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SLWK 603.George.Fall 2014.Final

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SLWK 603.George.Fall 2014.Final

  1. 1. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 1 of 14 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY SLWK 603-004: SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL JUSTICE COURSE SYLLABUS - FALL SEMESTER – 2014 (CRN#24723) Location: Grace E. Harris Hall, 1015 Floyd Ave, Room 3103 Day and Time: Fridays from 8:00 am to 10:40 am Instructor: Cynthia George Email: georgecm@vcu.edu Office Hours: By appointment only COURSE DESCRIPTION SLWK 603. Social Work and Social Justice. Semester Course: 3 lecture hours. 3 Credits. Examines social work's historical and current commitment to social justice as related to oppressed groups in a multicultural society. Enhances understanding of and appreciation for diversity in self and others. Addresses issues of power, inequality, privilege, and resulting oppression. Analyzes oppression resulting from persistent social, educational, political, religious, economic, and legal inequalities. Focuses on the experiences of oppressed groups in the U.S. in order to understand their strengths, needs, and responses. Uses a social justice perspective for the study of and practice with oppressed groups, including those distinguished by race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, immigration status, and class. Considers ethical dilemmas faced by social workers in empowerment and advocacy roles. COURSE LEARNING UNITS I. Social Justice a. Introduction to Social Justice: Concepts and Definitions b. Social Justice, Economic Justice, and Social Work: Origins and Current Commitment i. Social Work's origins in Social Justice and Social Reform ii. Social Work's current commitment to Social Justice: Theory, Research,& Practice II. Diversity a. Concepts and Definitions i. Difference versus Inequality ii. The Social Construction of Difference b. Diversity in Self and Others III.Oppression and Oppressed Groups a. Concepts and Definition b. Coping and Adaptations i. Individuals, Couples, Families, and Groups ii. Policies, Organizations, and Communities IV. Power, Privilege, and Inequality a. Concepts and Definitions b. Power, Privilege, and Inequality in Self and Others V. Strategies for Social Justice a. Empowerment Strategies: Concepts and Definitions i. Individuals, Couples, Families, and Groups ii. Policies, Organizations, and Communities b. Advocacy: Concepts and Definitions c. Ethical Dilemmas
  2. 2. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 2 of 14 COURSE COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS (PB) Competency 2.1.1 - Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly a. Advocate for client access to the services of social work b. Practice personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional development Competency 2.1.2 – Apply social work practice ethical principles to guide professional practice a. Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice Competency 2.1.4 – Engage diversity and difference in practice a. Recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power b. Gain sufficient self-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups c. Recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of differences in shaping life experiences Competency 2.1.5 – Advance human rights and social and economic justice a. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination b. Advocate for human rights and social and economic justice c. Engage in practices that advance social and economic justice Competency 2.1.9 – Respond to contexts that shape practice a. Continuously discover, appraise and attend to changing locales, populations, scientific and technological developments and emerging societal trends to provide relevant services UNIVERSITY INFORMATION (required statements from the Provost - Last updated July 2014) VCU Email Policy Email is considered an official method for communication at VCU because it delivers information in a convenient, timely, cost-effective, and environmentally aware manner. Students are expected to check their official VCU email on a frequent and consistent basis in order to remain informed of university-related communications. The university recommends checking email daily. Students are responsible for the consequences of not reading, in a timely fashion, university-related communications sent to their official VCU student email account. This policy ensures that all students have access to this important form of communication. It ensures students can be reached through a standardized channel by faculty and other staff of the university as needed. Mail sent to the VCU email address may include notification of university-related actions, including disciplinary action. Please read the policy in its entirety: http://www.ts.vcu.edu/kb/3407.html. VCU Honor System: Upholding Academic Integrity The VCU Honor System policy describes the responsibilities of students, faculty and administration in upholding academic integrity, while at the same time respecting the rights of individuals to the due process offered by administrative hearings and appeals. According to this policy, "Members of the academic community are required to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of academic honesty and integrity." In addition, "All members of the VCU community are presumed to have an understanding of the VCU Honor System and are required to:
  3. 3. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 3 of 14  Agree to be bound by the Honor System policy and its procedures;  Report suspicion or knowledge of possible violations of the Honor System;  Support an environment that reflects a commitment to academic integrity;  Answer truthfully when called upon to do so regarding Honor System cases;  Maintain confidentiality regarding specific information in Honor System cases." More information can be found at in the VCU policy library at http://www.assurance.vcu.edu/Policy%20Library/Honor%20System.pdf. Student Conduct in the Classroom According to the Faculty Guide to Student Conduct in Instructional Settings (http://www.assurance.vcu.edu/Policy%20Library/Faculty%20Guide%20to%20Student%2 0Conduct%20in%20Instructional%20Settings.pdf), “The university is a community of learners. Students, as well as faculty, have a responsibility for creating and maintaining an environment that supports effective instruction. In order for faculty members (including graduate teaching assistants) to provide and students to receive effective instruction in classrooms, laboratories, studios, online courses, and other learning areas, the university expects students to conduct themselves in an orderly and cooperative manner." Among other things, cell phones and beepers should be turned off while in the classroom. The Student Code of Conduct also prohibits the possession of or carrying of any weapon. For more information see http://register.dls.virginia.gov/details.aspx?id=3436. Students with Disabilities Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, require that VCU provide "academic adjustments" or "reasonable accommodations" to any student who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity. To receive accommodations, students must request them by contacting the Disability Support Services Office on the Monroe Park Campus (828-2253) or the Division for Academic Success on the MCV campus (828-9782). Please also visit the Disability Support Services website at www.students.vcu.edu/dss and/or the Division for Academic Success website at www.healthsciences.vcu.edu/DAS/ for additional information. Any student who has a disability that requires an accommodation should schedule a meeting with the instructor at the student's earliest convenience. Additionally, if coursework requires the student to work in a lab environment, the student should advise the instructor or a department chairperson of any concerns that the student may have regarding safety issues related to a disability. Students should follow this procedure for all courses in the academic semester. Statement on Military Short-Term Training or Deployment If military students receive orders for short-term training or for deployment/mobilization, they should inform and present their orders to Military Student Services and to their professor(s). For further information on policies and procedures contact Military Services at 828-5993 or access the corresponding policies. Excused Absences for Students Representing the University Students who represent the university (athletes and others) do not choose their schedules. Student athletes are required to attend games and/or meets. All student athletes should provide their schedules to their instructors at the beginning of the semester. The Intercollegiate Athletic Council strongly encourages faculty to treat missed classes or exams (because of a scheduling conflict) as excused absences and urges faculty to work with the students to make up the work or exam.
  4. 4. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 4 of 14 Campus Emergency Information What to Know and Do to Be Prepared for Emergencies at VCU:  Sign up to receive VCU text messaging alerts. Keep your information up-to-date. Within the classroom, the professor will keep his or her phone on to receive any emergency transmissions.  Know the safe evacuation route from each of your classrooms. Emergency evacuation routes are posted in on-campus classrooms.  Listen for and follow instructions from VCU or other designated authorities. Within the classroom, follow your professor's instructions.  Know where to go for additional emergency information.  Know the emergency phone number for the VCU Police (828-1234).  Report suspicious activities and objects.  Keep your permanent address and emergency contact information current in eServices. Important Dates You can view important dates for the Fall 2014 semester in the university calendar (http://academiccalendars.vcu.edu/ac_fullViewAll.asp?term=Fall+2014). VCU Mobile The VCU Mobile application is a valuable tool to get the latest VCU information on the go. The application contains helpful information including the VCU directory, events, course schedules, campus maps, athletics and general VCU news, emergency information, library resources, Blackboard and more. To download the application on your smart phone or for more information, please visit http://m.vcu.edu. Class Registration Required for Attendance Students may attend only those classes for which they have registered. Faculty may not add students to class rosters or Blackboard. Therefore, if students are attending a class for which they have not registered, they must stop attending. Withdrawal from Classes Before withdrawing from classes, students should consult their instructor as well as other appropriate university offices. Withdrawing from classes may negatively impact a student’s financial aid award and his or her semester charges. To discuss financial aid and the student bill, visit the Student Services Center at 1015 Floyd Avenue (Harris Hall) and/or contact your financial aid counselor regarding the impact on your financial aid. Contact information for the University Financial Aid Office is available at http://www.enrollment.vcu.edu/finaid/contact-us/. Student Financial Responsibility Students assume the responsibility of full payment of tuition and fees generated from their registration and all charges for housing and dining services, and other applicable miscellaneous charges. Students are ultimately responsible for any unpaid balance on their account as a result of the University Financial Aid Office or their third party sponsor canceling or reducing their award(s).
  5. 5. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 5 of 14 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK - STANDARD COURSE POLICIES In order to assure the safest, most honest explorations of the sensitive issues in a course focusing on oppression, discrimination and their consequences for all, the following ground rules will be in force: 1. We acknowledge that social inequalities and oppression exist. 2. We acknowledge that we have all been systematically exposed to misinformation about groups to which we and others belong. 3. We cannot be blamed for misinformation we have learned, but we must take responsibility for repeating it after we have learned otherwise. 4. We will not blame victims for their oppression. 5. We will assume that people are doing the best they can. 6. We will actively pursue information about our own groups and those of others, share it with classmates and translate this knowledge into professional behavior. 7. We will not demean, devalue, or in any way "put down" people for their experiences, perceptions, questions, or comments. 8. We will respect the confidentiality of classroom discussions about specific individuals, groups, communities, and organizations that could be identified in any way. This includes information that classroom colleagues share about themselves. COURSE INFORMATION ATTENDANCE POLICY Students are expected to attend and participate in class meetings for their own learning benefit and in order to be accountable to the class. Missing more than 25% of class sessions will result in a lowered final grade. If class is cancelled for inclement weather or any other emergency reason, I will email you immediately. This email will come through the Blackboard system which is connected to your @vcu.edu email. INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTOR COURSE POLICIES/EXPECTATIONS Be on time and treat me and each other with respect. You will see that the assignments are designed to adapt to your interest areas and are also integrated into class participation, thus attendance and engagement will become very important indicators of your success in this course. We will all be working together to investigate “social justice” and how it relates to “Social Work.” Each assignment has a participation component and you must be present when the group discussion occurs in order to earn these points. Late assignments will not be accepted without prior approval. BLACKBOARD Students may access the course web site through Blackboard. Your login is your VCU email user name (the first part of your VCU email address) and your password is your VCU email password. If you do not know your VCU email password, call the University Computer Services help desk (828- 2227) or go to the help desk in Cabell library. It is important that you check your VCU email regularly during the semester for any emails the instructor or students in class may send you.
  6. 6. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 6 of 14 REQUIRED TEXT Rothenberg, P. (2014). Race, class, and gender in the United States (9th ed.). New York: Worth. Additional required readings: Course Reserves Reading List: A packet of supplementary required readings are available through the library’s electronic reserves at http://www.library.vcu.edu/research/reserves/. Readings relate to the concepts and topics identified in the course units below and supplement the readings from the text. A list of these readings is provided at the end of this syllabus and the Course Outline explains which readings are due on which class day according to the first author’s last name. These below are part of the in-class activity and will provide a framework for the action strategy students will complete for their final assignments. Both are available in the course Blackboard: Andrews, J., Newman, S., Meadows, O., Cox, M., & Bunting, S. (2012). Partnership readiness for community-based participatory research. Health Education Research, 27(4), 555-571. Tri-Ethnic Center for Prevention Research. (2014). Community Readiness for Community Change. Ft. Collins, CO: Colorado State University. Available to the public online at: http://triethniccenter.colostate.edu/CRhandbookcopy.htm A note about accessing and referencing appropriate sources: When you cite information from the textbook in any of your papers for this course, please cite with the essay author’s last name and the page number that contains the information you are citing. For example: (Greenhouse, p. 276). Follow APA formatting for all other citations. When you are quoting or otherwise significantly using an author’s work (such as paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas), you are expected to reference the source. When directly quoting an author’s words, you should use quotation marks or indented lines as well as indicate the page or paragraph number(s) in the in-text citation. You should use direct quotes sparingly in a paper. APA formatting is required for all papers. Handouts’ APA style can be tailored to fit space/content, but should include APA citations. You will need to conduct literature searches. Given the breadth of VCU Libraries’ services, you should find everything you need easily. However, these activities may entail time so you should begin the literature search process well before an assignment is due. The articles you want to review may require visits to the library to obtain hard copies and/or time to request articles or books through Interlibrary Loan. While each assignment does require at least one academic journal article, other media sources are also allowed in order to explore the multiple meanings of sociological concepts. Given the availability of information on the Internet, it is often difficult to evaluate the quality of online sources. It is expected that students will pay attention to the domain, sponsor, author background, and date of information on any websites used. All information obtained from websites should be properly cited in APA format.
  7. 7. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 7 of 14 GRADING EVALUATION CRITERIA The following general guidelines will be used to determine a grade for an assignment. You will receive 7 total grades, all of which will be averaged together for your overall grade for the course. Each assignment throughout the syllabus more clearly outlines what an “A” will look like for each. A. 90-100 = All or most aspects of the assignment are outstanding. The student responds completely to all parts of the assignment and demonstrates exceptional critical thinking ability, writing and presentation skills, and mastery of searching and retrieving relevant literature sources. Each assignment also has a participatory component where you must discuss what you have learned with the class in order to comfortably be in the “A” level. B. 80-89 = All or most aspects of the assignment are good. The student responds completely to all parts of the assignment and demonstrates sufficient critical thinking ability, writing and presentation skills, and mastery of searching and retrieving relevant literature sources. C. 70-79 = Most content requirements are met, but some parts of the assignment are not adequately developed. Assignment does not consistently demonstrate critical thinking ability, writing and presentation skills, and/or a mastery of searching and retrieving relevant literature. D. 60-69 = Major parts of the assignment are not addressed, and/or many of them are not adequately developed. Assignment does not demonstrate adequate critical thinking ability, writing and presentation skills, and/or a mastery of searching and retrieving relevant literature. F. Below 60 =Assignments that are not submitted as specified; those submitted where none of the parts of the assignment are addressed; and/or those submitted with plagiarized material. ASSIGNMENTS I. SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE NEWS - PAPER and GROUP DISCUSSION (due 10/10) Select an example of current news related to social justice and Social Work. The source of the news story can be a newspaper article, magazine, blog, social media site, or any other electronic or hard copy format by which news is transmitted. You should select a news story on a sociological topic that is of interest to you and one that is connected in some way to the social justice concepts we are discussing in class. Each student will complete a 3-4 page paper that: 1. Briefly summarizes the news story and how it relates to the course, 2. Discusses how this news story affects different people/groups differently, 3. Discusses what this news means for social justice, 4. Discusses what this news means for Social Work values and ethics. 5. Discusses how this news impacts Social Work practice behaviors. An “A” for this assignment will demonstrate the following:  90 points: Paper will discuss a current news story relevant to social justice and Social Work; contain accurate and concise summarizations of the news story; will be connected to concepts from assigned readings and/or other literature; will demonstrate critical thought in response to each of the questions specified above; will include APA references accurately linking to the news article and/or other sources referenced; and will be free of spelling and other errors.  10 points: Student will engage in a group discussion facilitated by the Instructor about the various news stories of interest to the class related to social justice in today’s world.
  8. 8. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 8 of 14 II. INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS ON COURSE UNITS a. Social Work’s origins in social justice assignment (due either 8/29 or 9/5) b. Power, Privilege, and Inequality assignment (due either 10/3 or 10/10) c. Strategies for social justice assignment (due either 10/31 or 11/7) For each of these three course units, the class will be divided into two groups. For each Course Unit area specified, there are assigned readings, with one day focused on micro and the other on more macro issues. All readings are required for all students. From the assigned readings for your scheduled presentation day (the order of which students will go when will be determined in class), identify 2-4 concepts that you want to better understand. Understand how the author of the assigned reading defines these concepts, and then locate at least 2 other sources to see how the concepts are defined by other authors. Assignment Deliverables for each of these 3 assignments are: 1. Prepare a 2 page handout on which you will: a. Identify 2-4 key concepts from any of the assigned the readings that interest you and i. Define them according to the author of the associated assigned reading, ii. Define them from the perspective of at least 2 additional sources (1 reference must be an academic journal article, the others can be any other source) b. Using the multiple perspectives on the concepts and your own experience, respond to: i. Do these concepts mean different things to different people? Why/Why not? ii. What do these concepts mean for social justice? iii. What do these concepts mean for Social Work values and ethics? iv. How do these concepts impact Social Work practice behaviors? 2. Give a 5-10 min. presentation: a. Provide paper copies of your handout to your classmates and instructor, b. Give a brief summary/overview of the key concepts you researched, and c. Give a brief summary of what these concepts mean for social justice and Social Work. Note: The purpose of the handout is so that the instructor will be able to clearly identify if you completed the assignment. If you take a direct quote when defining a concept, use quotation marks and cite. The presentation is to help make sure that the class understands the key concepts you have researched so that we can have a larger group discussion about what these concepts may mean. Given the time frame and other specifications, you can do this however you think will be most effective. You may use simply the assigned handout and your voice, PPT slides, additional handouts or materials, demonstrations, activities, YouTube video or other clip, whatever you feel you need in order to communicate the concepts for comprehension. An “A” for each of these assignments will demonstrate the following:  80 points: Handout will contain clear concepts; accurate summarizations of the authors definitions from the assigned readings; at least 2 additional perspectives on what these concepts mean, 1 of which is an academic journal article; will demonstrate critical thought in responses to each of the questions specified above; will be useful to classmates in understanding the concepts discussed; will include APA references accurately; and will be free of spelling and other errors.  20 points: Presentation will review the definitions of the concepts in a concise and comprehensible way; will stay on topic and be less than 10 min. long; and be engaging and informative to the group.
  9. 9. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 9 of 14 III. INDIVIDUAL DIVERSITY PAPERS and GROUP DISCUSSIONS a. Diversity among groups assignment (Due 9/12) b. Diversity of self assignment (Due 9/19) Being reflexive and developing critical self-awareness is a major objective of the course and this assignment is designed to help students consider 1) externally what diversity means among groups, and then 2) internally what diversity means within themselves. For each of the two assignments listed below, assignment deliverables include: 1. Prepare a 2-3 page paper on the specified topic below 2. Participate in a group discussion using your experiences in completing the assignment (as you feel comfortable sharing in a large group). Note: When discussing concepts of oppression, use the assigned readings as a jumping off point, but you should also use additional chapters in the text and/or your outside readings. These papers should be in APA format and include references wherever appropriate. However, these are also reflexive papers that will likely refer to real world events such as class discussion and/or life experience. You do not need to cite the latter of these, but do be clear in your writing when you are drawing on personal experience to ground your perspective. a. Diversity among groups assignment (Due 9/12) Spend some time reflecting on a group considered to be oppressed, which could be related to gender, race, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, class, and/or disability. Then, write a 2-3 page paper that addresses the following areas: 1. How is oppression conceptualized by outsiders looking in on this group? 2. How is oppression conceptualized by insiders among this group? 3. Do different members of this group experience oppression differently? 4. Discuss how you feel about yourself in respect to this group. 5. Describe how you believe your personal characteristics might impact your ability to practice as a social worker with this group. What practice behaviors will you need to be proficient in? b. Diversity of self assignment (Due 9/19) Spend some time reflecting on who you are as a person related to gender, race, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, class, and/or disability. Then, write a paper that addresses the following areas: 1. Identify 2-3 of the concepts of difference from the readings that resonate with you. 2. Use your personal experiences to discuss what these concepts have meant in your life. 3. Discuss the ways in which you consider yourself and/or feel you are perceived to be either oppressed and/or privileged. Are these perceptions fair? Why or why not? 4. Describe how you believe your personal characteristics might impact your social work practice. Which areas of practice behaviors could you stand to improve your proficiency in? An “A” for these assignments will demonstrate the following:  90 points: Paper will discuss difference as a concept, construct, or theory; will demonstrate reflexivity and critical thought in response to each of the questions specified above; will demonstrate ability to recognize power and privilege; how your personal characteristics influence self concept and concept of others; how personal characteristics connect with professional work; will include APA references; and will be free of spelling and other errors.  10 points: Student will participate in a group discussion facilitated by the Instructor about diversity in today’s world. Students will demonstrate the ability to discuss difference as a concept, construct, or theory; as well as a phenomenon of human experience in a mutually respectful way with all participants.
  10. 10. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 10 of 14 IV. FINAL - GROUP ACTION PLANNING and GROUP PRESENTATIONS Groups formalized (in class on 9/5); Topics approved by Instructor (in class on 9/19); Outlines approved by Instructor (draft outline due 11/7 – revisions of drafts due 11/14) a. Group presentations due (due either 11/21 or 12/5) Students will form special interest groups early in the semester to explore social work's responsibility and commitment to social reform, advocacy, and social justice. Student groups will focus on an identified social justice issue/topic to explore how it impacts an identified group/s considered to be oppressed. Students will work together throughout the course to understand the issue/topic, the group/s it impacts, and to develop a Social Work change strategy to promote social justice and present it to the class. Presentation formats will be decided by each group and may include PPTs, debates, role plays, audio/visual aids, etc. Groups should develop strategies for engaging the class in discussion and raising or responding to questions. The presentation length will be approximately 45 min. (exact time will be decided in class based on the number of groups that form) and will address: 1. What is your issue/topic and how is it related to social justice? 2. What data are available locally and nationally to describe the persons and/or groups who are impacted by this issue? How do different people experience this issue in different ways? 3. What groups are attempting to address the issue? How has Social Work been involved? 4. How effective are the alliances, coalitions, and support groups which advocate on behalf of impacted people and/or groups? What do these groups need to be more successful? 5. Design a strategy to improve social justice related to this issue. a. What is the purpose of your strategy? b. How can you be sure the group you want to impact is ready for proposed changes? c. Who will be the key players needed to plan and enact your strategy? d. What tactics will you use to facilitate change? e. How will you know if your efforts are working or not along the way? How will you know when you are done? f. What Social Work practice behaviors would be needed to do this in the real world? Each group will prepare at minimum the following for distribution to the class on the day of the presentation: 1) presentation outline, 2) reference page, and 3) either a handout and/or PPT slides that at minimum define the conceptualization of the social justice issue/topic, related target group/s and strategy framework. Each group member will also 4) send a brief email to the Instructor within 24 hours after giving their group presentation with the subject line “My Role” which outlines the role and/or specific tasks taken on as an individual in the project and towards supporting the group. An “A” for this assignment will demonstrate the folllwing:  70 points: Group Grade. Materials distributed to the class will contain clear concepts presented with accuracy, clarity, organization, and thoroughness; will demonstrate critical thought and effective group processes in responses to each of the questions specified above; will present a feasible and innovative strategy consistent with Social Work practice standards; will include APA references accurately; and will be free of spelling and other errors.  20 points: Group Grade. Outline draft and in-class group work completed as specified; presentation demonstrates group knowledge about and sensitivity to the target population and address the assignment questions; stays on topic and within the specified time; and is engaging and informative to the group; innovative style and originality of presentation; outstanding engagement of the class and discussion around creating social change in today’s world.  10 points: Individual Grade. Student demonstrates knowledge about and sensitivity to the target population; plays a role in addressing the assignment questions during the in-class planning and presentation; supports other group members to be successful with integrity; and submits the “My Role” email as described above.
  11. 11. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 11 of 14 COURSE SCHEUDLE DATE COME TO CLASS HAVING COMPLETED THESE TASKS: COME TO CLASS PREPARED TO TURN IN AND/OR ENGAGE IN: 8/22  Read: Syllabus & Blackboard content  To do: Discuss the syllabus and the course; introductions  Finalize Student Presentation Days Course Unit: Social Justice 8/29  Read: (Lit – Brill, 2001; NASW, 1996; Swenson, 1998; Morris, 2002; Text – Baker-Miller, p. 110; Lareau, p. 180; Barry, p. 296; Silverstein, 1981)  Complete: Social Work’s origins in social justice assignment Social Justice DAY 1: (micro focus)  Turn in: Social Work’s origins in social justice assignment (Group 1)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned 9/5  Read: (Lit – Pharr, 1988; Van Soest, 2003; Carlton-LaNey, 1999; Text – Thrupkaew, p. 248; Rothschild, p. 294; Kochhar, et al., p. 355; Plessy vs. Ferguson, p. 547)  Complete: Social Work’s origins in social justice assignment Social Justice DAY 2: (macro focus)  Turn in: Social Work’s origins in social justice assignment (Group 2)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned  Finalize Final Presentation Groups Course Units: Diversity and Oppression and Oppressed Groups 9/12  Read: (Lit – Ridlen, 1992; Binstock, 2005; Finn, 2009; Kornblatt, 2002; Text – Davidson-Buck, p. 33; Baynton, p. 94; Mantsios, p. 189; US Commission on Civil Rights, p. 263; Griscom, p. 472)  Complete: Diversity among groups assignment Diversity DAY 1: (macro focus)  Turn in: Diversity among groups assignment (Everyone)  To do: Group Discussion on Diversity and oppression among groups 9/19  Read: (Lit – Smedley, 2005; Galambos, 1997; Hayes-Bautista, 2002; Levy, 2001; Text – Wright, p. 23; Lorber, p. 54; Hubbard, p. 66; McIntosh, p.175; Rich, p. 377; Terkel, p. 482)  Complete: Diversity of self assignment Diversity DAY 2: (micro focus)  Turn in: Diversity of self assignment (Everyone)  To do: Group Discussion on Diversity and oppression of self  Finalize Group Presentation Topics Course Unit: Power, Privilege, and Inequality (PP&I) 9/26  Read: (Lit – Aisenberg, 2008; Dean, 2001; Kogut, 1972; Reisch, 2008; Text – Brave Bird, et al., p. 410; Mantsios, p. 618; Davis, p. 641; Rothschild, p. 689)  Complete: Power, Privilege, and Inequality assignment (Group 1) PP&I DAY 1: (micro focus)  Turn in: Power, Privilege, and Inequality assignment (Group 1)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned 10/3  Read: (Lit – Healy, 2001; International Federation of SWers, 2000; Text – Act on Governing Negroes, p. 501; Act prohibiting teaching of slaves, p. 512; US Constitutional amendments, p. 530; Parenti, p. 611; Klein, p. 683)  Complete: PP&I assignment (Group 2) PP&I DAY 2: (macro focus)  Turn in: Power, Privilege, and Inequality assignment (Group 2)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned
  12. 12. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 12 of 14 COURSE SCHEUDLE DATE COME TO CLASS HAVING COMPLETED THESE TASKS: COME TO CLASS PREPARED TO TURN IN AND/OR ENGAGE IN: Course Unit: Strategies for Social Justice 10/10  Read: Relevant news articles  Complete: Social Justice in the News Assignment  Turn in: Social Justice in the News Assignment (Everyone)  To do: Group discussion on social justice in today’s news 10/17 Reading Day. No class. 10/24  Read: (Lit – Everett, 2007; Manning, 2004; Palmer, 2002; Text – Kim, p. 465; Hirshman, p. 568; hooks, p. 657; Thompson, p. 665; Leonard, p. 679)  Complete: Strategies for social justice assignment Strategies for SJ DAY 1: (micro focus)  Turn in: Strategies for social justice assignment (Group 1)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned *The last day to withdraw from this course with a “W” on your transcript is 10/31/2014. 10/31*  Read: (Lit – Figueira-McDonough, 1993; Text – West, p. 335; US Commission on Human Rights, p. 501; DuBois, p. 532; Jhally, p. 603; Ayvazian, p. 672)  Complete: Strategies for social justice assignment Strategies for SJ DAY 2: (macro focus)  Turn in: Strategies for social justice assignment (Group 2)  To do: Student presentations, as assigned 11/7  Read: Whatever you need for your group presentation  Complete: Work with your group to have a presentation outline draft on paper to discuss with the instructor  Turn in: Group outline drafts due  To do: Time to work in groups with instructor present to discuss each group’s outline and plan to complete the assignment 11/14  Read: (Lit from Blackboard - Andrews, 2012; Tri-Ethnic Center, 2014; Lit – Anderson, 2003)  Complete: Whatever you need to do for your final group presentation  Turn in: Revised group outlines (if applicable)  To do: Considering “Readiness for Change” group planning activity Course Final Presentations: Putting Knowledge into Action 11/21  Read: Whatever you need for your group presentation  Complete: Final assignment for Groups 1&2 Final DAY 1:  Turn in: Final assignment (Group 1&2)  To do: Final group presentations, as assigned 11/28 Fall Break. No class. 12/5  Read: Whatever you need for your group presentation  Complete: Final assignment for Groups 3&4 Final DAY 2:  Turn in: Final assignment (Group 3&4)  To do: Final group presentations, as assigned
  13. 13. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 13 of 14 SLWK 603 Social Work and Social Justice REQUIRED COURSE READINGS – Course Reserves Reading List A packet of supplementary required readings are available through the library’s electronic reserves at http://www.library.vcu.edu/research/reserves/. Readings relate to the concepts and topics identified in the course units below and supplement the readings from the text. These include seminal pieces collected over the years by VCU faculty stewarding the development of this course. Introduction to Social Justice: Concepts and Definitions Swenson, C. R. (1998). Clinical social work’s contribution to a social justice perspective. Social Work, 43, 527-537. Van Soest, D. (2003). Advancing social and economic justice. In D. Lum (Ed.) Culturally competent practice: A framework for understanding diverse groups and justice issues (2nd ed.) (pp. 345-376). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. Morris, P.M. (2002). The capabilities perspective: A framework for social justice. Families in Society, 83(4), 365-373. Social Justice, Economic Justice, and Social Work: Origins and Current Commitment Aisenberg, E. (2008) Evidence-based practice in mental health care to ethnic minority communities: Has its practice fallen short of its evidence? Social Work, 53 (4) 297-306. Anderson, J. (2003). Strengths perspective. In J. Anderson & R.W. Carter Diversity perspectives for social work practice (pp. 11-20). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Carlton-LaNey, I. (1999). African American social work pioneers’ response to need. Social Work, 44(3), 311-321. Healy, L.M. (2001). Global independence and social work. In International social work: Professional action in an interdependent world (pp. 105-125). New York: Oxford Press. International Federation of Social Workers. (2000). International Statement of Peace and Social Justice and International Statement on Human Rights. Kogut, A. (1972). The settlements and ethnicity: 1890-1914. Social Work, 17(3), 22-31. Reisch, M. (2008). From melting pot to multiculturalism: The impact of racial and ethnic diversity on social work and social justice in the USA. British Journal of Social Work, 38, 788-804. Diversity Concepts and Definitions Ridlen, S., & Dane, E. (1992). Individual and social implications of human differences. Journal of Multicultural Social Work, 2(2), 25-41. Smedley, A., & Smedley, B.D. (2005). Race as biology is fiction, racism as a social problem is real: Anthropological and historical perspectives on the social construction of race. American Psychologist, 60(1), 16-28. Dean, R. (2001). The myth of cross-cultural competence. Families in Society, 82(6), 623-630.
  14. 14. COURSE SYLLABUS for SLWK 603: Social Work and Social Justice Last Revised: 8/20/2014 Page 14 of 14 Readings for Age/Ageism Binstock, R. H. (2005, Fall). Old-age policies, politics, and ageism. Ageism in the New Millennium, pp. 73-78. Finn, J. L. (2009). Child’s-eye view. In L. M. Nybell, J. J. Shook, & J. L. Finn (Eds.). Childhood, youth, and social work in transformation (pp. 317-336). New York: Columbia University Press. Hayes-Bautista, D.E., Hsu, P., Perez, A., & Gamboa, C. (2002). The ‘browning’ of the graying of America: Diversity in the elderly population and policy implications. Generations, 26(3), 15-24. Kornblatt, S., Eng, C., & Hausen, J.C. (2002). Cultural awareness in health and social services: The experience of On Lok. Generations, 26(3), 46-53. Levy, B. R. (2001). Eradication of ageism requires addressing the enemy within. The Gerontologist, 41(5), 578-579. Silverstein, S. (1981). “The little boy and the old man.” In S. Silverstein’s A light in the attic. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publisher. Strategies for Social Justice Empowerment Strategies Everett, J.E., Homstead, K., & Drisko, J. (2007). Frontline worker perceptions of the empowerment process in community-based agencies. Social Work, 52(2), 161-170. Manning, M.C., Cornelius, L, & Okundaye, J. N. (2004). Empowering African Americans through social work practice: Integrating an Afrocentric perspective, ego psychology, and spirituality. Families in Society, 85(2), 229-235. Palmer, I., & Nascimento, O. (2002). Health Action Theatre by Seniors: Community development and education with groups of diverse languages and cultures. Generations, 26(3), 65-67. Figueira-McDonough, J. (1993). Policy practice: The neglected side of social work intervention. Social Work, 38(2), 179-188. Ethical Dilemmas Brill, C.K. (2001). Looking at the social work profession through the eye of the NASW Code of Ethics. Research on Social Work Practice, 11(2), 223-234. National Association of Social Workers. (1996). Code of Ethics. Washington, DC: Author. [Not on E-Reserve; Available on-line: http://www.naswdc.org] Galambos, C.M. (1997). Resolving ethical conflicts in providing case management services to the elderly. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 27(4), 57-67. Pharr, S. (1988). The common elements of oppressions. In S. Pharr Homophobia: A weapon of sexism (pp. 53-64). Inverness, CA: Chardon Press.

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