Teens and Libraries: A Media Literacy Perspective

on

  • 1,878 reproducciones

Renee Hobbs invites teen librarians to reflect on how their attitudes about print, visual, sound and digital media shape their work. She reviews the developmental characteristics of adolescents that ...

Renee Hobbs invites teen librarians to reflect on how their attitudes about print, visual, sound and digital media shape their work. She reviews the developmental characteristics of adolescents that most affect teen media use behaviors. She considers the pros and cons of empowerment and protection in helping teens thrive in a media-saturated society.

Estadísticas

reproducciones

reproducciones totales
1,878
reproducciones en SlideShare
1,179
reproducciones incrustadas
699

Actions

Me gusta
1
Descargas
4
Comentarios
0

5 insertados 699

http://info-competencies-youth.com 596
http://mediaeducationlab.com 99
http://www.twylah.com 2
https://twitter.com 1
http://infocompetenciesyouth.wordpress.com 1

Accesibilidad

Categorias

Detalles de carga

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Derechos de uso

© Todos los derechos reservados

Report content

Marcada como inapropiada Marcar como inapropiada
Marcar como inapropiada

Seleccione la razón para marcar esta presentación como inapropiada.

Cancelar
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Tu mensaje aparecerá aquí
    Processing...
Publicar comentario
Edite su comentario
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  • EU Survey of risks N = 25,000 kids from 13 countriesThe survey asked about a range of risks, asdetailed in what follows. Looking across allthese risks, 41% of European 9-16 year oldshave encountered one or more of theserisks. Risks increase with age: 14% of 9-10 yearolds have encountered one or more of the risksasked about, rising to 33% of 11-12 year olds,49% of 13-14 year olds and 63% of 15-16 yearolds.
  • EU Survey of risks N = 25,000 kids from 13 countriesThe survey asked about a range of risks, asdetailed in what follows. Looking across allthese risks, 41% of European 9-16 year oldshave encountered one or more of theserisks. Risks increase with age: 14% of 9-10 yearolds have encountered one or more of the risksasked about, rising to 33% of 11-12 year olds,49% of 13-14 year olds and 63% of 15-16 yearolds.
  • Please share the White Paper with colleagues and all who see that the time is now – together, we can build a community education movement for digital and media literacy.

Teens and Libraries: A Media Literacy Perspective Teens and Libraries: A Media Literacy Perspective Presentation Transcript

  • Teens & Libraries:A Media Literacy Perspective Renee Hobbs YALSA Teens and Libraries Summit January 24, 2013
  • RACHEL HOBBS ROGER HOBBSPlanned Parenthood Fundraiser Author of Ghostman ALA Gala Author Tea Mon, Jan 28
  • www.mediaeducationlab.com
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • What do we need to know and be able to do when it comes tosupporting and extending teens’ use of print, visual, sound anddigital texts, tools and technologies?
  • A Lifelong Process
  • A Lifelong Process
  • A Lifelong Process
  • NEW TEXTSNEW TOOLS NEW RELATIONSHIPS
  • PRINTMEDIA
  • SOUNDMEDIA
  • VISUALMEDIA
  • DIGITALMEDIA
  • LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL What is your love/hate relationship with media, technology and popular culture?
  • LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL How do your attitudes about media, technology and popular culture shape various aspects of your work?
  • Developmental Characteristics of Adolescence Go After Novelty,Take Risks in Pursuit of Love Experience for its Complexity and Intense Experience Own Sake Situations
  • Searching for the Sensational
  • Escaping to Alternative Worlds
  • Playing with Identity
  • Speaking Out as a Civic Actor
  • Developing Emotional Reasoning
  • Understanding & Using Social PowerFitting InStanding Out
  • Talking to Anyone about Anything ... and keeping secrets from parents and adultsLINK
  • Transgressing Social Norms
  • How do you design library programs and services to meet the needs of young people?
  • Media Literacy Embraces Protection & EmpowermentWhen it comes tochildren and teens…It’s a two-sided coin
  • Empowerment
  • Approaches to EmpowermentFocus on:MediumFriendshipInterestsAdvocacyCraft/DIY
  • Approaches to EmpowermentFocus on:MediumFriendshipInterestsAdvocacyCraft/DIY
  • Approaches to EmpowermentFocus on:MediumFriendshipInterestsAdvocacyCraft/DIY
  • Approaches to EmpowermentFocus on:MediumFriendshipInterestsAdvocacyCraft/DIY
  • Approaches to EmpowermentFocus on:MediumFriendshipInterestsAdvocacyCraft/DIY
  • Characteristics of the Empowerment Learning Process Hanging Out Messing Around Geeking Out
  • Empowerment has ChallengesUnintended Consequences Making without Social & Ethical Norms of Digital Engagement Critical Analysis = Re-Shaped by Peer Mindless Imitation Expectations of Constant Connectedness
  • Protection
  • 50% of classroom teachers believe that children spend too much time in front of screens Wartella, Schomburg, Lauricella, Robb & Flynn, 2010
  • Media Addiction among 11 – 16 Year Olds5% Gone without eating or sleeping because of the Internet11% Felt bothered when I cannot be on the Internet16% Caught myself surfing when I am not really interested13% Spent less time with either family, friends, or doing schoolwork because of the time I spent on the Internet13% Tried unsuccessfully to spent less time on the InternetSOURCE: EU Kids Online, 2012
  • Protection CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT RISKS RISKS RISKSSOURCE: EU Kids Online
  • Media Content Influences Attitudes & BehaviorsNutrition Substance Abuse Stereotypes
  • Media Content Influences Attitudes & Behaviors Online SocialSexuality Aggression Responsibility
  • From Passive to Active Users
  • Media Literacy Instructional Practices1. Reflecting on our Media Choices2. Play and Learning with Media & Technology3. Developing Information Access & Research Skills4. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills5. Composing Messages using Multimedia Tools6. Exploring Media Issues in Society7. Sharing Ideas and Taking Action
  • Characteristics of the Media Literacy Learning Process
  • Core Concepts of Media Literacy
  • People Interpret Messages are Messages Differently RepresentationsMessages Have Economic &Political Power Messages Use Different Messages Influence our Codes and Conventions Attitudes and Behaviors
  • http://whatspoppyn.blogspot.com LINK
  • Protecting Has ChallengesAdults Standing on Teens Parroting the “Right” Fear and Cynicism Soapbox Critical Ideas Discourage Innovation
  • Interpreting Teen Online Behavior Through a Protection – Empowerment Lens STICKAM.com LINK
  • What did you notice?Is this activity harmful or harmless? What questions should be asked?
  • Opportunities for frank and candid discussion about media,technology and popular culture should be an essential componentof teen library programs
  • Discourses of protection andempowerment shape teen media usechoices, attitudes and behaviors
  • Why does it matter?
  • What factors predict a teenager’s intention to be civically engaged?Sample. Middle-class suburbanDetroit high school, 50% white and50% African-American. N = 100Method. End-of-semester online Civicsurvey. Pilot study for PBSMcNeil/Lehrer Student Reporting EngagementLabs(www.studentreportinglabs.com)Approach to Analysis. Factoranalysis and regression.
  • What factors predict a teenager’s intention to be civically engaged? POSITIVE ATTITUDES ABOUT INFORMATION , SEARCH, NEWS AND CURRENT EVENTS Civic UNDERSTANDING OF MEDIA LITERACY CONCEPTS Engagement HANDS-ON EXPOSURE TO MEDIA PRODUCTION EXPERIENCES
  • EDUCATION CREATIVEDigital & Media Literacy Stakeholders in GOVERNMENT LIBRARY TECH BUSINESS ACTIVIST
  • Teens & Libraries: A Media Literacy PerspectiveRenee HobbsHarrington School of Communication and MediaUniversity of Rhode IslandEmail: hobbs@uri.eduTwitter: reneehobbsWeb: http://mediaeducationlab.com