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Special Challenges in Career Management - PPT 12.pptx

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Special Challenges in Career Management - PPT 12.pptx

  1. 1. 12 - 1 Special Challenges in Career Management
  2. 2. 1. Design an effective socialization program for employees. 2. Discuss why a dual-career path is necessary for professional and managerial employees. 3. Provide advice on how to help a plateaued employee. 4. Develop policies to help employees and the company avoid technical obsolescence. 12 - 2
  3. 3. 5. Develop policies to help employees deal with work-and-life conflict. 6. Select and design outplacement strategies that minimize the negative effects on displaced employees and “survivors.” 7. Explain why retirees may be valuable as part- time employees. 12 - 3
  4. 4.  Many companies in Silicon Valley face serious career management challenges.  These companies are now paying more attention to career management issues because their work force is starting to age and pay more attention to work-life balance.  Many employees face long commutes because they can not afford to live close to where they work. 12 - 4
  5. 5. 12 - 5 If companies do not help their employees with their personal lives, they may leave for jobs with other companies in other areas that do.
  6. 6. 12 - 6 Socialization and Orientation Dual-Career Paths Plateauing Skills Obsolescence Work and Non-work Policies Balancing Work and Life Coping With Job Loss Dealing With Older Workers
  7. 7.  Organizational socialization is the process by which new employees are transformed into effective members of the company.  The purpose of orientation is to:  Prepare employees to perform their jobs effectively  Learn about the organization  Establish work relationships 12 - 7
  8. 8. 12 - 8 Anticipatory Socialization Encounter Settling In
  9. 9. 12 - 9 History Company Goals Language Politics People Performance Proficiency
  10. 10.  Play an important role in socializing employees.  Effective socialization programs result in employees having a strong commitment and loyalty to the company.  This reduces turnover.  Effective orientation programs include active involvement of the new employee.  Effective programs have peers, managers, and senior co-workers actively involved. 12 - 10
  11. 11.  Company-Level Information Company overview Key policies and procedures Compensation Employee benefits & services Safety & accident protection Employee & union relations Physical facilities Economic factors  Department-Level Information Department functions Job duties & responsibilities Policies, procedures, rules Performance expectations Tour of department Introduction to co-workers  Miscellaneous Community Housing Family adjustment 12 - 11
  12. 12.  Employees are encouraged to ask questions.  Program includes information on both technical and social aspects of the job.  Orientation is the responsibility of the new employee’s manager.  Debasing and embarrassing new employees is avoided.  Formal and informal interactions with managers and peers occur.  Programs involve relocation assistance.  Employees receive information about the company’s products, services, and customers. 12 - 12
  13. 13.  A career path is a sequence of job positions involving similar types of work and skills that employees move through in the company.  For companies with professional employees, a key issue is how to ensure that they feel they are valued.  The traditional career path model has limited advancement opportunities for those in the technical career path. 12 - 13
  14. 14. 12 - 14 Individual Contributor Career Path Management Career Path Scientist Research Scientist Principal Research Scientist Assistant Manager Manager Department Manager Assistant Director Assistant Director
  15. 15. 12 - 15 A dual-career-path system enables employees to remain in a technical career path or move into a management career path.
  16. 16. 12 - 16 MANAGEMENT LADDER TECHNICAL LADDER Senior Associate Associate Engineers, Programmers, Scientists Project Development Senior Functional Management Executives Staff Advisory Senior Senior Technical Staff Member Fellow Example of a dual-career-path system
  17. 17.  Salary, status, and incentives for technical employees compare favorably with those of managers.  Individual contributors’ base salary may be lower than managers’, but they are given opportunities to increase their total compensation through bonuses.  The individual contributor career path is not used to satisfy poor performers who have no managerial potential. 12 - 17
  18. 18.  The career path is for employees with outstanding technical skills.  Individual contributors are given the opportunity to choose their career path.  The company provides assessment resources.  Assessment information enables employees to make comparisons between their interests and abilities with those of employees in technical and managerial positions. 12 - 18
  19. 19.  Plateauing means that the likelihood of the employee receiving future job assignments with increased responsibility is low.  Mid-career employees are most likely to plateau.  Plateauing becomes dysfunctional when the employee feels stuck in a job that offers no potential for personal growth.  Such frustration results in poor job attitude, increased absenteeism, and poor job performance. 12 - 19
  20. 20.  Discrimination based on age, gender, or race.  Lack of ability.  Lack of training.  Low need for achievement.  Unfair pay decisions or dissatisfaction with pay raises.  Confusion about job responsibilities.  Slow company growth resulting in reduced development opportunities. 12 - 20
  21. 21.  Employee understands the reasons for plateau.  Employee is encouraged to participate in development activities.  Employee is encouraged to seek career counseling.  Employee reality-tests his solutions. 12 - 21
  22. 22.  Obsolescence – a reduction in an employee’s competence resulting from a lack of knowledge of new work processes, techniques, and technologies that have developed since the employee completed her education.  Not just a concern of technical and professional occupations. All employees are at risk.  Obsolescence needs to be avoided if companies are trying to become learning organizations. 12 - 22
  23. 23. 12 - 23 Update d Skills Manager Company Climate Reward System Peers • Provide Challenging Work Assignments • Encourage Employees to Acquire New Skills • Discuss Ideas • Share Information • Emphasis on Continuous Learning • Sabbaticals • Pay for New Ideas • Pay for Employee Development
  24. 24.  Families with a working husband, homemaker wife, and two or more children account for only 7 percent of American families.  The increasing number of two-career couples and single heads of households creates a challenge for companies.  Companies have to carefully consider how to manage employees who are simultaneously meeting the needs of both work and family. 12 - 24
  25. 25.  There are two roles that training can play in balancing work and non-work.  Trainers and managers may be responsible for developing policies and procedures.  Trainers may be responsible for developing training programs to teach managers their role in administering and overseeing the use of work-life policies. 12 - 25
  26. 26. 12 - 26 Time-based Conflict Strain-based Conflict Behavior-based Conflict
  27. 27.  Communicating information about work and non-work policies and job demands.  Flexibility in work arrangements and work schedules.  Redesigning jobs.  Support Services. 12 - 27
  28. 28.  The impact of job sharing on clients and customers must be determined.  The employee interested in job sharing must find another employee performing the same job who wants reduced work hours.  The two people sharing the job need to have similar work values and motivations.  The manager must actively communicate with the job-sharing employees.  All schedules and work assignments need coordination.  Performance measurement should be both team and individual. 12 - 28
  29. 29.  Important career management issue because of the increased use of downsizing to deal with excess employees resulting from corporate restructuring, mergers, acquisitions, and takeovers.  Companies that lay off employees can experience lowered job commitment, distrust of management, and difficulties recruiting new employees.  Job loss causes stress and disrupts the personal lives of laid-off employees. 12 - 29
  30. 30.  From a career management standpoint, companies and managers have two major responsibilities:  They are responsible for helping employees who will lose their jobs.  Steps must be taken to ensure that the “survivors” of the layoff (remaining employees) remain productive and committed to the organization. 12 - 30
  31. 31.  Companies need to provide outplacement services to help prepare employees for layoffs:  Advance warning and explanation for a layoff.  Psychological, financial, and career counseling.  Assessment of skills and interests.  Job campaign services.  Job banks.  Electronic delivery of job openings. 12 - 31
  32. 32.  Meeting the needs of older workers.  Pre-retirement socialization.  Retirement.  Early retirement programs. 12 - 32
  33. 33.  Flexibility in scheduling to allow for care of sick spouses, return to school, travel, or reduced work hours.  Older workers should receive the training they need to avoid skill obsolescence.  Older employees need resources and referral help that addresses long-term care and elder care.  Companies need to ensure that employees do not hold inappropriate stereotypes about older employees. 12 - 33

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