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Integrative
Teaching
Strategies
(ITS)
Krizzie Ortega Silverio Pilo
May-an Pingaping Rudelyn Sabado
Special Topics
Benguet ...
Fragmented Teaching
This is what happens when we study just
a part of reality like when we put a wall
to shut science from...
Values and
other subjects
History and
Literature
Science and
Math
Reading and
Math
India’s Caste System and Hymn
of Creati...
Integrative Teaching Strategies (ITS)
A. Integrate – “To put things together”
• The lesson and real life situation.
• The ...
We teach values, health, grammar and
math when we teach science. We teach
science, values and math when we teach
grammar.
...
This was popularized by the advocates
of Values Clarification like Charles
Merill. The proponents of this
integrated teach...
Values
Concepts
Facts
The knowledge
acquired are
related to the
students’ life.
The facts a
reviewed and
organized into
co...
The Little Prince meets the Fox
A. Facts - Students read the excerpt `The Little
Prince meets the Fox`
B. Concepts - Stude...
Objectives of Integrative
Teaching Strategies
1) To foster security and satisfaction.
2) To promote cooperative learning.
...
Principles Underlying the
Planning for Integrative
Teaching Strategies
1) The development of the whole
personality of the ...
4) Learning should be characterized by
group planning, group work, and
group assessment.
5) Teaching-learning activities s...
Kinds of Work Units or
Integrative Activities in the
Classroom
 In the integrative classroom, the
subject matter is divid...
UNIT
An organization of
activities or experiences
around a purpose or a
problem.
It signifies wholeness,
oneness or unity.
The Three Kinds of
Units of Work
1. Subject Matter Units – the units are
organized round the usual textbook chapters
or to...
Characteristics of the
learning experiences for
meaningful integrative
activities
1. Problem-based
2. Contextualized learn...
Three Modes of Integrative
Teaching Strategies
1. Thematic Teaching
2. Content-based Instruction
3. Focusing Inquiry
THEMATIC TEACHING
• Linking of content and process from a
variety of disciplines.
• Provides coherence among the
activitie...
Integrated Unit Design
1. Decide on a unit theme that will allow all group
members to enter to the integration process.
2....
5. Brainstorm “essential questions” to facilitate
study toward the essential understanding.
6. List processed (complex per...
8. Write the culminating performance to show
the depth of learning.
9. Design the scoring guide (rubric-criteria and
stand...
FOCUSING INQUIRY
Inquiry is the dynamic process of being open to
wonder and puzzlements and coming to know and
understand ...
FOCUSING INQUIRY
Student-centered and teacher-guided
instructional approach that engages students in
investigating real w...
INQUIRY PROCESS
What kinds of questions work best?
When helping students to pose open-ended
questions for inquiry, teachers should lead s...
Teaching Strategies for
Inquiry Process
Low Level Process
• RECALL
• OBSERVE
• COMPARE/CONTRAST
• CLASSIFY
• DEFINE
• INTE...
CONTENT-BASED
INSTRUCTION (CBI)
Integration of content learning language
teaching aims.
It is centered on the academic n...
Content-based instruction emphasizes
a connection to real life, real world skills
(Curtain, 1995); in content-based classe...
CBI is an approach to language instruction
that integrates the presentation of topics or
tasks from subject matter classes...
Other forms of integrative
strategy:
1. Lecture-Discussion
It uses the “Three Pronged Strategy” which
includes careful or...
2. Demonstration-Lecture Method
After showing an actual thing that represents
the subject matter, the teacher may now
pro...
 Uses films, tapes, slides and televisions and
after that, the discussion will follow.
3. Film showing-Discussion
4. Reporting-Discussion
After a student makes a reports, the class can
actively engage in an interesting discussion of
th...
5. Inductive-Deductive Technique
 Teaching from the most specific to most
complex subject matter and then letting the
stu...
6. Directed-Transductive
Convergent thinking is
emphasized in this
strategy which is highly
structured in moving
students...
Benefits
1) Help alleviate fragmentation of
learning and isolated skill
instruction.
2) Train students to think and reason...
Educational implications:
 Pre-service teachers are expected to
demonstrate and practice the
professional and ethical req...
 Teachers must try to be sensitive in the
interest, needs and experiences of the
students in the class that the learning
...
Lee Flamand Study
Goals:
Integrative teaching is supposed to
allow students to learn how to approach a
problem as they mig...
Methods:
An Integrated curriculum
emphasizes projects rather than
individual, self-sufficient lessons.
Skills:
The point o...
Teacher Evaluation:
One of the primary values of
integrative teaching is that it allows
teachers to evaluate their student...
INTEGRATIVE TEACHING STRATEGY (Special Topics) - compiled by Krizzie Rapisura Ortega
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INTEGRATIVE TEACHING STRATEGY (Special Topics) - compiled by Krizzie Rapisura Ortega

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INTEGRATIVE TEACHING STRATEGY (ITS) ▬ Special Topics
Prepared by:
◘ ▬ ORTEGA, Krizzie R.
◘ ▬ PILO, Silverio
◘ ▬ PINGAPING, May-an
◘ ▬ SABADO, Rudelyn

BSE IV A - English
(2015)

Publicado en: Educación
  • Sé el primero en comentar

INTEGRATIVE TEACHING STRATEGY (Special Topics) - compiled by Krizzie Rapisura Ortega

  1. 1. Integrative Teaching Strategies (ITS) Krizzie Ortega Silverio Pilo May-an Pingaping Rudelyn Sabado Special Topics Benguet State University College of Teacher Education
  2. 2. Fragmented Teaching This is what happens when we study just a part of reality like when we put a wall to shut science from math, language from values, music from civics. This is what we do when we teach the subjects in isolation from one another.
  3. 3. Values and other subjects History and Literature Science and Math Reading and Math India’s Caste System and Hymn of Creation “What is the angle of elevation or velocity or the acceleration if….” Word Problems; “Tom is 12 years old greater than Jerry” “Do I need that in my life? Will I use or apply that in real life?” I don’t know! Malay ko!
  4. 4. Integrative Teaching Strategies (ITS) A. Integrate – “To put things together” • The lesson and real life situation. • The lesson and a lesson from other subjects. • The lesson and meaningful activities. • The lesson and their intelligences and learning styles. B. It paves the way to connecting what is learned in school to real life world rather than isolated facts and information.
  5. 5. We teach values, health, grammar and math when we teach science. We teach science, values and math when we teach grammar. After all these subjects are parts and parcels of life which is the only true curriculum.
  6. 6. This was popularized by the advocates of Values Clarification like Charles Merill. The proponents of this integrated teaching strategy asserts that the teaching – learning process should touch the facts – level, the concept – level and the values –level.
  7. 7. Values Concepts Facts The knowledge acquired are related to the students’ life. The facts a reviewed and organized into concepts (relationship of facts). The students learn isolated facts
  8. 8. The Little Prince meets the Fox A. Facts - Students read the excerpt `The Little Prince meets the Fox` B. Concepts - Students answer these questions: 1. What happens with the little prince? 2. Why did he leave the fox? 3. How did the little prince tame the fox? C. Values – Students relate the lesson they derived from the story to a real life situation.
  9. 9. Objectives of Integrative Teaching Strategies 1) To foster security and satisfaction. 2) To promote cooperative learning. 3) To help develop sense of values. 4) To help develop self-direction. 5) To foster creativity. 6) To provide opportunities for social action. 7) To help evaluate learning.
  10. 10. Principles Underlying the Planning for Integrative Teaching Strategies 1) The development of the whole personality of the learner is more important than the subject matter. 2) Long rage plans and large units should be prepared to daily and isolated tasks. 3) Learning activities should be recognized around real-life problems of the pupils, their needs and interests.
  11. 11. 4) Learning should be characterized by group planning, group work, and group assessment. 5) Teaching-learning activities should follow democratic procedures. 6) Individual differences should be provided for by a wide variety of learning and experiences. 7) The atmosphere of the classroom should be permissive and happy.
  12. 12. Kinds of Work Units or Integrative Activities in the Classroom  In the integrative classroom, the subject matter is divided into meaningful learning experiences which are unified around a certain core or theme for which the child has a felt need. This organized learning experiences are called units.
  13. 13. UNIT An organization of activities or experiences around a purpose or a problem. It signifies wholeness, oneness or unity.
  14. 14. The Three Kinds of Units of Work 1. Subject Matter Units – the units are organized round the usual textbook chapters or topics or around major generalization and principles. 2. Center of Interests Units – the units based on the interest of pupils, their felt needs, their dominant purpose or a combination of these. 3. Integrative Experience Units – the units which aim at a learning product which is changed behavior and the adjustment of the individual (Lardizabal. 1995)
  15. 15. Characteristics of the learning experiences for meaningful integrative activities 1. Problem-based 2. Contextualized learner’s comprehension and scope of experience 3. Continuous development 4. Cooperatively planned by teachers and students. (Lardizabal, 1995)
  16. 16. Three Modes of Integrative Teaching Strategies 1. Thematic Teaching 2. Content-based Instruction 3. Focusing Inquiry
  17. 17. THEMATIC TEACHING • Linking of content and process from a variety of disciplines. • Provides coherence among the activities.
  18. 18. Integrated Unit Design 1. Decide on a unit theme that will allow all group members to enter to the integration process. 2. Identify the major concept to serve as a suitable “Integrating lens” for the study. 3. Web the topics for the study, by subject or learning area, around the concept and the theme 4. Brainstorm some of the “essential understanding” (generalization) that would expect learners derive from the study.
  19. 19. 5. Brainstorm “essential questions” to facilitate study toward the essential understanding. 6. List processed (complex performance) and bullet key skills to be emphasized in a unit instruction and activities. 7. For each week and discipline in the unit, write instructional activities to engage learners with essential questions and processes.
  20. 20. 8. Write the culminating performance to show the depth of learning. 9. Design the scoring guide (rubric-criteria and standard) to assess the performance task. Additional types of assessment may be used to measure progress throughout the unit.
  21. 21. FOCUSING INQUIRY Inquiry is the dynamic process of being open to wonder and puzzlements and coming to know and understand the world. (Galileo Educational Network, 2004) Inquiry-based learning is a process where students are involved in their learning, formulate questions, investigate widely and then build new understandings, meanings and knowledge.
  22. 22. FOCUSING INQUIRY Student-centered and teacher-guided instructional approach that engages students in investigating real world questions. Students acquire and analyze information, develop and support propositions, provide solutions and design technology and art products that demonstrate their thinking and make their learning visible.
  23. 23. INQUIRY PROCESS
  24. 24. What kinds of questions work best? When helping students to pose open-ended questions for inquiry, teachers should lead student thinking to questions that are: Interesting to the student Answerable, but neither a simple fact answer nor a value judgment Not personal in nature Objective
  25. 25. Teaching Strategies for Inquiry Process Low Level Process • RECALL • OBSERVE • COMPARE/CONTRAST • CLASSIFY • DEFINE • INTERPRET • GENERALIZE High Level Process • • INFER • HYPOTHESIZE • PREDICT • ANALYZE • SYNTHESIZE • EVALUATE
  26. 26. CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION (CBI) Integration of content learning language teaching aims. It is centered on the academic needs and interest of learners, and crosses the barrier between the language and subject matter courses. (Zulueta, 2006)
  27. 27. Content-based instruction emphasizes a connection to real life, real world skills (Curtain, 1995); in content-based classes, students have more opportunities to use the content knowledge and expertise they bring to class (they activate their prior knowledge, which leads to increased learning of language and content material).
  28. 28. CBI is an approach to language instruction that integrates the presentation of topics or tasks from subject matter classes (e.g., math, social studies) (Crandall & Tucker, 1990, p. 187). Example • English and Science • Math and Civics • English and History • Science and Math • Health and Language
  29. 29. Other forms of integrative strategy: 1. Lecture-Discussion It uses the “Three Pronged Strategy” which includes careful organization of the course material, student interaction in lecture, and discussion section activities.
  30. 30. 2. Demonstration-Lecture Method After showing an actual thing that represents the subject matter, the teacher may now proceed to his lecture in order to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the procedure or process presented.
  31. 31.  Uses films, tapes, slides and televisions and after that, the discussion will follow. 3. Film showing-Discussion
  32. 32. 4. Reporting-Discussion After a student makes a reports, the class can actively engage in an interesting discussion of the various ideas that the student shared with his classmates. The teacher at this point can enliven the session by asking some questions and can enrich it, too, by adding relevant and clarifying ideas.
  33. 33. 5. Inductive-Deductive Technique  Teaching from the most specific to most complex subject matter and then letting the students derive their own specific understanding about the topic.
  34. 34. 6. Directed-Transductive Convergent thinking is emphasized in this strategy which is highly structured in moving students from particular to particular. It is used in teaching specific motor skills, word association skills, map skills, and the like. Main steps are: 1. Direct students attention to the items to be associated or related. 2. Provide opportunities for practice. 3. Provide assistance to students who need it. 4. Provide for application in other situations.
  35. 35. Benefits 1) Help alleviate fragmentation of learning and isolated skill instruction. 2) Train students to think and reason at a higher level (critical thinking). 3) Provide instruction in a more relevant and interesting to the students.
  36. 36. Educational implications:  Pre-service teachers are expected to demonstrate and practice the professional and ethical requirements of the teaching profession.  Teachers are guided on how to modify, create, innovate and integrate best classroom practices that match exactly to the learning styles and multiple intelligences the pupils/students have.
  37. 37.  Teachers must try to be sensitive in the interest, needs and experiences of the students in the class that the learning episode is realistic and significant.  In the K to 12 Basic Education Program, pre-service teachers will be exposed will be exposed to various comprehensive and best classroom practices.
  38. 38. Lee Flamand Study Goals: Integrative teaching is supposed to allow students to learn how to approach a problem as they might have to in the real world and getting them to consider a single issue from different angles.
  39. 39. Methods: An Integrated curriculum emphasizes projects rather than individual, self-sufficient lessons. Skills: The point of developing and implementing an integrative curriculum is to foster higher-ordered thinking skills.
  40. 40. Teacher Evaluation: One of the primary values of integrative teaching is that it allows teachers to evaluate their students by means other than standardized testing School To Work: One of the major strengths of the integrative curriculum approach is that it prepares students to think about and struggle with a long-term project the way people in the workplace often have to think about their own projects.

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