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What fuels pedagogic innovation? 22nd of May 2018 University of Leeds

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What fuels pedagogic innovation? 22nd of May 2018 University of Leeds

  1. 1. What fuels pedagogic innovation? 12th Research Students’ Education Conference, University of Leeds, 22 May 2018 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/99/Monarch_butterfly_Caterpillar. jpg Chrissi Nerantzi ,@chrissinerantzi #RSEC2018 Twitterpoll
  2. 2. The plan •Who am I •Discuss pedagogic innovation in higher education •What could institutions do to foster pedagogic innovation #RSEC2018
  3. 3. Where are we now? •Who am I •Discuss pedagogic innovation in higher education •What could institutions do to foster pedagogic innovation #RSEC2018
  4. 4. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.6110033,- 8.8601238,3416532m/data=!3m1!1e3 My journeys so far #RSEC2018
  5. 5. Where are we now? •Who am I •Discuss pedagogic innovation in higher education •What could institutions do to foster pedagogic innovation #RSEC2018
  6. 6. Build a model that shows what a pedagogic innovator does https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/20/Lego_dublo_arto_alanenpaa_5.JPG #RSEC2018
  7. 7. “Today, innovation means anything, everything… and nothing.” (Godin, 2015)
  8. 8. http://www.flickr.com/photos/almarams/3902611177/ Kids love καινοτομίες (innovations) But it is dangerous for traditions, the state, threatens status quo, stability!
  9. 9. “The major domains involve different modes of inquiry, different rules/symbols, different ways to generate new knowledge, and different disciplinary cultures and historical developments. This suggests that before one can be creative, one must first master the respective discipline.” (Blessinger & Watts, 2017, 7) Does this also apply to innovating in teaching? #RSEC2018
  10. 10. The Cognitive Domain and Bloom’s Taxonomy 11 evaluation synthesis analysis application comprehension knowledge creating evaluating analysing applying understanding remembering Bloom’s Taxonomoy (1956) Anderson and Krathwohl Revision (2001)Educational Psychology Interactive: The Cognitive Domain Is this problematic? #RSEC2018
  11. 11. “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.” Pablo Picasso “If you don’t know the rules, you don’t know not to break them. The amateur doesn’t fear failure.” (Kessels, 2016, 43) #RSEC2018
  12. 12. Is there hope? By Gail Spencer #RSEC2018 #RSEC2018
  13. 13. C Wo what is going on? Little-c and big-C (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997) #RSEC2018
  14. 14. Evolution new ideas from existing ideas Synthesis combination of existing ideas Revolution brand new ideas Re-application existing ideas in new light Changing direction new path when old doesn’t work Creative methods (Harris, 1998) #RSEC2018 Isaac Newton https://upload.wikimedia.org/wi kipedia/commons/5/50/Sir_Isaac _Newton_by_Sir_Godfrey_Knell er%2C_Bt.jpg If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants…
  15. 15. https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4111/5201275209_d20346c3ec_b.jpg Diffusions of Innovation Bell (Rogers, 1962) #RSEC2018 “The paradox of innovation is that it is accepted as an innovation when it has become imitation.” Piero Scaruffi
  16. 16. Pedagogic Innovators project with Barbara Thomas Survey: 148 What is pedagogic innovation? What are the conditions that make it happen? #RSEC2018
  17. 17. “It is a new way of teaching, unlike those commonly used; it is bespoke and surprises students. Consequently, it heralds a change driven by a transitory adaption to pedagogical objectives and the new student profile. It stems from a reflection that is pedagogical, intellectual, creative, psychological and sustained, and that shapes itself progressively through a multi-level and multi-impact process linked both to the audience and the discipline or the technology and that aims to improve quality, like a desire to make the subject understood and foster success.” #RSEC2018 A definition of pedagogic innovation (Walder, 2014, 200)
  18. 18. Purpose not clear > experimentation Purposeful > desired outcomes, change New “Someone who tries a new approach.” “Someone who brings different ideas and approaches to their teaching - who tries to do things differently. Someone who looks for new ways to make the learning more effective and engaging.” New outside disciplinary tradition “Someone who experiments, breaks moulds, tries new things and approaches, particularly ones which might be unusual for the discipline” “Someone who is prepared to step out of traditional approaches in order to enhance student engagement and learning.” Novel “An individual who questions traditional educational convention and thinking, and develops new concepts and processes.” “A willingness to try new things, to challenge the boundaries of existing pedagogies and to risk new teaching and learning strategies with the outcome of improved learning for students.” Using technology “Trying out new ways of doing staff training using learning technology.” “Someone who tries new things, new practices, new technology (but not necessarily technology-related), in order to enhance learning or address a known problem. Also, someone who uses those new ways to implement old ideas, or new theories about teaching and learning, or who uses new methods to teach new, evolving and emerging themes and topics.” What does a pedagogic innovator do? #RSEC2018
  19. 19. Nerantzi & Thomas (to be submitted) #RSEC2018
  20. 20. n=148 #RSEC2018
  21. 21. Individual By Gail Spencer
  22. 22. “Someone who is prepared to put enormous effort and energy into trying to achieve something in spite of the challenges and barriers. Who does not give up when things do not work out but learns from the experience and tries again. Who is self-critical and analytical about their own performance. Who reflects on and learns from their and other's experiences” Respondent 5 “I take a lot of career risks (innovating in spite of resistance), changing jobs as often as necessary to stay engaged and empowered.” Respondent 136 #RSEC2018
  23. 23. Others By Gail Spencer
  24. 24. “A network of like-minded souls to discuss ideas with. This requires some institutional support (which in my case is lacking, to a large extent - I innovate despite my institution not because of it).” Respondent 84 #RSEC2018
  25. 25. Institution By Gail Spencer
  26. 26. “Right now, what I really want is to be influential enough to be able to continue shaking up the university systems to make them take teaching seriously, to reward those who do it well, and to value it. I don't really mind if that involves promotion or not, but I do recognise that professors tend to get taken more seriously than those of us who are not - so ideally, a Chair would be nice. But if not, just having the ear of those who are powerful, and being able to influence them.” Respondent 84 #RSEC2018
  27. 27. Nerantzi & Thomas (to be submitted) #RSEC2018
  28. 28. Where are we now? •Who am I •Discuss pedagogic innovation in higher education •What could institutions do to foster pedagogic innovation #RSEC2018
  29. 29. #RSEC2018
  30. 30. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/WU_Wien%2C_Library_%26_Learning_Center%2C_Zaha_Hadid_009.JPG/800px- WU_Wien%2C_Library_%26_Learning_Center%2C_Zaha_Hadid_009.JPG What do institutions do? Big investment in physical spaces “… large scale investments, for example in building projects and refurbishments, may not be particularly effective in improving student satisfaction.” (Burgess, Senior & Moores, 2018, online) #RSEC2018
  31. 31. Institutional push as well? “… there is a strong encouragement from all quarters for innovators to find cost-effective practices.” (Cowan, 2006, 138) #RSEC2018 https://images.pexels.com/photos/47047/gold-ingots-golden-treasure-47047.jpeg?auto=compress&cs=tinysrgb&h=750&w=1260
  32. 32. Purpose not clear > experimentation Purposeful > desired outcomes, change New “Someone who tries a new approach.” “Someone who brings different ideas and approaches to their teaching - who tries to do things differently. Someone who looks for new ways to make the learning more effective and engaging.” New outside disciplinary tradition “Someone who experiments, breaks moulds, tries new things and approaches, particularly ones which might be unusual for the discipline” “Someone who is prepared to step out of traditional approaches in order to enhance student engagement and learning.” Novel “An individual who questions traditional educational convention and thinking, and develops new concepts and processes.” “A willingness to try new things, to challenge the boundaries of existing pedagogies and to risk new teaching and learning strategies with the outcome of improved learning for students.” Using technology “Trying out new ways of doing staff training using learning technology.” “Someone who tries new things, new practices, new technology (but not necessarily technology-related), in order to enhance learning or address a known problem. Also, someone who uses those new ways to implement old ideas, or new theories about teaching and learning, or who uses new methods to teach new, evolving and emerging themes and topics.” But what drives innovators? #RSEC2018
  33. 33. https://images.pexels.com/photos/247851/pexels-photo-247851.jpeg?w=940&h=650&auto=compress&cs=tinysrgb So how could institutions do? #RSEC2018 “The institution, […] retains a major and decisive impact [on pedagogic innovation] embodying the role of an orchestra conductor, who can constrain, at leisure, their musicians to play the tune of their choosing. “ (Walder, 2015, 15)
  34. 34. The Greenhouse at Manchester Met (Nerantzi, 2016), Open cross- boundary communities (Nerantzi, 2017, Nerantzi & Gossman, submitted) 1. Supporting communities “Above all, there needs to be an institutional community of practice for educators, which provides a supportive and encouraging environment for people who wish to innovate within their teaching.” Respondent 60 #RSEC2018
  35. 35. 2. Greenhousing “Freedom to experiment; more time and space for reflection. Free up space in the timetable for experimentation.” Respondent 90 #RSEC2018 The Greenhouse (Nerantzi, 2016)
  36. 36. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/99/Monarch_butterfly_Caterpillar. jpg 3. Investing in people… “Innovators are people who create and innovate regardless of whether there is a strategic change initiative they are the key resource for leading bottom-up change and to changing institutional culture.” (Jackson, 2014, 41)#RSEC2018
  37. 37. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ed/Common_tiger_butterfly.jpg Open your wings and fly! … so that they can transform… #RSEC2018
  38. 38. OPEN CALL!!! Special Issue: Discovering innovative application of LEGO® in Learning and Teaching (Nerantzi & James eds.) #RSEC2018
  39. 39. Bateson, P. & Martin, P. (2013) Play, playfulness, creativity and innovation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Blessinger, P. & Watts, L. S. (2017) History and nature of creative learning, in: Blessinger, P. & Watts, L. S. (eds.) (2017) Creative Learning in higher education. International perspectives and approaches, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 3-13. Bloom, B. S. (1984) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Book 1: Cognitive Domain, 2nd edition. New York: Longman. Brookfield, S. (2017) Creative approaches to stimulate classroom discussions, in: Watts, L.S. & Blessinger, P. (2017) Creative learning in higher education. International perspectives and approaches, London: Routledge, pp. 159-176. Cowan, J. (2006). On becoming an innovative university teacher. Reflection in action. The Society for Research in Higher Education. 2nd edition. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997) Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention, Harper Perennial Jackson, N. J. (2014). The Wicked Challenge of Changing a University Encouraging Bottom-up Innovation through Strategic Change. Accessed from http://www.creativeacademic.uk/uploads/1/3/5/4/13542890/__the_wicked_problem_of_changing_a_university.pdf on 26th March 2018 Godin, B. (2015) Innovation contested: The idea of innovation over the centuries, London: Routledge. James, A. & Brookfield S. (2014) Engaging Imagination. Helping Students become creative and reflective thinkers, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Nerantzi, C. (accepted) The playground model revisited, a proposition to boost creativity in academic development, in: James, A. & Nerantzi, C. (eds.) (work-in- progress) The Power of Play, Palgrave, submission deadline of book manuscript May 2018. Nerantzi, C. (2016) Using Ecological Metaphors to Represent Professional Growth: Our extraordinary ‘Greenhouse’, its creative academic gardeners and the growing of pedagogical ideas, in: Exploring Creative Ecologies, Creative Academic Magazine, Issue 5, September 2016, pp. 64-70, available at http://www.creativeacademic.uk/magazine.html Nerantzi, C. (2017) Towards a framework for cross-boundary collaborative open learning for cross-institutional academic development. PhD thesis, Edinburgh: Edinburgh Napier University, available at https://www.napier.ac.uk/research-and-innovation/research-search/outputs/towards-a-framework-for-cross-boundary- collaborative-open-learning-for Nerantzi, C. & Gossman, P. (submitted, Feb18) Cross-boundary communities, an alternative vision for academic development, Compass Journal, London: University of Greenwich, in February 2018, https://journals.gre.ac.uk/index.php/compass Nerantzi, C. & Thomas, B. E. (work-in-progress) What fuels pedagogic innovation, seeking journal at the moment Rhodes, M. (1961) An analysis of creativity, The Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 42, No. 7, Apr., 1961, pp. 305-310, Available at http://www.jstor.org/stable/20342603 Robinson, K. (2009) The Element. How finding your passion changes everything, London: Penguin. Trendence UK (2018) Value for money: the student perspective, London, available at https://studentsunionresearch.files.wordpress.com/2018/03/value-for- money-the-student-perspective-final-final-final.pdf Walder, A. (2014) The concept of pedagogical innovation in higher education, in: Education Journal 2014; 3(3): 195-202, Available at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Walder/publication/301687758_The_concept_of_pedagogical_innovation_in_higher_education/links/572216dc08ae e491cb32db25.pdf Walder, A. (2015) Obstacles to innovation: The fear of jeopardising a professorial career?, in: British Journal of Éducation Vol.3, No. 6, pp.1-16, June 2015, available at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Walder/publication/301687800_OBSTACLES_TO_INNOVATION_THE_FEAR_OF_JEOPARDISING_A_PROFESSORIAL_CA REER/links/57221abe08ae262228a5ca90.pdf References
  40. 40. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ed/Common_tiger_butterfly.jpg #RSEC2018 What fuels pedagogic innovation? 12th Research Students’ Education Conference, University of Leeds, 22 May 2018 Chrissi Nerantzi , @chrissinerantzi Thank you!

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