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DevLearn 2017 Play to Learn workshop slides

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DevLearn 2017 Play to Learn workshop slides

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Slides from 2017 DevLearn "Play to Learn" workshop that teaches learning game design to corporate instructional designers and training professionals. Presented by Sharon Boller, president of Bottom-Line Performance, in Las Vegas, NV on October 24, 2017. Includes a series of slides that feature a variety of game development tools, such as Construct2, Unity, Unreal, Game Salad, and Knowledge Guru.

Slides from 2017 DevLearn "Play to Learn" workshop that teaches learning game design to corporate instructional designers and training professionals. Presented by Sharon Boller, president of Bottom-Line Performance, in Las Vegas, NV on October 24, 2017. Includes a series of slides that feature a variety of game development tools, such as Construct2, Unity, Unreal, Game Salad, and Knowledge Guru.

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DevLearn 2017 Play to Learn workshop slides

  1. 1. Play to Learn: Effective Game Design By Sharon Boller
  2. 2. Things to download for mobile play • Plants vs Zombies (free version on either iOS or Android) • Password Blaster by Bottom-Line Performance (free on either iOS or Android) • KGuru Quest app by Bottom-Line Performance – I pre-registered EACH of you for ATDGameDesignGuru. – Use email address you used to register for DevLearn + password DevLearn_17 Bottom-Line Performance 2
  3. 3. 3Bottom-Line Performance Who we are Sharon BollerJackie Crofts Bratt Conway
  4. 4. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  5. 5. Let’s play a game: Sequence Game Goal Align the cards into the correct sequence within 90 seconds. Get rid of cards that do not belong. Bottom-Line Performance 5
  6. 6. 6Bottom-Line Performance Set up • Organize your team into a single row. • The person whose birthday is closest to today is the dealer / team manager. • Agree on which end of team’s row contains Person #1. From there team members become Person 2, 3, 4, etc. • Dealers deal out all cards. – Do not deal cards to yourself. – Every other person must have at least ONE card. Some will have two.
  7. 7. 7Bottom-Line Performance Rules 1. Every team member (including dealer) must hold at least one card at game’s end. – Person #1 should have first card. All other cards distributed across the row in order. Person at the end of the row may have several cards. These must be in correct order. – Dealer should have all discards. 2. When game ends, you earn a scoring bonus for every second you are under 90 seconds. Get a penalty for every second you go over 90 seconds. 3. Lose game entirely if you fail to have cards sequenced 100% correctly.
  8. 8. Correct Sequence Bottom-Line Performance 8 1. Activity 2. Explicit 3. Goal 4. Challenge 5. Rules 6. Players 7. Interactivity 8. Players 9. Game Environment 10. Feedback Mechanisms 11. Clear Cues 12. Performing 13. Quantifiable outcome 14. Emotional reaction 30 60 90
  9. 9. Our definition An activity that has an explicit goal or challenge, rules that guide achievement of the goal, interactivity with either other players or the game environment (or both), and feedback mechanisms that give clear cues as to how well or poorly you are performing. It results in a quantifiable outcome (you win/you lose, you hit the target, etc). Usually generates an emotional reaction in players.
  10. 10. 10Bottom-Line Performance Turning this into a learning game… Game Goal Stay in business and minimize costs. Align the cards while using the least amount of $$ and time to accomplish the task.
  11. 11. 11Bottom-Line Performance Set up & Rules • Each row is a business. Your business is working on an essential project. Each 30 seconds used costs your business $300,000. 30 seconds = 1 month. • The person in the left-most chair is the project manager. • Each person in your row contributes $10,000 to this cost. • Finish the task within 2 minutes and earn a bonus for each team member. • If you need more time at 2 minutes, the PM must eliminate at least two jobs. • If you are not successful within 4 minutes, your company goes bankrupt.
  12. 12. What about gamification? Using game elements in a non-game situation. • Frequent flyer programs and other customer loyalty programs • Summer reading programs • Social Media (likes, rankings, etc.)
  13. 13. Basic Game Lingo Game goal • What player(s) have to do to win. No goal? Not a game. Mechanics • Rules for players • Rules for system. Keep complexity proportional to target game length. Design “around” a dynamic. Core Dynamic • What game play is about; how you win Tinkering with one element may vastly change game play. Game Elements • Features that help immerse you in game play
  14. 14. 14Bottom-Line Performance Activity #1: Play/Evaluate Timeline 1. Work in your table group. 2. Play Timeline for 10-15 minutes. 3. Use worksheet in workbook to evaluate game.
  15. 15. 15Bottom-Line Performance Evaluate Timeline 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  16. 16. Example of re-use… Knowledge Guru – Sales to Implementation Process: • 4 roles, 28-steps in process from start of conversation through support of product • GREAT re-use of concept from Timeline Bottom-Line Performance 16
  17. 17. 17Bottom-Line Performance Activity #2: Play/Evaluate Spot It 1. Work in your table group. 2. Play Spot It for 10-15 minutes. 3. Use worksheet in workbook to evaluate game.
  18. 18. 18Bottom-Line Performance Evaluate Spot It 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  19. 19. 19Bottom-Line Performance Activity #3: Plants vs. Zombies 1. Access game from your mobile device (tablet or phone). 2. Play game for 10 minutes.
  20. 20. 20Bottom-Line Performance Evaluate Plants vs. Zombies 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 3. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 4. What game elements did you notice? 5. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?)
  21. 21. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  22. 22. 22Bottom-Line Performance Resources For You Workbook pages cover a ton of material. We’ll highlight as we play learning games next.
  23. 23. 23Bottom-Line Performance Main Take-Aways • Game goal ≠ learning goal - you need BOTH • Before creating game, you: – Define instructional goal and objectives; keep in focus as you design the game to achieve them. • Audience matters • As you design the game, you want learning rationale for these things: - Choice of game mechanics (rules) - Game elements to include/exclude - Rewards/scoring
  24. 24. 24Bottom-Line Performance Play Password Blaster http://bottomlineperformance.com/passwordblaster Worksheet page 17
  25. 25. 25Bottom-Line Performance Play/Evaluate Password Blaster 1. What was the game goal? Was it fun? 2. What was the learning goal? Did you learn? 3. What was the core dynamic? Was it fun? 4. What were 1-3 mechanics (rules) that stood out? Did they help – or confuse you? 5. What game elements did you notice? 6. How did you know how you were doing? (What feedback did you get?) http://bottomlineperformance.com/passwordblaster
  26. 26. 26Bottom-Line Performance About the Project We partnered with TE Connectivity (TE) to create a mobile learning game for smartphones that helps distributors learn about their customers, and the applicable products for each customer so they can position the right products with the right customers.
  27. 27. 27Bottom-Line Performance Results • The app has been used 2,300+ times by 355+ distributors, and 100% of distributor users surveyed said they learned something about TE products while playing TE Town. • TE Town led to increased adoption of the sales enablement program by drawing in distributors who were previously not taking training. • Anecdotal feedback: “It was the best way to learn about our products by ourselves. I love it!”
  28. 28. 28Bottom-Line Performance Learners become mayor of TE Town. After a short tutorial, they can begin constructing the town.
  29. 29. 29Bottom-Line Performance The first mini-game introduces product applications.
  30. 30. 30Bottom-Line Performance The “customer type” grid is populated and they can begin selling product applications.
  31. 31. 31Bottom-Line Performance Learners continue through a series of mini-games to learn more about the products and discover what products are relevant to the customer type.
  32. 32. 32Bottom-Line Performance Learners continue through a series of mini-games to learn more about the products and discover what products are relevant to the customer type.
  33. 33. 33Bottom-Line Performance Learners continue through a series of mini-games to learn more about the products and discover what products are relevant to the customer type.
  34. 34. 34Bottom-Line Performance Learners continue through a series of mini-games to learn more about the products and discover what products are relevant to the customer type.
  35. 35. 35Bottom-Line Performance Learners continue through a series of mini-games to learn more about the products and discover what products are relevant to the customer type.
  36. 36. 36Bottom-Line Performance After completing a product, players can spend their treasury on upgrades for their town.
  37. 37. 37Bottom-Line Performance All the while, they’re tracking their progress and performance and competing on leaderboards.
  38. 38. 38Bottom-Line Performance Things to Notice 1. There is an overall game goal (construct/build town and maximize treasury). Mini-games each have dynamic too. 2. This game is very targeted. It’s probably NOT fun if you know zero about TE Connectivity or its products. 3. Every “plot” in the town has a series of mini-games that work together to build knowledge. A singe mini-game onlky gets you so far. 4. Most players (sales reps) only to 3-5 customer types. We assume most players will NOT play to the end.
  39. 39. 39Bottom-Line Performance Case Study: Feeding the World 1. Game goal: Work together to feed an ever- increasing world population, achieving production goals each year. 2. Learning goal: Reinforce all the safety steps and environmental protection steps taught during the previous 3.5 days of a NEO workshop.
  40. 40. 40Bottom-Line Performance Game play consists of four “rounds” with 7 turns to a round. Each round equates to 1 year of time. Number of people to feed each year increases to match real-world increases. The 7 turns mimic the 7 steps of mine to market process. Play complexity increases in final two rounds.
  41. 41. 41Bottom-Line Performance Resource cards – Total of 8 resources you can use on each turn. Most turns require 1-2. Inspector Cards – Reflect “chance” and can help or hurt your performance. You draw Inspector cards if the Inspector symbol comes up on a die roll.
  42. 42. 42Bottom-Line Performance Scenario Cards – Drawn on every turn. Player reads scenario aloud and 1) chooses the appropriate resource(s) to handle the scenario, 2) describe specifics of how resource(s) get used. After responding, player hands card to teammate on his or her right. That player flips the card and reads the correct response. Correct responses let team earn a phosphate toward the goal.
  43. 43. 43Bottom-Line Performance Learning + Game 1. Company mission linked to game goal. 2. Progress through game mirrored real-world process of going from mine to table. 3. Learning goal is to get players to match on-the-job resources to real-world scenarios they will encounter and to correctly identify appropriate use of resources. Game elements matched this. 4. Game element being collected (phosphate) is what the players actually mine. 5. Game board illustrated 7-step process. 6. Ever-increasing # of people to feed mirrors real-world statistic. 7. Chance cards reflected good/bad things that really happen on the job. 8. Mining inspections incorporated as “chance” element as well.
  44. 44. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  45. 45. Design to meet learning objectives Best Practices Embed into curriculum Keep rules, scoring simple Get learner comfortable FIRST Don’t focus on the win
  46. 46. Focusing only on fun Pitfalls to Avoid Skipping or minimizing playtesting Skipping a pilot Trying to teach everything Making games w/out playing games
  47. 47. 47Bottom-Line Performance Review: Game Design Guru 1. Access game at URL below. 2. Your email (from DevLearn registration) and DevLearn_17 are user name/password. 3. Play World A of the game. theknowledgeguru.com/ATDGameDesignGuru/
  48. 48. Define game & gamification Play Games and learn the lingo of games Best practices to follow; pitfalls to avoid. Break Play Learning Games! Learning + Game Lunch Game Design Guru – Q&A Create your own learning games: paper prototyping Playtest w/ your team Playtest w/ another team Share what you learned; wrap up B r e a k
  49. 49. DumpADDIE; goagileinstead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  50. 50. 50Bottom-Line Performance Prototyping… what is it? • Visuals are probably better than words here. • http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=k-nfWQLmlMk
  51. 51. 51Bottom-Line Performance Prototype Example
  52. 52. 52Bottom-Line Performance Prototype Example
  53. 53. 53Bottom-Line Performance Prototype Example
  54. 54. 54Bottom-Line Performance What you can learn from a prototype • How effective your game is at helping people learn what you want them to learn. • How engaging the game will be to learners. Do you have a “fun enough” game goal and is your core dynamic one that keeps people interested? • How effective the game elements are that you are using. Do the elements support your learning experience or detract from it? • How clear the rules are AND how they affect the fun and the learning. • The cognitive load on the learner – too high, too low, just right? • How complex the game might be to produce (without the expense of producing it before you find out!)
  55. 55. 55Bottom-Line Performance How do you create one? • Paper • Scissors • Crayons or markers • Tape
  56. 56. 56Bottom-Line Performance Activity: Learning Game Design Your Task: As a team, create and playtest a learning game. 1. Use game topic & content provided in workbook 2. Decide on a core dynamic from list provided. 3. Determine a theme and a game goal. 4. Decide cooperative or competitive. 5. Create a paper prototype, defining game mechanics (aka rules) as you go. 6. Playtest in your group. Use provided worksheet to document game design/rules, etc.
  57. 57. Building your prototype Task Elapsed time suggestion Review worksheet; gain understanding of instructional need, audience 15 minutes Choose a core dynamic (or 2 if you want to push yourself 15 minutes Choose a theme and a game goal. 15 minutes Start building game content and selecting game elements (strategy, chance, time, etc. Define and document game rules out as you go. 25 minutes Put together the prototype 35 minutes Do internal playtest; tweak as needed. 20 minutes Bottom-Line Performance 57
  58. 58. 58Bottom-Line Performance The Playtest Things to find out…. • Do game goal and learning goals complement one another? • Were players engaged throughout game play? • Are our rules at right complexity level for our audience and the training situation? • Do our game mechanics and game elements support real- world context? • Are our rules clear?
  59. 59. 59Bottom-Line Performance So what did you learn today about designing good learning games?
  60. 60. 60 Shameless book plug
  61. 61. Thank you! Sharon Boller President Bottom-Line Performance, Inc. Sharon@bottomlineperformance.com @Sharon_Boller (Twitter)
  62. 62. DIY* resources 62 Build It Yourself Tools and Templates • Google “Game making resources” LOADS of stuff comes up such as this: • https://boardgamegeek.com /thread/933849/designers- resources-list • Thaigi – tons of FREE game ideas on his site!! Relatively low-cost options: • eLearning Brothers templates for simple games • Knowledge Guru platform • C3 Softworks *Factor your time into “free.” You are NOT free. You cost your company $$.
  63. 63. Game Salad
  64. 64. Twine An open-source tool for creating interactive, nonlinear stories. https://twinery.org/
  65. 65. Chat Mapper Tool for writing and testing nonlinear dialogue and events.
  66. 66. Chat Mapper dialogue tree.
  67. 67. GameMaker Studio 2 Programming background NOT required, though helpful. Medium complexity to use; lots of support available. Amazing quality; no 3D. Rapidly growing in usage; strong user community built-in tutorials. GameMaker allows you to structure your game to work with a client/server model, dealing with all of the network management behind the scenes, while allowing you to focus on the game itself. https://www.yoyogames.com/
  68. 68. The Gamecrafter https://www.thegamecrafter.com/
  69. 69. Gameboard Backgrounds Shutterstock https://tinyurl.com/Shutterstockgames
  70. 70. Adobe Stock https://tinyurl.com/Adobegameboards
  71. 71. iStock Photos https://tinyurl.com/iStockGameVector
  72. 72. 73Bottom-Line Performance Raptivity: Templates • Template driven games. • Simple to use, little to no customization. One time events. • Free trial available. • www.raptivity.com
  73. 73. 74Bottom-Line Performance eLearning Brothers: Templates • Template driven games. • Simple to use, little to no customization. One time events. • Dozens of different templates for different types of games. • http://elearningbrothers. com/elearning-game- templates/
  74. 74. 75Bottom-Line Performance Construct2 HTML5 game creator by Scirra • Programming background NOT required. • Free open source game framework for the development of desktop and mobile HTML5 games. • Games using the tool can be made in JavaScript or TypeScript and features a Canvas and WebGL renderer that can automatically swap between the tools based on browser support. • Tutorials, user community. • http://phaser.io/
  75. 75. 76Bottom-Line Performance Unity • Complex to use. • Typically used for highly immersive experiences, simulations. Very, very powerful in terms of what it can do. • Can be 2D or 3D. • Users tend to have programming background or expertise. • https://unity3d.com/unity
  76. 76. 77Bottom-Line Performance Lumberyard • Programing knowledge necessary. • Typically used for highly immersive experiences, simulations. Very, very powerful in terms of what it can do. • Can be 2D or 3D. • Built in Multiplayer Capability. • Users tend to have programming background or expertise. • https://aws.amazon.com/lumberyard
  77. 77. 78Bottom-Line Performance Unreal • Programing knowledge necessary. • Typically used for highly immersive experiences, simulations. Very, very powerful in terms of what it can do. • Can be 2D or 3D. • Built in Multiplayer Capability. • Users tend to have programming background or expertise. • https://www.unrealengine.com/blog
  78. 78. Lynda.com (LinkedIn Learning)
  79. 79. Turbosquid, 3D Assets https://www.turbosquid.com/
  80. 80. Blender
  81. 81. 82Bottom-Line Performance Knowledge Guru • SaaS – pricing starts at $9,999 for one-year subscription. Includes 3 apps (Legend, Quest, Drive). • Designed for corporate learning audiences. • http://www.theknowledgeguru. com
  82. 82. 83Bottom-Line Performance Kahoot! • Gamifies learning; intended for virtual ILT as well as face-to-face ILT. Not for asynchronous eLearning. • Instructor displays questions or polls. Learners respond via mobile device. • FREE!!!!! • https://getkahoot.com/

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