Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Se está descargando tu SlideShare. ×

Corporate Onboarding

Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio
Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING




                      Best Practices in Onboarding

                       ...
Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING


        First impressions go a long way to making an impact, and joining a ne...
Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING


         DO NOT RUN (2008) also found that 86% of new hires decide to stay wi...
Anuncio
Anuncio
Anuncio

Eche un vistazo a continuación

1 de 16 Anuncio

Corporate Onboarding

Descargar para leer sin conexión

This paper is a result of a course in Organizational Leadership and answers the question, "What makes an effective onboarding program for employees, executive managers and CEOs?". It pulls together best practices from a number of resources, and provides insight into elements that will improve employee retention and productivity by fostering a rapid acclimation into the corporate culture.

This paper is a result of a course in Organizational Leadership and answers the question, "What makes an effective onboarding program for employees, executive managers and CEOs?". It pulls together best practices from a number of resources, and provides insight into elements that will improve employee retention and productivity by fostering a rapid acclimation into the corporate culture.

Anuncio
Anuncio

Más Contenido Relacionado

Presentaciones para usted (20)

Anuncio

Similares a Corporate Onboarding (20)

Más reciente (20)

Anuncio

Corporate Onboarding

  1. 1. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING Best Practices in Onboarding Lisa Parrott Argosy University/Seattle Campus March, 2013
  2. 2. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING First impressions go a long way to making an impact, and joining a new company is no different. Building an effective onboarding program is a challenge that organizations often take for granted. Most individuals have probably experienced the pain and boredom of spending hours filling out paperwork on their first day or two of joining a new company. Often this monotonous work is essential, but lacking in providing a welcoming environment for the new employee. This task may be augmented by an online website, a meeting with their boss and possibly a few hours of group training, which still leaves the individual wanting. A large number of organizations regard the first few days for a new hire as essential for meeting legal and policy requirements, rather than taking the opportunity to connect and build a lasting relationship to foster employee retention and loyalty. Research suggests thatpoor onboarding experiences can lead to 4% of new hires failing to return the next day and dissatisfaction in nearly one third of executives.“The thing retailers need to remember is first impressions are lasting and the fastest, least expensive way to reduce costly employee turnover is to make more favorable first impression than missteps during onboarding” (Lofstock, 2008, p. 51). Van Dam (2007) argues that employee turnover can cost companies 30 to 50 percent of their first year pay, with estimates reaching up to 100%. An article in Training Magazine, titled „DO NOT RUN‟ (2008) finds that 71% of their best in class companies provide an onboarding strategy to retain new employees, with 100% of their companies seeing improved retention over the previous year. “Onboarding is simply the process of helping a new employee become a successful part of an organization” (Allen, 2012, p. 83).
  3. 3. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING DO NOT RUN (2008) also found that 86% of new hires decide to stay with a company within the first six months of employment. This suggests the need to provide a well-rounded onboarding program beyond the paperwork and benefits requirement, and also lasting well into the first year of employment. In addition, the needs of younger generations are pushing companies to include online programs that fit the millennial culture. Changes in technology have allowed companies to become geographically diverse requiring the need for methods of onboarding that previously were not an option. Because of this, companies can automate their onboarding process, which provides an additional cost savings of $400 to $800 per new hire by eliminating supplies, man-hours and increasing productivity. Another aspect of cost savings includes requiring direct deposit for all employees. Bradt (2010) suggests that onboarding is a form of transformational leadership and employers should consider it “an act of shared leadership” (p. 5). Taking this approach allows the company to incorporate the values and culture the employee brings to the organization while sharing theirs with the new hire. The company must also embody this belief in their hiring process and provide the time, job expectations and resources necessary to make employees feel welcomed. It is essential for the hiring manager to recognize the need for a successful onboarding program, and prioritize the process above daily work requirements, as it can increase the time a new employee becomes productive by up to four weeks. For this reason, in order to create an effective onboarding strategy, training for hiring managers is the first step before bringing a new hire into the organization. Companies must show the dedication they have to making a positive and lasting first impression that reduces the potential for attrition and creates a supportive environment for all new employees. This
  4. 4. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING training should highlight the savings associated with retention and increased productivity from employees who acclimate quicker to the culture and job requirements. Hiring managers need to know how they play a pivotal part in defining the needs of the employee, their expectations for first year achievements and how they must co-develop the plan for the employee to reach these goals (Bradt, 2010). Employee dissatisfaction can occur within the first six month (van Dam, 2007), often stemming from performing a role they did not interview for, not being given the tools to succeed and failing to connect with their hiring manager.The hiring manager is responsible for a number of steps in the onboarding process, including setting up everything the new hire needs to start on the first day. This can range from finding a workspace, computer, phone and chair to also obtaining the login and password. They will also need to send out the communication to the organization about the new hire welcoming them aboard. The hiring manager will become responsible for following up with the new hire at routine intervals to obtain feedback on the onboarding process, growth potential and re-evaluate the employee plan to ensure the individual is on track to meet their first year goals. After training the hiring manager on their requirements in the onboarding process, the next step involves the recruiting team. During engagements with potential new employees, they must show their respect for the candidate‟s time and foster the organization‟s values. This will help reinforce the fit for the individual into the company. For managers, senior executives and Company Executive Officer‟s (CEOs), it is essential for the recruiting process to include an opportunity for the individual to engage in an information interview with a member of the organization that is not in the hiring process.
  5. 5. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING This will provide an unbiased opportunity for them to ask difficult questions about the culture of the company within impacting their hiring process. Upon hiring a new employee, the company should begin the formal onboarding process by emailing a welcome packet of information. Keep in mind; this packet should embody the values and culture of the organization by fostering a sense of inclusion and what to really expect as a new member of the company. If fun is a value for the organization then the onboarding process should highlight this trait (Amazon has a „Peculiar‟ quiz to get new hires thinking about their culture and what it really means). Things to include: a video from the CEO introducing them to the company culture, values and fun tidbits that characterize the organization using real examples a checklist of steps to complete and the expected timeframe for accomplishment the link, login and password to the company internal employee system, where they can fill out necessary paperwork (like I-9) and update their personal information a link to the company onboarding page, with tabs for benefits information, videos on a day in the life of, fun quizzes, knowledge tests (like emotional intelligence), location specific information (like restaurants, schools, real estate agents for those who will be moving), feedback links, visual tours of the organization, employee resource group links, what to expect on day one and week one articles and policies (such as dress code, attendance, how to use sick leave and vacation time, etc.) an acronym list, and new hire group meeting times (this can be done in person or virtually) their employee page, where they can add facts about themselves and upload a picture name and contact information for their hiring manager, mentor and peer buddy who will help them adjust to the organization date and time for orientation and what to expect on their first day as well as who to contact for any questions (a mentor or peer buddy should join them upon arrival to orientation) new employee e-book that can be downloaded to their tablet, phone or other device (Allen, 2012)
  6. 6. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING The first day for new employees should be standardized into an orientation that is upbeat, interactive and goes beyond the paperwork requirement. The primary focus should be on company culture, values and goals (Arnold, 2010). If the company is small and only a couple of employees start at the same time, the orientation can be personalized and include an introduction to key personnel on the first day. For larger organizations with multiple new hires, they can hold routine scripted orientation groups. Regardless of size, the orientation should answer basic questions and provide a chance for employees to ask questions, get a feel for the organization, feel welcomed and provide feedback about their experience. A fun way to bring individuals up to speed is to provide a game or quiz with real prices featuring questions about the culture of the organization. All employees should experience the orientation process, regardless of title within the organization. This is a chance for them to bond with others on a personal level, and the orientation process should include icebreakers for individuals to learn a little about each other. This is also the day when a new hire will be meeting their mentor, peer buddy and hiring manager for lunch or coffee (providing a relaxing social environment). A new employee will often be overwhelmed at the start, so information should be provided in small doses and reinforced on the onboarding website. The onboarding page should provide a list of topics to review online depending on their time with the organization. At the end of the day, the hiring manager will seek feedback from the new hire through the employee page. This will document their impression and provide ideas for improvement going forward. It is essential the hiring manager reviews this feedback and provides a response to the new hire before the next feedback session. In doing so this will instill trust and commitment to the employee‟s opinion and insight.
  7. 7. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING The first week at a new company should be accompanied by an onboarding training (Launch) plan, co-created by the hiring manager and new employee. In this Launch Plan, the manager establishes the job description, expectations, first year goals, training requirements, weekly one on one meeting schedule, and list of key stakeholders the new hire should meet with to discuss specific topics. They will also be expected to meet with their mentor the first week to set up a similar plan for personal growth and goals. The new employee will also engage in job shadowing with their peer buddy (either in person or an online format), knowledge tests, and job specific training. By using the employee page, hiring managers can measure retention, individual training accomplishment and performance reviews.The end of this week should also be followed up with a request for feedback through the employee page. Again, the hiring manager will review and respond to the employees input. At lease once a month, all new employees will attend an onboarding chat session, either virtually or in person (depending on the organization). An HR manager who will encourage them to speak openly about their experience and recommended improvements will facilitate the meeting. New hires will also begin attending development classes within the organization. This will continue throughout their tenure, to keep them in touch with the onboarding process during the first year (Short, 2011), and then beyond as it grows into the employee development phase. These classes will include topics like team leadership, leadership styles, conflict management, personality styles and emotional intelligence. It is essential to continue engaging with employees on a routine basis their first year to foster their personal growth and commitment to the organization. Individuals determine whether or not they will stay within the first six months, and so hiring managers must
  8. 8. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING continue to recognize milestones, discuss progress and seek feedback. By the third month the employee should be encouraged to engage with employee resource groups and organizations that can help build their sense of community. Every three months the hiring manager and HR team will send out feedback surveys requesting both quantitative and qualitative data around the onboarding program. Employees struggling to become autonomous at the third month may also need to be evaluated in regards to their position fit, and encouraged to relocate if not meshing with the hiring manager or when their skills are better suited in another role. This will encourage retention and lower onboarding costs through reassignment as opposed to hiring two new employees. Executives and managers should complete these onboarding steps, and also include a few targeting the additional role they fulfill in the organization. Eder Van-Hook (2011) argues that as many as 40% of senior leadership leaves the organization within 18 months. This number is compounded by the cost associated with attrition (30-50% according to van Dam, 2007), and as a result, failing to retain executive talent can begin to add up fast. A key to managers acclimating to an organization starts with how they approach their role and the steps they can take to fit in. Listening is a critical factor to joining a new company in the middle to senior leadership roles, and individuals may require a mentor who can guide them on using “I” less during their first months and asking opening ended questions to engage employees. Before turning a new manager or executive loose within the organization they first need to spend time sharing their leadership philosophy and learning more about that of the company. For this reason, after completing the first day orientation, new managers are then assigned to take part in a leadership-training day, which begins first with an evaluation and
  9. 9. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING definition of their leadership philosophy that can be shared with their direct reports. They will then engage in classes about leadership styles, approaches, team building and dealing with conflict. This will allow HR managers to observe the new leader and identify strengths and areas of improvement that can then be acted upon through mentor meetings. Mentor meetings for new executives provide them a chance to unload the key items learned by listening the first month. It will also establish a relationship when one can set a plan to work on self-improvement. At the six-month mark, the manager meets with their hiring manager and mentor for a 360-degree feedback session, that highlights the accomplishments, path toward completing first year goals and areas for continued improvement. The first week for a new executive will also involve observing a turnover video (when possible) from the prior individual in their role. When this is not a viable option, a senior coach will be assigned to interview peers, managers and key stakeholders to develop a guide that will help facilitate their introduction to the new position (Johnson, 2006). The intent of this turnover process is to understand the department; it‟s progress on key projects, areas of improvement and to establish a sense of continuity for personnel and their future within the company. In many cases employees feel as if they have to restart their progress with a new manager, or may be upset about being passed over the promotion. This turnover will also go hand in hand with meetings for direct reports to „interview‟ the new manager on their leadership philosophy, work style and expectations for the department. In the first month the senior leader will also begin assessing the strength of their team and direct reports by observing their performance as a cohesive group. The manager will be examining the ability of the group in start up mode with a new manager, how it
  10. 10. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING begins to turnaround and performing to expectations, determining if it requires realignment (is there a bad apple bringing the team down?) and finally observing if it can sustain success (Derven, 2008). Senior executives are not the only new hires that can face uncertainty and a feeling of being unwelcome in an organization. For this reason, the board must be involved when CEOs are onboarding within a company. It is essential for them to provide the personal introductions to key stakeholders in order to provide legitimacy and also spend time with the new CEO to familiarize them with the organization and its peculiarities. This can be done in conjunction with an outgoing CEO where permissible. Someone from the board or another CEO recommended by the board should be appointed as the mentor for the new CEO to succeed. A board can also provide significant assistance by hiring an outside consultant to support the CEO‟s transition. The board must also foster a learning and development environment for the CEO, by establishing director level education outside the organization to help foster new and creative ideas for the company. To ensure the CEO has sufficient support from within, they should be tasked to set up a „kitchen cabinet‟ of senior leadership (Eder Van-Hook, 2011) from each division to act as an advocate (Allen, 2012). And finally the staff must provide an introduction meeting to the organization within the first few weeks to familiarize the CEO with staff biographies, company financials, annual goals and organizational challenges each department would like to see addressed in the upcoming year. This can also be a chance for the staff to reinforce their support for each other. The CEO will also be evaluating their team and direct reports for the same criteria as the executive leadership.
  11. 11. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING The investment from a well established and thought out onboarding program is not seen up front, but is rather the result of increased employee productivity, high employee satisfaction and retention. The cost savings can be astronomical as previously mentioned, but the impact employee turnover has on morale is not often quantified. It is also impossible to measure the effect employee dissatisfaction has on recruiting efforts, as it is difficult to know who refused to consider a company based on this area alone. Websites like Glassdoor are providing potential employees the chance to evaluate a company online before making the decision to apply. By developing a program that meets the needs of all parties concerned and provides numerous inclusive opportunities for the new hire, any company can ensure they bring employees up to speed quickly and with regard for development and future growth within the organization. Onboarding is required for companies of all sizes and employees at all levels and locations. Technology can deliver this information through a wide variety of platforms, include online websites, in person orientation and Skype chat sessions. Failing to create an effective onboarding program that seeks feedback from its users is akin to throwing away funds in a recruiting, training and attrition cycle. Companies that wish to be successful over the long run will implement a formal onboarding program that meets the demands of their future employees.
  12. 12. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING 5 Things all Onboarding Programs must provide for new hires: 1. A guide into the nuances of the organization, its culture and values; an explanation of the hiring managers leadership style and who the key relationships are for the employee to be successful 2. Basic administrative needs – policies, benefits and paperwork 3. A personal connection to the company for the employee (welcome aboard emails, signs, mentors and or peer buddy) 4. Acknowledgement of their worth and value to the company (from the CEO to the hiring manager and recruiter); automated milestone emails to employees and their hiring manager 5. General „how to‟ perform their job and grow within the organization; also how to navigate the decision making process to get things done (is it very autonomous or micromanaged?) 5 Additional Steps for an Executive and Management Onboarding Program: 1. Participate in a leadership training day which includes an evaluation, and classes on understanding leadership styles, approaches, team building and dealing with conflict 2. Spend the first month engaged in active listening and weekly mentor meeting „downloads‟ which also identify areas of strengths and areas of improvement; at month 6 participate with hiring manager and mentor in a 360 degree review (Johnson, 2006) 3. When possible, review the turnover video from the previous individual in the role to cover their take on the department, it‟s progress during their term, areas of improvement and continuity on personnel and their future within the company (in many cases a manager will be working with an employee for promotion and this is lost when a new manager arrives; when this is not possible, a coach is assigned to interviews peers, managers, and key stakeholders to develop a guide for navigating their new position in the first 90 days (Johnson, 2006) 4. Establish meetings with direct reports facilitated by HR managers where the employees „interview‟ the new manager 5. Assess their teams and direct reports - start up mode, turnaround, realignment and sustaining success (Derven, 2008) 5 Additional Steps for a CEO Onboarding Program: 1. Involve the board for personal introductionsto key stakeholders and company peculiarities in order to provide legitimacy (can also be done through a turnover with the old CEO when possible)
  13. 13. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING 2. Provide a transition consultant outside the organization who can provide unbiased assistance 3. Establish director education outside the organization that are in line with the values and needs of the company 4. Create a „kitchen cabinet‟ of senior leaders in each division who will provide support in navigating the company landscape (Eder Van-Hook, 2011) and act as an advocate (Allen, 2012) 5. Hold an introduction to the organization meeting with staff biographies, company financials, annual goals and challenges the staff would like to see the CEO address in the upcoming year
  14. 14. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING Onboarding Checklist for Hiring Managers _____ Attend onboard training for new hires _____ Follow up with new hire _____ Define job responsibilities, goals and expectations _____ Send out welcome email to employees _____ Set up phone and office space _____ Obtain login and password _____ Seek feedback at end of day one, week one, month one and every three months thereafter for onboarding and provide response to employee before next feedback opportunity on actionable items Onboarding Checklist for All New Hires _____ Send intro email including: a video from the CEO introducing them to the company culture, values and fun tidbits that characterize the organization using real examples a checklist of steps to complete and the expected timeframe for accomplishment the link, login and password to the company internal employee system, where they can fill out necessary paperwork (like I-9) and update their personal information a link to the company onboarding page, with tabs for benefits information, videos on a day in the life of, fun quizzes, knowledge tests (like emotional intelligence), location specific information (like restaurants, schools, real estate agents for those who will be moving), feedback links, visual tours of the organization, employee resource group links, what to expect on day one and week one articles and policies (such as dress code, attendance, how to use sick leave and vacation time, etc.) an acronym list, and new hire group meeting times (this can be done in person or virtually) their employee page, where they can add facts about themselves and upload a picture name and contact information for their hiring manager, mentor and peer buddy who will help them adjust to the organization date and time for orientation and what to expect on their first day as well as who to contact for any questions (a mentor or peer buddy should join them upon arrival to orientation)
  15. 15. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING new employee e-book that can be downloaded to their tablet, phone or other device (Allen, 2012) _____ Attend orientation on ______ _____ Complete feedback at end of first day, first week, first month and every three months thereafter _____ Meet with mentor, peer buddy and hiring manager _____ Work with hiring manager on Launch Plan _____ Attend monthly onboarding chat session _____ Attend monthly development class Additional Onboarding Checklist for Executives and Managers _____ Participate in the leadership training day _____ Weekly mentor meetings _____ Six month 360 degree review _____ Review turnover video or guide _____ Meeting with direct reports for interview _____ Assessteam and direct reports Additional Onboarding Checklist for CEOs _____ Meeting with key stakeholders _____ Work with transition consultant on a weekly basis _____ Begin director level education outside the organization _____ Create a „kitchen cabinet‟ of senior leaders in each division _____ Attend big picture organizational meeting from all divisions
  16. 16. Running Head: BEST PRACTICES IN ONBOARDING References Allen, K. (2012). "Only One Chance to Make a Good First Impression." Water Environment Federation Magazine.Vol 24, (1). p. 63-65. Arnold, J. (2010). “Ramping Up Onboarding” HR Magazine. May, p. 75-78. Bradt, G. (2010). “Onboarding: An Act of Transformational Leadership”. People & Strategy. Vol. 33 (2), p. 4-5. Derven, M. (2008). “Management Onboarding”.American Society for Training & Development. April, p. 48-52. "DO NOT RUN In on Onboarding." Trainingmag.com. May 2008. Eder-Van Hook, J. (2011). “Welcome Aboard”. Associations Now. April, p. 30 - 35. Johnson, L. (2006). “Rapid Onboarding at Capital One.” Harvard Business Review. September, p. 3-4. Lofstock, J. (2008). “Onboarding – the Key to Valued Employee Retention”. Convenience Store Decisions. October, p. 48-51 Savitt, M. (2011). "Effective Onboarding Leads to an Engaged Workforce". Trainingmag.com. July. Short, D. (2011).“Employee Onboarding”.Training.Vol 48 (4), p. 38-39. van Dam, N. (2007). “The Business Results of Strategic Onboarding”.Chief Learning Oficer. June, p. 18.

×