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Effective Oral Communication

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Effective Oral Communication

  1. 1. M. A. Rehman
  2. 2. ▪ Oral communication describes any type of interaction that makes use of spoken words. It implies expressing ideas and conveying information through mouth. ▪ Oral communication is the process of verbally transmitting information and ideas from one individual or group to another. ▪ Oral communication is generally recommended when the communication matter is of temporary kind or where a direct interaction is required.
  3. 3. ORAL COMMUNICATION ▪ The various modes of verbal communication are face-to-face discussions, presentations, intercom, telephonic conversations, radio, skyping or video conferencing, speeches & interviews, etc. ▪ Oral communication could be formal or informal: ▪ Formal Communication ▪ Presentations ▪ Business Meetings ▪ Classroom Lectures ▪ Speeches ▪ Interviews ▪ Informal Communication ▪ Face-to-Face Conversation ▪ Group Discussion ▪ Telephone Conversations
  4. 4. ▪ Strong oral communication skills are important for everyone to master. They are extremely valuable in both personal and professional life. ▪ When speaking clearly, confidently, and with self-control, you are much more likely to command the respect of others and build rapport. ▪ For verbal communication to be effective, it should be clear, relevant, tactful in forming phrases and tone, concise, and informative. ▪ Nonverbal elements such as posture, gestures, and facial expressions are also important factors in developing good verbal communication skills. ▪ Remember,“Your outward appearance mirrors your inner mood.”
  5. 5. ▪ Clarity in expression and pronunciation ▪ Conciseness in information being delivered ▪ Precision and correctness of information ▪ Appropriate Wording ▪ Appropriate medium of communication ▪ Appropriate body language ▪ Avoid overloaded information and hackneyed phrases ▪ Voice Tone ▪ Logical Statements ▪ Identification of communication barriers and rectification of problems
  6. 6. ▪ Thinking Before Uttering: By organizing your thoughts in advance, you can eliminate many of the awkward pauses that occur when speaking. It will also help you relay your information more concisely. ▪ Speaking with Confidence: Speaking in a confident manner will help you build trust and command the respect of your audience. There are several factors which can impact your ability to speak confidently, including your command of the subject matter, your word choice, the tone of your voice, your body language, and your ability to make direct eye contact with your audience. ▪ Clarity and Conciseness: The most effective way to get your point across is to make it in a clear and concise manner. Avoid using complex, convoluted sentences, and try to state your argument in direct language.
  7. 7. (cont.) ▪ Non-Verbal Cues: Your body language significantly impacts the way others interpret what you say. Pay attention to the gestures you make, your facial expressions, and your body language to ensure they align with the message you are trying to get across. ▪ Be A Good Listener: Being a good listener is as important as being a good speaker, and it will improve the quality of your oral interactions. It shows the people you are speaking with that you genuinely care about their ideas, and it helps ensure you understand their needs. This will enable you to build trust and rapport much quicker. ▪ Voice Tone: Speaking in a monotone voice is a surefire way to bore your audience. Instead, use voice inflection to add emphasis to important points, and vary the pitch of your voice to express emotion. This will help keep your audience engaged in your message.
  8. 8. (cont.) ▪ Body Language: Your posture has the greatest impact on your communication. The impression you have on others is split approximately: Body (visuals) 55% Voice (sound) 38% Words (content) 7% Folded arms, crossed legs, hunched shoulders, hands in pockets, looking down – these are just some of the protective measures that make us feel safer, and should be avoided when giving a presentation or speech. Appearing relaxed makes us exert dominance and authority.
  9. 9. ADVANTAGES OF ORAL COMMUNICATION ▪ Saves time ▪ More influential ▪ True essence of meaning are conveyed ▪ Immediate feedback ▪ Immediate clarification ▪ High level of understanding and transparency ▪ Promotes informal communication ▪ More effective with groups ▪ Better for conveying feelings & emotions ▪ Private or confidential
  10. 10. DISADVANTAGES OF ORAL COMMUNICATION ▪ Less authentic ▪ Less organized as compared to written communication ▪ Requires attentiveness and receptivity ▪ Long speeches may become unproductive at times ▪ Demands thinking coherently as one speaks ▪ Distance may become hurdle (Telephonic conversations) ▪ Important information is not documented
  11. 11. ▪ Think about both your content and your audience. Is your speech suitable? ▪ Understand the core message you are trying to get across and the three points you want your audience taking away with them ▪ Have an overview of your speech in mind before spending time on details ▪ Have a clear presentation structure and show it repeatedly to your audience so they know which section they are on and how long left ▪ Rehearse aloud. Record your voice and present to friends (if possible) to get feedback ▪ Try and keep your speech simple, focus on only a few points and explain them clearly ▪ Be enthusiastic, move around the stage and use body language to convey confidence ▪ Make a list of possible questions and rehearse answers for them
  12. 12. ▪ Generally, there are six types of oral communication activities that might be incorporated into curricula in many fields of study. i. One-to-One Speaking • Student-Student or Student-Teacher ii. Small Group or Team Based iii. Class Discussion iv. Debates or Deliberations v. Speech or Presentation vi. Oral Examination
  13. 13. i. ONE-TO-ONE SPEAKING ▪ Can range from moments punctuating a lecture, where students are asked to discuss or explain some question or problem with the person next to them, to formal student discussions with their instructor. ii. SMALL GROUP OR TEAM BASED COMM. ▪ Smaller scale settings for discussion, deliberation, and problem solving. Appropriate for both large lectures and smaller classes and allows levels of participation not possible in larger groups.
  14. 14. iii. CLASS DISCUSSION ▪ Typically less aggressive, argument-based and dialogic in character. Often times has the quality of creating an atmosphere of collective, out-loud thinking about some question, idea, problem, text, event, or artifact. It is a good way to encourage active learning. iv. DEBATES OR DELIBRATIONS ▪ A structured consideration of some issue from two or more points of view. Debates typically involve participants who argue one side throughout, while deliberation allows for movement by individuals within the process. Both feature reason-giving argument. Can be applied to issues of many kinds, from disputed scientific facts to theories, policy questions, the meaning of a text, or the quality of an artistic production. Can range from two participants to a lecture hall.
  15. 15. v. SPEECH OR PRESENTATION ▪ Classically, the stand-up, podium speech delivered by an individual from an outline or script. Also includes group presentations or spontaneous speaking. A dialogue can be built in with question and answer or discussion with the audience afterward. vi. ORAL EXAMINATION ▪ Can take place in the instructor’s office, in small groups, or before a whole class. Range from one oral question on an otherwise written exam to an oral defense of a written answer or paper to an entirely oral quiz or examination. Difficult with very large groups, but an excellent way to determine the depth and range of student knowledge and to stimulate high levels of preparation.

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