Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.
Flowing through the Indian
land – Kawa in India
- Kavitha Murthi
What I intend to do in the next 10-
15 minutes?
• Gist about OT in India
• Need for conceptual models
• Use of models in I...
Indian healthcare practice (Karthik 2011, Uplekar 2000)
• Privatization of healthcare in India
• OT was first introduced i...
Current stance of OT in Indian ethos
• OT is yet to make a national mark in Indian allied health
system (Karthik 2011)
• 5...
Need for conceptual models in OT practice
• OT built around –’occupation’
• Professional role blurring
(Wilding and Whitef...
Factors involved in the choice and use
of theoretical models
• Education
• Perceived utility in work ethos
• Therapists’ p...
Culture
• Unique and personal (Iwama 2006)
• Impact of culture upon disability (AlBusaidy and Borthwick 2012)
Difference between Western and Eastern
(Indian) Values (Iwama 2006, Hammell 2009, Turpin and Iwama 2011)
Western Values
1....
Influence of culture on conceptual models
(Iwama 2005, Hammell 2011)
• Direct transportation of western philosophies can b...
Conclusion (Turpin and Iwama 2011)
• Conceptual models to guide practice
• Uniqueness of the profession maintained
• Reali...
References
• AlBusaidy, N.S.M. and Borthwick, A. 2012. Occupational Therapy in
Oman: The Impact of Cultural Dissonance. Oc...
• Iwama, M. K. 2005. Situated meaning: an issue of culture, inclusion,
and occupational therapy. In: Kronenberg, F., Algad...
• Shetty, R. (2011). State of the Journal: A Five year review of Indian
Journal of Occupational Therapy. Indian Journal of...
Próxima SlideShare
Cargando en…5
×

Flowing through the Indian land- Kawa in India!

Kawa model in the Indian context, Western and Eastern values

  • Sé el primero en comentar

Flowing through the Indian land- Kawa in India!

  1. 1. Flowing through the Indian land – Kawa in India - Kavitha Murthi
  2. 2. What I intend to do in the next 10- 15 minutes? • Gist about OT in India • Need for conceptual models • Use of models in Indian practice • Culture and conceptual models • My experience of using Kawa model in India
  3. 3. Indian healthcare practice (Karthik 2011, Uplekar 2000) • Privatization of healthcare in India • OT was first introduced in 1952 by Kamala V Nimkar • Growing demand helped proliferation of OT within prominent branches of allied healthcare like mental health, paediatrics, neurology, cardiology, orthopaedics etc.
  4. 4. Current stance of OT in Indian ethos • OT is yet to make a national mark in Indian allied health system (Karthik 2011) • 57% studies focus on interventional effectiveness (Shetty 2011) BUT • No focus on understanding underpinning rationale (Shetty 2011, Murthi 2013)
  5. 5. Need for conceptual models in OT practice • OT built around –’occupation’ • Professional role blurring (Wilding and Whiteford 2007) • Profession reduced to a technicality • OTs termed as ‘gap-fillers’ (Fortune 2000)
  6. 6. Factors involved in the choice and use of theoretical models • Education • Perceived utility in work ethos • Therapists’ perspectives regarding models
  7. 7. Culture • Unique and personal (Iwama 2006) • Impact of culture upon disability (AlBusaidy and Borthwick 2012)
  8. 8. Difference between Western and Eastern (Indian) Values (Iwama 2006, Hammell 2009, Turpin and Iwama 2011) Western Values 1. Autonomy and independence 2. Mastery over surrounding environment 3. Client – centred practice 4. Occupational engagement 5. Classification of occupation into self-care, productivity and leisure Eastern Values 1. Interdependence and harmony 2. Stable relation with the environment 3. Family and society centred practice. 4. Occupational disengagement 5. Classification of occupation into self-care, productivity and leisure is over simplistic
  9. 9. Influence of culture on conceptual models (Iwama 2005, Hammell 2011) • Direct transportation of western philosophies can be catastrophic • Limited adaptability of conceptual models from one culture to another • Creates confusion, disengagement, dissatisfaction, coercion, alienation
  10. 10. Conclusion (Turpin and Iwama 2011) • Conceptual models to guide practice • Uniqueness of the profession maintained • Realise the dangers in the ‘one size fits all’ technique • Provide service that is service user centred and something that they understand, cherish and participate in
  11. 11. References • AlBusaidy, N.S.M. and Borthwick, A. 2012. Occupational Therapy in Oman: The Impact of Cultural Dissonance. Occupational Therapy International. • Fortune, T. 2000. Occupational therapists: Is our therapy truly occupational or are we merely filling gaps? British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63, 225–230. • Hammel, K.W. 2009. Sacred texts: A sceptical exploration of the assumptions underpinning theories of occupation. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76 (1) February, pp. 6 – 13. • Hammell, K.W.2011. Resisting theoretical imperialism in the disciplines of occupational science and occupational therapy. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 74(1), pp. 27-33.
  12. 12. • Iwama, M. K. 2005. Situated meaning: an issue of culture, inclusion, and occupational therapy. In: Kronenberg, F., Algado, S. S. and Pollard, N. eds. Occupational therapy without borders: learning from the spirit of survivors. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, pp.127-139. • Iwama, M. K, 2006. The Kawa Model: Culturally relevant Occupational Therapy. Churchill Livingstone. Edinburgh • Iwama, M., and Turpin, M.K 2011. Using Occupational Therapy Models in Practice: a field guide. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. • Karthik, M. 2011. Introduction to Occupational therapy and Occupational Therapy Marketing. New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers. • Murthi, K. 2013. Exploring Indian occupational therapists’ perspectives regarding use of conceptual models to guide occupational therapy practice in India. MSC thesis, Queen Margaret University.
  13. 13. • Shetty, R. (2011). State of the Journal: A Five year review of Indian Journal of Occupational Therapy. Indian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 43(2), pp. 10 – 15. • Uplekar, M.W. 2000. Private Health Care. Social Science and Medicine, [online] 51(6), pp. 897- 904. Available at: http://ac.els- cdn.com/S0277953600000691/1-s2.0-S0277953600000691- main.pdf?_tid=4690bba0-b105-11e2-b887- 00000aab0f6c&acdnat=1367264879_14822e91e7a7e8532ba87eb0 5c0d7bec [Accessed October 23 2012]. • Wilding C.and Whiteford G.2008. Language, identity and representation: occupation and occupational therapy in acute settings. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 55(3), 180-87.

×