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Climate-Smart Agriculture:
An opportunity for businesses
Alain Vidal
Director of Strategic Partnerships, CGIAR System Orga...
www.cgiar.org
CIMMYT
Mexico City
Mexico
IFPRI
Wash. DC
USA
CIP
Lima
Peru
CIAT
Cali
Colombia
Bioversity
International
Rome ...
www.cgiar.org
Actors and thinkers of globalization
How can we, leaders of G20 industries and leaders in
science, design a ...
Our food system:
driver and victim of climate change
www.cgiar.org
Agriculture,
FOrestry and Land Use
Non-Ag
Energy
70
2
Source: IPCC WGIII
Our food system:
a critical driver ...
Tomorrow:
50% of emissions to feed ourselves ?
“Business as usual” (BAU)
agriculture emissions
would comprise ~50% of
allo...
www.cgiar.org
Climate variability will impact
on food production
Source: Socioeconomic Data and
Applications Center (SEDAC...
www.cgiar.org
Suitability changes for coffee in East Africa
Arabica Robusta
How good / bad is climate smart agriculture ?
www.cgiar.org
Climate-smart agriculture :
Not a chocolate box !
How smart?
www.cgiar.org
Changing diets and reducing waste
http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
www.cgiar.org
Towards diets that are more
healthy and more climate-friendly
Tilman & Clark, 2014
www.cgiar.org
Reducing our food losses and wastage
www.cgiar.org
Reducing agricultural emissions
http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
Alternate-Wetting-and-Drying
(AWD)
30% water
20-50% GHG
Without compromising
yield
• Keep flooded for
1st 15 days and at
f...
COLOMBIA Storing Carbon deep in the Soil
 4 to 5 fold
increase in
animal production
Tropical forages for degraded pasture...
www.cgiar.org
Will climate-smart agriculture
make the difference ?
http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
 Sequestration
of carbon in
soil and trees
NIGER Bringing back the Sahel’s ‘underground forest’
5 million ha of land res...
GLOBAL Agroecology
 80% increases
in yield
 Resilience
to pest and
disease
 0.35 tons
Carbon ha-1 yr-1
37M ha of land i...
Climate-smart coffee-banana systems
 Microclimate: shading can reduce
temperature by >2° Celsius
 Shade biomass increase...
www.cgiar.org
Climate-smart agriculture:
rediscovering insurance
Horn of Africa – insuring the never-before-insured
agains...
Ground-testing Climate-Smart
Agriculture with businesses
The WBCSD CSA Platform
www.cgiar.org
The LCTPi could cut emissions by 17-18 GtCO2e
per year by 2030 versus business-as-usual
A global value chain group
CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE WORKING GROUP AROUND THE WORLD
www.cgiar.org
AA1:
BUILDING
SMALLHOLDER
RESILIENCE
AA2:
SCALING-UP
INVESTMENT IN CSA
AA3:
IMPROVING
BUSINESSES’ ABILITY
TO...
www.cgiar.org
AA3 - IMPROVING BUSINESSES’ ABILITY TO TRACE,
MEASURE AND MONITOR CSA PROGRESS
•Key commodities and geograph...
Science for sustainable businesses
www.cgiar.org
Understanding how
farmers invest
Variety +Pruning +Weeding +Mulching +Manure and fertilizer
Planting
materia...
Commodities at risk
% of respondents
56
%Soybean
56
%Corn
50%
Grains
38%
Sugar
38
% Rice
25%
Coffee
25%
Dairy
Meat
Vegetab...
Which types of collaboration hold the greatest latent
potential for impact & scale?
Actors within the same value chain
Col...
www.cgiar.org
Science for sustainable businesses
Candid and transparent approaches – with metrics
– help reconsidering far...
Thank you
a.vidal@cgiar.org
www.cgiar.org
Climate Smart Agriculture - an opportunity for businesses
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Climate Smart Agriculture - an opportunity for businesses

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Conference given to the Food Security Committee of the G20Y Summit, St-Moritz, Switerland, 22-24 Sep 2016

Publicado en: Medio ambiente
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Climate Smart Agriculture - an opportunity for businesses

  1. 1. Climate-Smart Agriculture: An opportunity for businesses Alain Vidal Director of Strategic Partnerships, CGIAR System Organization G-20Y Summit 2016, St Moritz, Switzerland
  2. 2. www.cgiar.org CIMMYT Mexico City Mexico IFPRI Wash. DC USA CIP Lima Peru CIAT Cali Colombia Bioversity International Rome Italy AfricaRice Cotonou Benin IITA Ibadan Nigeria ILRI Nairobi Kenya World Agroforestry Nairobi Kenya ICARDA Beirut Lebanon ICRISAT Patancheru India IWMI Colombo Sri Lanka IRRI Los Banos Phillippines World Fish Penang Malaysia CIFOR Bogor Indonesia 2
  3. 3. www.cgiar.org Actors and thinkers of globalization How can we, leaders of G20 industries and leaders in science, design a sustainable pathway to combat climate change while ensuring the prosperity of farmers and the agribusiness ?
  4. 4. Our food system: driver and victim of climate change
  5. 5. www.cgiar.org Agriculture, FOrestry and Land Use Non-Ag Energy 70 2 Source: IPCC WGIII Our food system: a critical driver of climate change Agriculture-related activities are 24% of global greenhouse gas emissions (2010)
  6. 6. Tomorrow: 50% of emissions to feed ourselves ? “Business as usual” (BAU) agriculture emissions would comprise ~50% of allowable emissions to achieve a 2°C world Gt CO2e per year 9 11 40 74 2010 2050 (Business as usual) 2050 (2°C target) Non-agricultural emissions Agricultural and agriculture-driven land-use change emissions ~50% 49 85 22
  7. 7. www.cgiar.org Climate variability will impact on food production Source: Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) Crop yields drop by 2050 under BAU  5% per °C  Maize 16%  Rice 21%  Wheat 42%  Coffee 50%
  8. 8. www.cgiar.org Suitability changes for coffee in East Africa Arabica Robusta
  9. 9. How good / bad is climate smart agriculture ?
  10. 10. www.cgiar.org Climate-smart agriculture : Not a chocolate box !
  11. 11. How smart?
  12. 12. www.cgiar.org Changing diets and reducing waste http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
  13. 13. www.cgiar.org Towards diets that are more healthy and more climate-friendly Tilman & Clark, 2014
  14. 14. www.cgiar.org Reducing our food losses and wastage
  15. 15. www.cgiar.org Reducing agricultural emissions http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
  16. 16. Alternate-Wetting-and-Drying (AWD) 30% water 20-50% GHG Without compromising yield • Keep flooded for 1st 15 days and at flowering • Irrigate when water drops to 15 cm below the surface 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 15.0 8.7 -42% 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 tCO2-eq/ha*season 4.9 3.9 -20% 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 -22%-28% 6.0 4.7 6.4 4.6 Hilly mid-slopes Delta low-lying Summer- Autumn Winter- Spring Sander et al. in press IRRI AWDConventional
  17. 17. COLOMBIA Storing Carbon deep in the Soil  4 to 5 fold increase in animal production Tropical forages for degraded pastures  Resilience to drought  35% increase in soil carbon  75% below 20 cm Fisher et al. 1994
  18. 18. www.cgiar.org Will climate-smart agriculture make the difference ? http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission
  19. 19.  Sequestration of carbon in soil and trees NIGER Bringing back the Sahel’s ‘underground forest’ 5 million ha of land restored, over 200 million trees re-established  Reduces drought impacts  Additional half a million tonnes of grain per year
  20. 20. GLOBAL Agroecology  80% increases in yield  Resilience to pest and disease  0.35 tons Carbon ha-1 yr-1 37M ha of land in developing countries Pretty et al. 2006
  21. 21. Climate-smart coffee-banana systems  Microclimate: shading can reduce temperature by >2° Celsius  Shade biomass increases carbon stock→ CC mitigation  Shade plants increase revenue and food security for smallholders income up > 50% Van Asten et al (2014)
  22. 22. www.cgiar.org Climate-smart agriculture: rediscovering insurance Horn of Africa – insuring the never-before-insured against catastrophic drought  IBLI (index-based livestock insurance) contract holders receive payouts when forage conditions deteriorate  14,000 pastoralists in  200,000 US$ paid out  33% reduction in food aid
  23. 23. Ground-testing Climate-Smart Agriculture with businesses The WBCSD CSA Platform
  24. 24. www.cgiar.org The LCTPi could cut emissions by 17-18 GtCO2e per year by 2030 versus business-as-usual
  25. 25. A global value chain group CLIMATE SMART AGRICULTURE WORKING GROUP AROUND THE WORLD
  26. 26. www.cgiar.org AA1: BUILDING SMALLHOLDER RESILIENCE AA2: SCALING-UP INVESTMENT IN CSA AA3: IMPROVING BUSINESSES’ ABILITY TO TRACE, MEASURE AND MONITOR CSA PROGRESS AA4: IMPLEMENTING AGRICULTURE-DRIVEN ZERO DEFORESTATION AND SUSTAINABLE LAND-USE COMMITMENTS CSA PRIORITY ACTION AREAS
  27. 27. www.cgiar.org AA3 - IMPROVING BUSINESSES’ ABILITY TO TRACE, MEASURE AND MONITOR CSA PROGRESS •Key commodities and geographies of concern identified •Five ‘road-test’ countries identified in conjunction with Action Area 1, Action 1 Identify priorities for productivity, livelihoods, incomes and resilience •Highest emission Industry sectors and top 5 country emitters for these industries identified •Countries matched to WG Member company supply chains Identify priorities for agricultural GHG emissions •Monitoring methodologies & toolkits reviewed under each of the 3 CSA Pillars •Preferred methodologies assembled into a framework Develop a corporate CSA measurement protocol •WG member companies have volunteered to ‘road-test’ the CSA measurement protocol for 2 years •Road-tests launched Road-test the corporate CSA measurement protocol •Global measurement protocol developed with corporate CSA measurement protocol and other global measurement initiativesMeasure global progress towards Vision 2030
  28. 28. Science for sustainable businesses
  29. 29. www.cgiar.org Understanding how farmers invest Variety +Pruning +Weeding +Mulching +Manure and fertilizer Planting material Extension Service providers Credit services Farmer coops Stepwise investments ➣ higher efficiency
  30. 30. Commodities at risk % of respondents 56 %Soybean 56 %Corn 50% Grains 38% Sugar 38 % Rice 25% Coffee 25% Dairy Meat Vegetables Forest products Cotton Fish Tomato Potato 19% 19% 13% 13 % 19% 13% 13% 44 %Pal m Coco a 31 % Landscape analysis on Agribusiness collaboration for sustainable agriculture and food security
  31. 31. Which types of collaboration hold the greatest latent potential for impact & scale? Actors within the same value chain Collaboration within a geographic and demographic reach Structurally complex multitude of contributors, geographies and value chains Correcting Supply chain Inefficiencies Strengthening landscape level approaches Improving the Business enabling Environment A B C Landscape analysis on Agribusiness collaboration for sustainable agriculture and food security
  32. 32. www.cgiar.org Science for sustainable businesses Candid and transparent approaches – with metrics – help reconsidering farmers and their real issues Develop climate-smart agriculture to re-create value in supply chains – and measure it Opportunities for businesses to enhance their social (adaptation, food security) and environmental (mitigation) responsibility
  33. 33. Thank you a.vidal@cgiar.org www.cgiar.org

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