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Real Play HCD

  1. 1. Human Centred Design Challenge How might we enable more young people to become social entrepreneurs nua Brian Andrews & Niall Murray Ireland
  2. 2. Overview In the course of our research eighteen individuals within the community were interviewed at various stages within the Human Centred Design, HCD process. This sample contained a mix of students, parents, educators, community organisations, healthcare providers and sports bodies. The insights gained assisted our approach in refining our offering in providing an access route for potential young social entrepreneurs. This enriching experience having the potential in determining their career choice or an involvement with an existing Non Government Organisation, NGO. The level of positive engagement experienced indicates there is scope in developing a pilot scheme through which other educational institutions may follow. The basis of which we outline within our summary findings and observations as contained within this presentation. We also acknowledge our shortcomings within this scheme as presented. However the recurring theme in educating young people of their social responsibilities through the medium of learning through play is highly differentiated. To the extent with limited support young social entrepreneurs could establish RealPlay initiatives within their existing learning environment. Thus impacting positively to mutual benefit of all stakeholders.
  3. 3. Conventions & Context • Our team name “Nua”, is an Irish word meaning “New” • Transition Year (TY), is an optional learning opportunity for 16-17 year old Irish students through which they gain real world experience • Three dimensional learning is expressed as 3D with our prototype • (TY) creates space within the education system allowing students to reflect and consider their options prior to completing the academic curriculum. • The (TY) experience assists students in making study and career decisions based on their natural abilities in areas they may not have previously considered • On completion of (TY) a student has two further years of formal academic study, prior to entering university or work. • HCD research indicates there is an opportunity through (TY) to identify, deploy and incubate youth guided social entrepreneur projects which may influence student involvement in the sector
  4. 4. TY Student Circle of Life
  5. 5. Themes & Preliminary Outcomes In scoping our brief we identified three key themes. Based on establishing a local community pilot through which future schemes may be modelled. A pivotal outcome was identified through the concept of learning through Play. Thus in understanding the concept of learning through another (Play). We identified a strong learning metaphor through which youth engage their curiosity. Thus the premise RealPlay for the real world emerged. 1. Transition – Student opportunity should be aligned to a team based local community initiative. As opposed to multiple/individual and stand alone TY projects. 2. Mentoring – An identified panel integrates with transition year program. The panel consists of a broad skill bank through which students access expertise. 3. Community – Schools reside within local community and are based placed working with other stakeholders in identifying social capital initiatives.
  6. 6. Emergent Outcomes Further dialogue identified a three dimensional (3D) transition year RealPlay experience. Structured through three guiding principles below. 1. Guiding – School, community and panel 2. Experiencing – Student learns by doing 3. Reflecting – Student assimilates experience
  7. 7. Summary Sample Insights Transition The current TY program offers little opportunity in developing community initiatives. Students feel detached from the process and outcome. Some students may achieve more from the experience based on their family background and network. Mentoring Parents have a positive view of the potential TY impact on their children’s future career choice. Structured mentoring is rare as students seek multiple experiences without guidance or in-house expertise. Students have little involvement in what they learn. Community Schools require parental and community involvement in structuring meaningful local social entrepreneur projects. Through which students gain greater awareness and understanding of community issues. Sport plays an important role in developing a social conscience. Communicating with students through a popular communications platform is an essential component within a scheme
  8. 8. Discussion & Revision In refining our early research and preliminary findings. We identified one How Might We, HMW which encapsulated the theme and our later insights. This point also focused our thinking toward a realistic deliverable within the premise. It also framed our understanding of the associated complexity in ramping up the scheme. The other HMW questions proved too vague and overly complex to execute. However it was an interesting exploration process which reinforced our decision to develop HMW 4.
  9. 9. Reduction of HMW to One Red = No / Green- Yes 1. HMW, engage youth empowered and designed social projects within their local community through this platform? 2. HMW, Empower students to communicate and develop physical community dialogues and issues around local community problems which challenge, engage and educate? 3. HMW, Engage and deploy support in recognizing student driven TY initiatives through a merit system toward ongoing education and career opportunity? 4. HMW, engage and encourage TY students in preparing for the real world of work and potential commitment to the social economy? As we are a team of two our low fidelity story boarding and prototyping further refined our RealPlay offering.
  10. 10. Identity Stakeholders agree to identify the social entrepreneur program through this brand. There is agreement the logo encapsulates peoples ideas based on learning in groups in real world social enterprises. Guiding Principle The panel of mentors will guide and monitor student involvement. The students will engage in a mutually agreed local social entrepreneur project and are responsible for the completion of the task. Learning by doing!
  11. 11. Program Job Opportunities The mentoring team includes a TY supervisor, local community and business representatives. Modifying existing TY curriculum guidelines integrating with community & business support. TY students apply for a place on a three week community project. Students apply for a position which they maybe thinking of pursuing in life. Job specifications are aligned to responsibilities, and skill requirements. Project outcomes are identified in highlighting the skills and knowledge TY students will gain from their experience.
  12. 12. Communication Job Offers The school website is enable to communicate with the selected TY student project. Students, school staff and mentors can access and monitor progress. A dedicated Facebook page is enabled to assist student access to updates, instructions and other bulletins. A pilot group of twelve students with different talents is assembled. Skills are matched to specific roles and an organisational framework is developed. Tasks and responsibilities are identified, deliverable's are scheduled. The project gains momentum
  13. 13. Activity DesignElder Care Project An elder care centre partners the student pilot group in developing a student volunteer scheme through which students assist long stay residents. Students develop an activity program engaging residents in non-traditional interests. Here are some examples of their activity offerings Computer s, Digital Art, Model Building, Kitchen Garden, Companionship...
  14. 14. Learning Outcomes Reward Within this real world context TY students develop an understanding of community and social responsibility. They develop a deeper understanding of their innate talents and interpersonal skills. Which may determine their future role within the social economy. Students receive their Real Play young social entrepreneurs achievers award which they include within their CV. This also may be used as supporting evidence in accessing further educational opportunity within other social economy initiatives.
  15. 15. Personal Growth New Horizons Through this social facilitation exercise all stakeholders grow from the experience. To the extent people are outside their comfort zone in designing and implementing services. This is where growth occurs and can be a transformative influence in developing students. Students gain a broader understanding of local community needs and the shortcomings in society. To the extent the may get involved in other social initiatives or alternately may be encouraged to start the own social entrepreneur program.
  16. 16. Work In Progress • Slide 15 - Conclusions • Slide 16 - Follow up • Slide 17 - About the authors • Other: Image and graphic inserts embedded • Draft issues 29-30/03/15
  17. 17. Glossary • NGO – Non Government OrganisationA non-governmental organization (NGO) is any non-profit, voluntary citizens' group which is organized on a local, national or international level. www.ngo.org/ngoinfo/define.html

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