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CITERS Keynote

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CITERS Keynote

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CITERS Keynote

  1. 1. Scaling up Assessment for Learning CITERS 2017, June 9 Professor David Carless University of Hong Kong The University of Hong Kong
  2. 2. Overview • Assessment for learning (AfL) • AfL & MOOCs • Peer feedback & technology • Leadership & communities of practice The University of Hong Kong
  3. 3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. 4. Chapter 1: Scaling up AfL: Progress & prospects (Carless) Chapter 14: How does Technology enable Scaling up AfL? (Dawson & Henderson) The University of Hong Kong
  5. 5. AfL definition Assessment for which the first priority is promoting students’ learning (Black et al., 2004) Cf. Formative assessment Learning-oriented assessment (Carless, 2007, 2015a) The University of Hong Kong
  6. 6. Interlinked AfL strategies 1. Productive assessment design 2. Students making judgments 3. Effective feedback processes 4. Developing student appreciation of quality (Carless, 2017) The University of Hong Kong
  7. 7. Scaling up (Coburn, 2003) Spread Depth Sustainability Shifts in ownership The University of Hong Kong
  8. 8. Why scale-up AfL? Research evidence (Black & Wiliam, Hattie) Dissatisfaction with current assessment & feedback practices The University of Hong Kong
  9. 9. Black & Wiliam (1998) Formative assessment & learning gains Effect sizes: 0.4 - 0.7 … But implementation is generally weak The University of Hong Kong
  10. 10. Hattie: Visible Learning The University of Hong Kong
  11. 11. MOOCs & AfL The University of Hong Kong
  12. 12. MOOC Assessment design Alignment of goals, activities & low-stakes assessment MC quizzes + automated feedback Higher order thinking? The University of Hong Kong
  13. 13. Peer assessment Peer reviewed assignments + detailed rubrics as key feature of MOOCs (Admiraal et al, 2015; Huisman et al., 2016) The University of Hong Kong
  14. 14. Reliability of PA Moderate reliability of peer assessment (Admiraal et al., 2015) Use of multiple peer assessments to mitigate variance in judgments (Hew, 2016) The University of Hong Kong
  15. 15. Peer feedback for learning Learners gain more from composing than receiving peer feedback (Nicol et al., 2014) The University of Hong Kong
  16. 16. Peer & Self-evaluation Students did 5 peer reviews then self- evaluated own work (Hew, 2016) The University of Hong Kong
  17. 17. FEEDBACK PROCESSES & TECHNOLOGY The University of Hong Kong
  18. 18. Audio & Video feedback Rapport Nuance Personalisation Monologue or Dialogue? Time saver? The University of Hong Kong
  19. 19. Peer video feedback Peer-to-peer video feedback delivered via Facebook Hung (2016) The University of Hong Kong
  20. 20. Personalised feedback at scale Using learning analytics to scale the provision of personalised feedback https://www.ontasklearning.org/ The University of Hong Kong
  21. 21. Sustainable feedback Students generating & using feedback from peers or self as part of self-regulated learning (Carless et al., 2011) The University of Hong Kong
  22. 22. DEVELOPING STUDENT APPRECIATION OF QUALITY The University of Hong Kong
  23. 23. MOOC limitation? MOOCs do not systematically develop student understanding of quality (Dawson & Henderson, 2017) The University of Hong Kong
  24. 24. Using exemplars The University of Hong Kong Exemplars convey messages that nothing else can (Sadler, 2002)
  25. 25. The University of Hong Kong
  26. 26. Appreciating quality Students need to debate nature of quality & develop capacities in making judgments The University of Hong Kong
  27. 27. SCALING UP POSSIBILITIES The University of Hong Kong
  28. 28. Enhancing design Adding technology to existing design & expecting improvements is flawed Invest in improved assessment & feedback designs to leverage gains from technology (Dawson & Henderson, 2017) The University of Hong Kong
  29. 29. Leadership Resourcing & support Incentives & rewards The University of Hong Kong
  30. 30. TELI Technology-Enhanced Learning Initiative The University of Hong Kong Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning) Ricky Kwok
  31. 31. Incentives Teaching Innovation Award Teaching Feedback Award The University of Hong Kong
  32. 32. Communities of practice (CoPs) Surfacing and sharing AfL practices (Hounsell & Zou, 2017) The University of Hong Kong
  33. 33. Staff development Good CoPs Dialogue & communication The University of Hong Kong
  34. 34. References Admiraal, W., Huisman, B., & Pilli, O. (2015). Assessment in massive open online courses. The Electronic Journal of e-Learning, 13(4), 207-216. Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee, C., Marshall, B., & Wiliam, D. (2004). Working inside the black box: Assessment for learning in the classroom. Phi Delta Kappan, 86(1), 8-21. Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education, 5(1), 7-74. Carless, D. (2007). Learning-oriented assessment: Conceptual basis and practical implications. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 44(1), 57-66. Carless, D. (2015a). Exploring learning-oriented assessment processes. Higher Education, 69(6), 963-976. Carless, D. (2015b). Excellence in University Assessment: learning from award-winning teachers. London: Routledge. Carless, D. & K.K.H. Chan (2016). Managing dialogic use of exemplars. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2016.1211246 Carless, D., Salter, D., Yang, M., & Lam, J. (2011). Developing sustainable feedback practices. Studies in Higher Education, 36(4), 395-407. Coburn, C. (2003). Rethinking scale: Moving beyond numbers to deep and lasting change. Educational Researcher, 32(6), 3-12. The University of Hong Kong
  35. 35. References Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning. London: Routledge. Hew, K. F. (2016). Promoting engagement in online courses: What strategies can we learn from three highly rated MOOCS. British Journal of Educational Technology, 47(2), 320-341. Hounsell, D. & Zou, T. (2017). Surfacing and Sharing Advances in Assessment: A Communities-of-practice approach. In D. Carless, S. Bridges, C.K.W. Chan & R. Glofcheski (Eds.), Scaling up Assessment for learning in Higher Education. Singapore: Springer. Huisman, B., Admiraal, W., Pilli, L., van de Ven, M., & Saab, N. (2016). Peer assessment in MOOCs: The relationship between peer reviewers’ ability and authors’ essay performance. British Journal of Educational Technology. Doi: 10.1111/bjet.12520. Hung, S.-T. A. (2016). Enhancing feedback provision through multimodal video technology. Computers & Education, 98, 90-101. Nicol, D., Thomson, A., & Breslin, C. (2014). Rethinking feedback practices in higher education: a peer review perspective. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39(1), 102–122. Sadler, D. R. (2002). Ah! … So that’s ‘quality’. In P. Schwartz & G. Webb (Eds.), Assessment: Case Studies, Experience and Practice from Higher Education (p.130- 136). London: Kogan Page. The University of Hong Kong
  36. 36. THANK YOU The University of Hong Kong

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