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Analysis Prioritisation Communication-Day Eleven (Final)

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Analysis Prioritisation Communication-Day Eleven (Final)

  1. 1. …to know your purpose is to know everything. life =
  2. 2. ∫life = death birth ∆ time happiness time
  3. 3. Prioritising our time The 30x rule Create a master list for daily, weekly, monthly & life goals Creating ‘Good enough’ goals (Warren Buffet’s 2 list strategy) Separate the ‘Urgent’ from the ‘Important’ tasks (Eisenhower Matrix) Ranking daily tasks (Ivy Lee Method) Separating similar tasks by ranking Setting a productive tone by ‘Eating the elephant’ Sunk Cost fallacy for time allocation Time Multiplier Model to prioritise Prioritising most urgent during peak productive hours
  4. 4. 30x Rule The 30x rule says you should spend 30x the amount of time training someone to do a task than it would take you to do the task yourself one time. For example, if a task takes you 5 minutes per day to complete, then the 30x rule suggests you could comfortably spend up to 150 minutes training someone to do that task. or You should personally spend 30x time training up for the task to implement it correctly.
  5. 5. 1.Capture all the things you need to “keep up with” in one place. 2.Clarify the things you have to do. 3.Organize your actionable items by category and priority. 4.Reflect on your to-do list. 5.Engage with the work as per the list. Get everything into the list and out of your head! Getting Things Done LIST Creating a Master List
  6. 6. Goals for Life WARREN BUFFET’S 2 LIST STRATEGY The first step is to write down your top 25 goals. These could be life goals, career goals, education goals, or anything else you want to spend your time on. Now, circle your top five goals on that list. Create this list as the first thing after you go home today. Finally, any goal you didn’t circle goes on an “avoid at all cost” list.
  7. 7. The Pareto Principle—or, the 80/20 rule—which says that 20% of your efforts tend to produce 80% of your results. Look for those tasks that don’t just get checked off, but that bring you real results. Urgent tasks are the ones you need to react to right away, like emails, phone calls, deadlines. While important tasks are ones that contribute to your long-term mission, values, and goals. •Urgent and Important: Complete these tasks as soon as possible •Important, but not urgent: List when you’ll do these and schedule it •Urgent, but not important: Delegate these tasks to someone else •Neither urgent nor important: Drop these from your schedule as soon as possible EISENHOWER MATRIX Urgent versus Important
  8. 8. Ranking daily tasks IVY LEE METHOD At the end of each day, write down the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow. Do not write down more than six tasks. Prioritize those six items in order of their true importance. When you arrive tomorrow, concentrate only on the first task. Keep working until the first task is resolved before moving on to the next one. At the end of the day, move unresolved items to a new list of six tasks for the following day, based on urgent vs. important. Repeat this process every working day. Allocate 30 minutes each week to find how well you are doing and aligning them for long term goals and objectives.
  9. 9. Separating similar tasks RANKING TASKS WITH ‘ABC’ Go through your list and give every task a letter from A to C (A being the highest priority/you can go upto D or E) For every task that has an A, give it a number which dictates the order you’ll do it, to signify importance Repeat until all tasks have letters and numbers against them
  10. 10. Setting a productive tone ‘EATING THE ELEPHANT’ How you start the day sets the tone for the rest of it. Avoiding the elephant you need to tackle shows lack of commitment to your own prioritization. Watching or keep the elephant aside does not help things. It goes nowhere unless you have re-delegated it. Tackling major issues first also sets a good example for the rest of the team; also, breaking it down into pieces and chewing it one bite at a time ensures you are both solving and learning to manage bigger challenges. Often, getting a large, hairy, yet important task out of the way first thing gives you momentum, inspiration, and energy to keep moving.
  11. 11. As you prioritize tasks, it’s important to remember to be flexible. No one knows what the future holds. Sometimes you might prioritize a task only to have expectations or deliverables changed. Humans are especially susceptible to the “sunk cost fallacy”— a psychological effect where we feel compelled to continue doing something just because we’ve already put time and effort into it. But the reality is that no matter what you spend your time doing, you can never get that time back. Sometimes our effort is better used switching boats than trying to fix a leak.DON’T BE A SISYPHUS SUNK COST FALLACY
  12. 12. Time Multiplier Model Prioritization is not only about tasks, it’s about prioritizing your time. If you invest 100 into your education business and it results in 1000 rupees of sales, then that investment is a multiplier. Another simpler idea is a hammer. It amplifies your effort to produce more output (and is a lot less painful than trying to nail into a wall with your bare hands). We all love this idea of getting something for nothing. We can do the same with our time! A time multiplier is a strategy or tool that creates more free time for you in the future. It’s the time management equivalent of sharpening your axe. • Can I eliminate this task? • If I can’t eliminate, can I automate it? • Can I delegate or outsource it for freeing time and higher efficiency? • Is the task the most important task to complete? • Designing the workplace to avoid distractions • Creating work habits to improve effectiveness versus efficiency ∆ time ∫life = death birth happiness time
  13. 13. Gather data on how you have been doing since you went into the list method. Change priorities if you are not satisfied with the outcomes you are managing. Look for patterns of energy bursts during the day; observe and start putting the most critical-to-success tasks in that slot. Track revised progress and keep adjusting. •High-value work when energy is highest. There’s time set aside first- thing in the morning and post-afternoon-slump for deep work (when your energy levels are typically higher). •Shallow work when energy levels are lower. There’s time for less cognitively intense, or “shallow work” like admin and meetings when your energy is typically lowest (between 1:30 – 3:30 pm). •Enough breaks. Time away from work helps keep your energy levels up throughout the day. You’re more likely to take breaks if you schedule them into your day. MEASURINGTIME Managing productive hours
  14. 14. …the purpose of knowledge is to serve the self first.
  15. 15. This is a self discovery model to analyse and uncover factors which stresses on the importance of self learning, feedback and disclosure to build trust and achieve our ambitions. ‘Johari Window’ is a model for self-awareness, personal development, group development and understanding relationship. In 1955, Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, two American psychologists developed a model called the ‘Johari Window’. They called the model ‘Johari Window’ after combining their first names, ‘Joe’ and ‘Harry’.
  16. 16. ‘Johari Window’ as a technique is highly effective when used appropriately to provide valuable information regarding one’s own self and others, which is an important characteristic which every leader needs to possess to succeed. The ‘Johari Window’ is based on a four- square grid. The ‘Johari Window’ is made up of a window with four 'panes’. The window is a square pane with a cross in the middle of it. This cross divides the window into four panes.
  17. 17. Self Known Unknown Others UnknownKnown Each pane represents two things – stuff known to you and stuff known to others. The four panes of the ‘Johari Window’ are called 'regions' or 'areas' or 'quadrants'. Each contains and represents the information - feelings, motivation, etc., in terms of whether the information is known or unknown by the person, and whether the information is known or unknown by others in the team. open/free/public arena area blind area unknown areahidden/facade area
  18. 18. JOHARI WINDOW CHANGE STRATEGY A change in one quadrant affects other quadrants It takes energy to hide/deny/be blind to behaviour that is involved during interactions and communications Trust increases awareness Forced awareness is undesirable and usually ineffective The smaller the open area, the poorer the communication
  19. 19. Self Known Unknown Others UnknownKnown open/free/public arena area blind area unknown areahidden/facade area Johari Window: The Learner The Learner person has a large public area, reflecting someone who is open about him/herself and receptive to feedback from others. This is the person who has a clear self-image and enough confidence in who he/she is to be visible to others. If in a management role, the Learner person has employees who tend to feel respected and encouraged to grow. What you value, your way of life, behaviors, emotions, knowledge, experience, skills, expectations and motivations which is known to you and to others.
  20. 20. Self Known Unknown Others UnknownKnown open/free/public arena area blind area unknown area hidden/façade area Johari Window: The Sceptic The Sceptic has a large hidden area, reflecting someone who keeps information with him/herself. This is a person who is always asking for information and giving little in return – the game player. If the Sceptic is in a management role, employees tend to feel defensive with and resentful of this individual. Contains information and values you choose to keep private, such as hidden agendas, dreams or ambitions.
  21. 21. Self Known Unknown Others UnknownKnown open/free/publicarena area blind area unknown area Johari Window: The Chatterbox The Chatterbox has a large blind area, reflecting someone who talks a lot but does not listen too well. This is the person who is pre-occupied with him/herself and doesn't know when to keep quiet. If the Chatterbox is in a management role, employees tend to get annoyed with this person and eventually will either actively or passively learn to shut him/her up. Includes information that others can see in you, but you cannot see in yourself. You might think you are a poor leader, but others think you exhibit strong leadership skills.
  22. 22. Self Known Unknown Others UnknownKnown open/free public arena area blind area unknown area hidden/façadearea Johari Window: The Snail The Snail has a large unknown area, reflecting a lack of self-knowledge and understanding. This is a person you can’t figure out. The snail’s behaviour tends to be unpredictable and security-oriented. If in a management role, employees tend to feel insecure and confused about expectations. Includes everything that you and others do not know about yourself. You may have hidden talents, for example, that you have not explored.
  23. 23. Others UnknownKnown Self Known Unknown open/free/public arena area blind area unknown area hidden/facade area Others’ observation Self- disclosure/exposure Shared Discovery FeedbacksolicitationSelf-discovery The most useful model to describe the process of human interaction, more specifically of giving and receiving feedback. Model depicts communication windows through which feedback is given and received. Through feedback and disclosure, you can reveal more about yourself to others and learn more about yourself from others. Johari Window Known to others Unknown to others Tell Known to self Unknown to selfAsk
  24. 24. JOHARI WINDOW IDEAL STRATEGY This is the kind of person whom you can trust. As the people get to see and know you, exactly as you are and can trust you. Such a window has a small blind area so that you know what others think about you. We need to understand, that the ideal shape of the window is one which has a large open area.
  25. 25. Different people have labeled these windows differently, but the principles are the same. The real value of the Johari Window lies in the consistent finding that if you measure, for any individual, the relative size of the different panes, those with the largest “Open Arena” seem to perform better, at everything. It doesn’t just make them “nice” people. It is linked to improved performance in areas ranging from salesmanship to politics and to leadership. So there are two processes at work here: Disclosure and Feedback. Disclosure decreases the Hidden Self pane and Feedback decreases the Blind Spot pane. As a result, the Open Arena gets larger. life =

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