Se ha denunciado esta presentación.
Utilizamos tu perfil de LinkedIn y tus datos de actividad para personalizar los anuncios y mostrarte publicidad más relevante. Puedes cambiar tus preferencias de publicidad en cualquier momento.

Leadership communication: creating image, protecting reputation, dealing with disruption

Communication as a leadership skill is becoming more important than ever before. As we have seen in the case of Elon Musk, how CEOs signal their leadership on social media can make or break a company's reputation. Social is making PR a more critical corporate function, and now leadership communication by executives online is the key to public relations success for senior leaders.

Libros relacionados

Gratis con una prueba de 30 días de Scribd

Ver todo
  • Sé el primero en comentar

Leadership communication: creating image, protecting reputation, dealing with disruption

  1. 1. Leadership Communication Creating image Protecting reputation Dealing with disruption 2018.09.12 Limestone Leaders Link at Kingston
  2. 2. Communicate your signal through noise § Telling your story... § To all the people who need to hear it... § So that those people will do and think... § What you want them to do or think! § Know who you are § Understand what you do § Think highly of you, agree with you § Be educated, be persuaded, be motivated to take action
  3. 3. Signal Leadership Communication Inc. § A public relations consultancy for c-level executives dealing with digital disruption § Exclusively serving leaders with PR counsel that is senior, strategic – and social § Focused on image creation, issues management, relationship building, and reputation protection § Serving clients in Asia, Europe and North America § Partnered with the Nanos Research Group
  4. 4. Social media seen as most damaging A large majority believe that social media has the capacity to do the greatest damage to an individual or organization’s image. 84% 71% 71% Social Media Online News Broadcast Television 52% 48% Print Newspapers Radio Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, March 31st to April 4th 2016, n=1000, accurate to 3.1 percentage points plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.
  5. 5. Image vs. Reputation IMAGE § What you frame § The picture today § What people see § Superficial § Controlled § Disposable REPUTATION § The public decides § Builds over time § How folks feel § Deeper § Earned § Durable
  6. 6. 1. Lust I want this 2. Greed I must get it 3. Gluttony I must have more 4. Sloth I haven’t thought about it 5. Wrath I am extremely angry about this 6. Envy I want what s/he’s got; I’m worth it 7. Pride I’m better; I deserve this; look at me The seven deadly digital sins
  7. 7. Good things social media can do § crowd-source ideas § share experiences § sign-up volunteers § channel opinion § motivate activists § induce direct action § alert the public Educate the people and inspire positive change!
  8. 8. Bad things social media can do § deny the honest truth § spread rumours § traffic vicious gossip § deflect attention § smear opponents § ‘rabble rouse’ Manipulate the masses and exploit anger!
  9. 9. Source: Citrix, 2014 Social media is visual media
  10. 10. Social media throughout the day
  11. 11. The algorithm dynamic § Your posts are successful or not based on what the algorithm thinks will keep eyeballs on their social network to sell more advertising § AI-enabled weaponized social media § Tapping into political polarities puts up big numbers but then you end up fishing in the same pond § Thought leadership performs well, with long form ‘signal’ content doing better than short form § Programming content into SEO strategy is key
  12. 12. Media cloverleaf with search @ centre Source: Edelman, 2013
  13. 13. The way PR works has changed § Nowadays people know you and think about you based on what they find through searching on Google § Mainstream media links massively improve your ‘signal’ on search § Amplification via social networks helps improve your SEO clout even more § Often more people see your ‘coverage’ via Google and social media than from source § Studies show that 90% of people only search as far as page 1, so page 1 ‘above the fold’ remains the right place to be § Much of this occurs during ‘micro-moments’ on a mobile device
  14. 14. These lines will never cross again
  15. 15. Social media tells the story of your life
  16. 16. Framing How much of who you truly are do you wish to share in public?
  17. 17. Drivers of ‘publicity’ Colour Contrast Content + Eyebrow raising + Vivid audio, visual or text imagery + Pure novelty + Contrapuntal: x versus y + Black and white, not grey + The correction of the past with the present + More than brazen assertion + Burden of proof and evidence + Third party legitimacy
  18. 18. People are wired think visually
  19. 19. The public relations imperative
  20. 20. Social media is making PR more important When asked about the importance of PR today compared to 10 years ago, more than three- quarters (76%) feel that PR is more important, 16 percent (16%) say that it is as important while five percent (5%) say it is less important and three percent (3%) are unsure. Do you think that with the rise of social media, public relations, also known as PR, is becoming more important, less important or as important for organizations today compared to 10 years ago? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, May 24th to 25th 2017, n=1000, accurate to 3.1 percentage points plus or minus, 19 times out of 20. 76 16 5 3 More important As important Less important Unsure
  21. 21. But ‘classic PR’ no longer works § Endemic ‘PR speak’ is fast becoming unfashionable We take these allegations seriously…. What I can tell you is… § You have to walk the talk, not just talk the walk § Plastic personas are ‘out’ – the real person is ‘in’ § Lead with flaws, communicate ups and downs § Communication perfection breeds resentment § Authenticity trumps almost everything
  22. 22. 2001
  23. 23. Trump’s PR impact on leaders § Many leaders took note of how Trump got elected by communicating every day on Twitter – for the first time ever, they really felt the power of social § Some were repelled and horrified and others were captivated and (privately) inspired to imitate him § Many executives now think they had better be on social, although not to communicate like Trump § Nowadays the risk of being absent on social is seen to be greater than the risk of being present
  24. 24. The importance of communication skills for leaders continues to increase
  25. 25. “The art of communication is the language of leadership”
  26. 26. EU SME Centre (2014)
  27. 27. Social media is now the most powerful communication platform
  28. 28. Digital disruption in marketing
  29. 29. Social media seen driving PR disasters More than half of Canadians (54%) say that social media is a major contributor to PR disasters for companies. Roughly a third of (35%) feel that social media is a minor contributor and five percent (5%) say that social media is not a contributor to PR disasters. Six percent are unsure. Would you say that social media like Twitter and Facebook are major contributors, minor contributors or not contributors to public relations disasters for companies? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, May 24th to 25th 2017, n=1000, accurate to 3.1 percentage points plus or minus, 19 times out of 20. 5435 5 6 Major contributor Minor contributor Not contributor Unsure
  30. 30. But many leaders are struggling on social media
  31. 31. Authentic and actual Refreshing candor The devil may care! Attack and apologize Demagoguery Because he can!
  32. 32. Social sentiment = Public sentiment? DATACONOMY (2017)
  33. 33. Leadership communication dimensions and drivers
  34. 34. Spheres of social CEO PR influence DATACONOMY (2017)
  35. 35. Risk-averse leaders are extremely cautious about social media
  36. 36. “Despite the fact that Twitter has become the ‘go-to’ social network for journalists and breaking news, only 7% of the Canadian CEOs researched have Twitter accounts.”
  37. 37. Celebrities seem to be relatively uninhibited…
  38. 38. Kylie Tweets…
  39. 39. …then SNAP stock plummets
  40. 40. When something goes wrong (and it always does), all eyes go online looking for the leader
  41. 41. Best way to respond in a PR disaster Just over seven in ten (70%) say that the best way for a troubled organization to respond is to “acknowledge the problem and communicate on social media.” Twenty-three percent (23%) say organizations should “acknowledge the problem but not communicate on social media.” Two percent (2%) said they should “communicate nothing” and five percent (5%) are unsure. When an organization has a PR disaster on social media like Twitter or Facebook, what would you say is the best way for the troubled organization to respond? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, May 24th to 25th 2017, n=1000, accurate to 3.1 percentage points plus or minus, 19 times out of 20. 70 23 2 5 Acknowledge and communicate Acknowledge but don't communicate Communicate nothing Unsure
  42. 42. Importance of social media use by CEOs for crisis communication Six out of ten (61%) feel that it is important (28%) or somewhat important (33%) for CEOs to use social media to “directly communicate with the public” when a company has a crisis. When a company has a crisis and something major goes wrong, are the following important, somewhat important, somewhat unimportant or unimportant as things to do to communicate about the problem [ROTATE]: that the CEO use social media like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to directly communicate with the public? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, June 26-28th 2018, n=1000, accurate to ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding. 28 33 15 18 6 Important Somewhat important Somewhat unimportant Unimportant Unsure
  43. 43. Importance of CEO social media use for communicating crisis updates Almost two in three Canadians (65%) feel that it is important (33%) or somewhat important (32%) for CEOs to use social media to “share updates about the problem” when a company has a crisis. When a company has a crisis and something major goes wrong, are the following important, somewhat important, somewhat unimportant or unimportant as things to do to communicate about the problem [ROTATE]: that the CEO use social media like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn share updates about the problem? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, June 26-28th 2018, n=1000, accurate to ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding. 33 32 15 15 5 Important Somewhat important Somewhat unimportant Unimportant Unsure
  44. 44. Starbucks Philadelphia case study
  45. 45. Importance of CEO social media use for explaining feelings about crisis problem More than half of Canadians (53%) think that it is unimportant (30%) or somewhat unimportant (23%) for CEOs to use social media to “explain how he or she feels about the problem” when a company has a crisis. When a company has a crisis and something major goes wrong, are the following important, somewhat important, somewhat unimportant or unimportant as things to do to communicate about the problem [ROTATE]: That the CEO use social networks like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to explain how he or she feels about the problem? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, June 26-28th 2018, n=1000, accurate to ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding. 16 25 23 30 7 Important Somewhat important Somewhat unimportant Unimportant Unsure
  46. 46. Oh really !?
  47. 47. The absence of leaders creates an information vacuum filled by critics and naysayers
  48. 48. Meanwhile, inside many organizations, digital has been taken over by marketers who see social as a way to sell stuff, not build relationships
  49. 49. Companies are now expected to communicate like real people, not like machines or things
  50. 50. The leader is the ultimate personification of the brand
  51. 51. For leaders, social media should be about real relationships, custom connectivity with real people
  52. 52. “Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely”
  53. 53. Mass customized comms at scale? “We can really only maintain about 150 meaningful relationships at any time. Study after study confirms that most people have about five intimate friends, 15 close friends, 50 general friends and 150 acquaintances”
  54. 54. In 2016, Ryerson’s Infoscape Research Lab found that Canadian CEOs share several different types of content on social media, including: thought leadership (20%), business promotion and philanthropy (tied at 13%), mentorship (11%), and governance (9%). Strikingly, though, only 2.5% of posts promoted or lauded the employees of a CEO’s company. Fewer than 1% of tweets were directed at – or spoke to – the experience of individual consumers or clients of a company.
  55. 55. Tuning into people’s emotions, channeling their ideas, sensing their sentiments, rallying them to shared purposes
  56. 56. Communication that prevents PR disaster
  57. 57. “Providing information as we get it”
  58. 58. “This is my worse nightmare”
  59. 59. If they fail to ‘feel,’ leaders will magnify mistakes when inevitable crisis situations occur…
  60. 60. Communication that causes PR disaster
  61. 61. The next generation of leaders will be social CEOs
  62. 62. CEO headhunters seek social savvy
  63. 63. The six dimensions of social-media-literate leadership McKinsey Quarterly (2013)
  64. 64. Social leadership comms keys Personal § speaks to the experience of the communicator, aligns it to target audience sensibility Polite § never hurts feelings of others on purpose Direct § cuts to the chase and transmits ‘signal’ Clear § there should be no doubt about the message Timely § ‘now’ is more narrow and fleeting than ever Careful § consider the angles and audiences beforehand Compelling § persuasive and leading Framed § well in advance, there should be a deliberate decision to share within specific content spheres and personality attributes Image conscious § but not vain Other oriented § not ‘me’ and ‘I’ but ‘we’ and ‘us’
  65. 65. Social leadership comms keys Visual § 80% of our 100 billion neurons are for visual processing (University of Rochester 2004) Fluent § free-flowing, smooth, seemingly effortless, easy, natural, fluid Imperfect § perfection = too slick = not credible Inspiring § Communication designed to strike a chord, lay down a pattern, show the way Complementary § Leadership communication should build on and not replace the corporate PR of the company – the two streams should be in concert and well coordinated
  66. 66. Amid all the cool digital hype, remember the warmth of analog communication
  67. 67. Preferred method of public relations for CEO crisis communication A majority (53%) say that when a company has a crisis, CEOs should “communicate primarily through their public relations team communicating with journalists in the media” while about a third (34%) say CEOs should “communicate with the public directly on social networks.” When a company has a crisis because something major goes wrong, should a CEO: communicate with the public directly on social networks or communicate primarily through their PR team communicating with journalists in the media? Nanos Research, RDD dual frame hybrid telephone and online random survey, June 26-28th 2018, n=1000, accurate to ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding. 53 34 13 Communicate through their PR team with journalists in the media Communicate with the public directly on social networks Unsure
  68. 68. “We think we know someone, but the truth is that we only know the version of them that they have chosen to show us” — Taylor Swift
  69. 69. The looking glass self
  70. 70. Thank you ! @bobpickard @signaleadership 2018.09.12 Limestone Leaders Link at Kingston

×