Southern Hemisphere countries only have 5. The two top squads in the globe, Ireland and France, have the best possibilities to end the stalemate in the Northern Hemisphere. Participants like Johnny Sexton, Josh van der Flier, Antoine Dupont, and Romain Ntamack participating in summer warm-up games defies every sense of logic. It's debatable whether Sexton will even play for Leinster this season. He is so essential to Ireland's candidacy that it must be done whatever it takes to keep him. This is too good a chance to waste. Irish Rugby needs him to play in a Rugby World Cup final in November, not another Champions Cup final in May. Japan served as a model. They are not required to play.
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