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Interact London 2015: Jane Frost CBE

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Placebo works...

Video: https://youtu.be/-IPif520i9o

Why does the consumer often seem to be left out of the design process?
Designers, whether engineers, architects, digital or other technical expert sometimes seem to be dedicated to processes, outputs and "stuff". Their language is inaccessible to consumers and user manuals and therefore, more often gobbledegook than not.

The reducing cost of failure in this digital age means that new brands die rapidly: compare the lifespan of mobile handset brands to many fast moving consumer goods.

We can all list examples of unworkable workspace, unreadable typefaces, un-navigable sites and yes, mobile surveys that can’t be filled in.

Why does this happen and what can Research contribute to bridge the gap?

We know that placebos work, so how should we design around the knowledge that emotional trust can be more important than “real” function?

From Maslow’s hierarchy to new theories of time elasticity, to the impact of understanding motivations on public policy, you really do need to be more curious about your consumer…

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Interact London 2015: Jane Frost CBE

  1. 1. The Legend of Albert Young 1 Jane Frost, CBE CEO of MRS Tuesday 20 October 2015
  2. 2. 2 Placebo
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  6. 6. V = F + E + P 6
  7. 7. F = E + P 7
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  11. 11. ATTITUDINAL SEGMENTATION WILLING ABLE SYSTEMIC AWARE PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS UNWILLING UNABLE FUNCTIONAL HELP UNWILLING UNAWARE WILLING 11
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  13. 13. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS 13
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