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Which Canary Islands Points of Interest is Best for Families?

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Which Canary Islands Points of Interest is Best for Families?

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All of them! It’s no wonder the Canaries were once known as the Fortunate Isles; this volcanic archipelago of 7 islands off southwest Morocco is a near-perfect holiday destination.

All of them! It’s no wonder the Canaries were once known as the Fortunate Isles; this volcanic archipelago of 7 islands off southwest Morocco is a near-perfect holiday destination.

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Which Canary Islands Points of Interest is Best for Families?

  1. 1. All of them! It’s no wonder the Canaries were once known as the Fortunate Isles; this volcanic archipelago of 7 islands off southwest Morocco is a near-perfect holiday destination. There’s a subtropical climate with year-round sunshine, and a host of natural attractions: beautiful coastlines, national parks, and lush topiary. Families come for the glorious beaches and great- value family-friendly hotels, plus there’s no jetlag as you’re on European time.
  2. 2. The ‘Island of Eternal Spring’, Tenerife is the largest and most touristy of the Canaries, and served by the most flights. While some of the island has been over- developed (in the south), half is protected for its astonishing biodiversity across 6 different vegetation zones and many ravines and valleys. In the middle, UNESCO-listed Teide National Park holds Spain’s highest mountain, the Pico del Teide volcano, and an observatory (there’s great stargazing on the Canaries). The craggy coastline has plentiful beaches; those in the north have black volcanic sand.
  3. 3. More tropical than its cohorts, Lanzarote, the most easterly of the archipelago, has extraordinary lunar volcanic landscapes, such as the Mountains of Fire craters in the Parque Nacional de Timanfaya. Contraty to popular belief, the island is wonderfully undeveloped – flat-roofed whitewashed houses are everywhere, but we didn’t see a single high rise. Beaches are fewer but offer golden sands and surfing.
  4. 4. Dubbed a ‘micro-continent’, Gran Canaria is the island with the most micro climates. Expect everything from sweeping sand dunes to lush valleys; a 1/3 of the island is protected as a Biosphere Reserve. Tourist development is mostly confined to the warmer and sunnier south; head to the cooler north for dramatic cliffs and mountains. There’s diving, hiking, and the best beaches are found on the flatter east coast.
  5. 5. Head to the most north-westerly island, La Palma, the least developed and most scenic in the archipelago. There’s a premier observatory at its summit, much of the terrain is National Park, it is still geologically active, and it has the most diverse plant life, including lots of pine forest. The wild black-sand beaches contrast with pastel-coloured colonial villages. Kids will be fascinated by the water tunnels (minas galerias) which transport water collected by condensation at altitude to the villages and plantations below.
  6. 6. Known as the island of eternal spring, Fuerteventura, just like the rest of the Canary Islands, is a favorite among travelers. Positioned southwest of Lanzarote and east of Gran Canaria, the second largest among the group, boasts of the best and the most extensive white sand beaches and the most playful Atlantic waves. With tourism at the forefront of its economic growth, the island has gradually seen transformations of some of its sleepy seaside suburbs into bustling resort towns. But what sets it apart from its neighboring islands is the number of quiet and unspoiled traditional villages where time seems to stand still.
  7. 7. Known as “Isla Magica,” La Gomera lives up to its moniker and continue to enchant visitors with its natural wonders and perpetual summer-like weather. It is the second smallest of the Canary Islands cradling lush ancient forests, traditional villages, and unique culture. An unspoiled land, so beautiful and captivating, it’s no wonder those who’ve visited promise to return or stay a while longer.
  8. 8. El Hierro, the smallest and wildest of the Canary Islands, is the least tourist congested island in the archipelago. Its location on the westernmost part of Europe made people in the ancient times believe that it was the edge of the Earth. Today, with the perfect blend of ever- changing terrain, rich cultural heritages, and historic villages, the explicit edge-of- the-world feel still hangs in the air.

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