EV682 PGCE Primary
Safeguarding and Wellbeing
Teachers Standards
. . . establish a safe and stimulating
environment for pupils, rooted in mutual
respect
. . . maintain ...
“Social Inclusion”

“Together, we are working to create prosperous, inclusive and
sustainable communities for the 21st cen...
Building on success
•
•
•
•
•
•

‘Sure Start’ children’s centres
development of ‘extended’ or ‘full service’ schools
and o...
Every Child Matters (2003)
• Increasing the focus on supporting families and
carers
• Ensuring necessary intervention take...
The five outcomes








be healthy
stay safe
enjoy and achieve
make a positive
contribution
achieve economic
well-b...
Multi-agency working:
focus for response
• Safeguarding children and young people
• Supporting health and well being
• Res...
New practices
•
•
•
•
•
•

Extended schools
Children’s centres
Multi-agency teams
Service co-location
Children’s Trusts an...
The developing vision
• Reducing the power and reach of local authorities
• Promote academies, free schools, social
enterp...
Moving forward
professional issues
•
•
•
•

Skills and expertise
Identity and status
Pay, conditions, and career progressi...
How are you feeling today?
I’m feeling
happy!

How do you know you feel
happy?
How would someone else
Let’s go back to happy
Measuring Happiness (Ofsted 2012)
What makes you happy?
being safe;
being well looked after;
being treated with respect an...
However . . .
• 10% (or half a million children) are ‘struggling’
with their lives (The Good Childhood Report, 2012
• 10% ...
What is this
thing called
wellbeing?
An indicator of the
child doing well
emotionally;
feeling comfortable
with themself
“Wellbeing is a social construct and represents a
shifting set of meanings – wellbeing is no less
than what a group or gro...
Leuven (2005) signals
• Enjoyment
• Relaxed
• Vitality

• Openness
• Self-confidence
• Being in touch with self
A scale for wellbeing
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Extremely low
Low
Moderate
High
Extremely high
What does this all mean in the
classroom?
• Validating children’s emotions; being a role model
• Encourage all children to...
The true measure of a nation’s standing is
how well it attends to its children – their
health and safety, their material s...
Relationships within the classroom
Teacher relationships with the children

“Never smile before Easter!”

Is this an exaggeration or is it psychological
sens...
Teacher relationships with the children

____________________________________________________
Strict

Permissive

Autocrac...
Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships

• Teaching standards from Sept 2012
• Teachers should maintain ‘good relationships
with ...
Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships

‘The most frequently encountered non-family, positive
role models in the lives of resili...
Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships

Classroom community
Bruce Johnson (2008) Teacher–student
relationships which promote resilience
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Being available
Showing an inte...
Teacher relationships with the children

“Keep smiling!”
Resilience

Ordinary Magic


We like the definition that was coined by
developmental psychologist Masten. She
describes resilience as ‘Ordinary
Magi...
Link between perceived teacher support
and Pupil resilience
‘Resilience rests fundamentally on
relationships. The desire t...
http://www.boingboing.org.uk/
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.ezproxy.brighton.ac.uk/doi/10.1111/j.14679752.2009.00720.x/full;jsessionid=488DE6D7BCBF41A6...
e-Safety
Contact
• Online grooming
• Cyberbullying
• Social networking
Contact:

Content:

Commercialism:

Online grooming

Viewing inappropriate
content

E-commerce
Privacy

Cyberbullying

Soc...
Commercialism
•
•
•
•

E-commerce
Privacy
Junk/spam email
Premium rate services

By MediaPhoto.Org (mediaphoto.org Own wor...
How can we empower children
to keep themselves safe online?
“Children and young people need to be empowered to keep
themse...
Implications for teacher practice
 Whose responsibility is it to tackle issues of e-safety?

(Parents? Teacher? Whole sch...
E-Safety Resources
• CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection
http://www.ceop.police.uk/
• Childnet International
h...
References
Bruce Johnson (2008) Teacher–student relationships which
promote resilience at school: a micro-level analysis o...
Safeguarding and Wellbeing
Safeguarding and Wellbeing
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Safeguarding and Wellbeing

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Safeguarding and Wellbeing

  1. 1. EV682 PGCE Primary Safeguarding and Wellbeing
  2. 2. Teachers Standards . . . establish a safe and stimulating environment for pupils, rooted in mutual respect . . . maintain good relationships with pupils, exercise appropriate authority, and act decisively when necessary . . . having regard for the need to safeguard pupils’ wellbeing, in accordance with statutory provisions
  3. 3. “Social Inclusion” “Together, we are working to create prosperous, inclusive and sustainable communities for the 21st century - places where people want to live that promote opportunity and a better quality of life for all.” Introduction to Social Exclusion Unit report (2001)
  4. 4. Building on success • • • • • • ‘Sure Start’ children’s centres development of ‘extended’ or ‘full service’ schools and out of school activities increased investment in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) improved speech and language therapy tackling homelessness reforms to youth justice
  5. 5. Every Child Matters (2003) • Increasing the focus on supporting families and carers • Ensuring necessary intervention takes place before children reach crisis point • Addressing weak accountability and poor integration • Ensuring that the people working with children are valued, rewarded and trained
  6. 6. The five outcomes      be healthy stay safe enjoy and achieve make a positive contribution achieve economic well-being
  7. 7. Multi-agency working: focus for response • Safeguarding children and young people • Supporting health and well being • Responding to barriers to achieving • Supporting children and young people in transition • Providing “things to do and places to go to” • Providing information, advice and guidance
  8. 8. New practices • • • • • • Extended schools Children’s centres Multi-agency teams Service co-location Children’s Trusts and Children’s Plans Team Around the Child (TAC)
  9. 9. The developing vision • Reducing the power and reach of local authorities • Promote academies, free schools, social enterprises and mutual organisations • Remove “bias towards inclusion” • Amending legislative requirement for schools and other services to work together • Promoting ‘National Citizenship’ • Removing ‘red tape’ • Education from 0 - 18
  10. 10. Moving forward professional issues • • • • Skills and expertise Identity and status Pay, conditions, and career progression Focus and ideology of practice
  11. 11. How are you feeling today? I’m feeling happy! How do you know you feel happy? How would someone else
  12. 12. Let’s go back to happy
  13. 13. Measuring Happiness (Ofsted 2012) What makes you happy? being safe; being well looked after; being treated with respect and fairness; being able to make own decisions; stability, and “money can make you happy but not genuinely make you happy”
  14. 14. However . . . • 10% (or half a million children) are ‘struggling’ with their lives (The Good Childhood Report, 2012 • 10% of these have mental health issues (ibid) • The number of children ‘dissatisfied’ is on the increase (ibid) • The UK was bottom in an international comparison for children’s wellbeing (Unicef, 2007) • Wellbeing diminishes with age (ibid)
  15. 15. What is this thing called wellbeing? An indicator of the child doing well emotionally; feeling comfortable with themself
  16. 16. “Wellbeing is a social construct and represents a shifting set of meanings – wellbeing is no less than what a group or groups of people collectively agree makes a ‘good life’.” (Ereaut and Whiting, 2008, p1)
  17. 17. Leuven (2005) signals • Enjoyment • Relaxed • Vitality • Openness • Self-confidence • Being in touch with self
  18. 18. A scale for wellbeing 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Extremely low Low Moderate High Extremely high
  19. 19. What does this all mean in the classroom? • Validating children’s emotions; being a role model • Encourage all children to communicate and discuss how they feel • Use stories, drama, role play and puppets to develop understanding and empathy • Prioritise opportunities to promote secure attachments/relationships • Take into account cultural perspectives on emotions • Refer to supportive materials, e.g. SEAL/SEAD • Listen and look
  20. 20. The true measure of a nation’s standing is how well it attends to its children – their health and safety, their material security, their education and socialization, and their sense of being loved, valued, and included in the families and societies into which they are born. (Unicef, Report card 7, 2007)
  21. 21. Relationships within the classroom
  22. 22. Teacher relationships with the children “Never smile before Easter!” Is this an exaggeration or is it psychological sense? (Discuss with a partner)
  23. 23. Teacher relationships with the children ____________________________________________________ Strict Permissive Autocracy Democracy My classroom Our classroom Does the climate in the classroom depend upon relationship between child and teacher?
  24. 24. Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships • Teaching standards from Sept 2012 • Teachers should maintain ‘good relationships with pupils’ • (Standard 7 behaviour -DfE, 2011 p.7)
  25. 25. Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships ‘The most frequently encountered non-family, positive role models in the lives of resilient children were favourite teachers who took a personal interest in them…’ Howard et al. (1999, p. 313) The teacher is of vital importance because the teacher will have an impact, through their emotional responses, on the child’s regulatory abilities. McLaughlin, 2008.
  26. 26. Good Teacher-Pupil Relationships Classroom community
  27. 27. Bruce Johnson (2008) Teacher–student relationships which promote resilience • • • • • • • Being available Showing an interest Listening Teaching the basics Being positive Intervening Being human-connecting
  28. 28. Teacher relationships with the children “Keep smiling!”
  29. 29. Resilience Ordinary Magic
  30. 30.  We like the definition that was coined by developmental psychologist Masten. She describes resilience as ‘Ordinary Magic’, meaning that in many cases, a resilient outcome doesn’t come about as a result of something particularly earth shattering happening, it’s just everyday stuff, like getting a teacher to give a bit more attention to a particularly disadvantaged child for example. Masten describes it as:  ‘Positive adaptation to adversity despite serious threats to adaptation or development’.
  31. 31. Link between perceived teacher support and Pupil resilience ‘Resilience rests fundamentally on relationships. The desire to belong is a basic human need, and positive connections with others lie at the very core of psychological development; strong supportive relationships are critical for achieving and sustaining adaption.‘Luthar (2006, 760)
  32. 32. http://www.boingboing.org.uk/
  33. 33. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.ezproxy.brighton.ac.uk/doi/10.1111/j.14679752.2009.00720.x/full;jsessionid=488DE6D7BCBF41A65646D29DEADF42EA.f02t03 No tissues or issues!
  34. 34. e-Safety
  35. 35. Contact • Online grooming • Cyberbullying • Social networking
  36. 36. Contact: Content: Commercialism: Online grooming Viewing inappropriate content E-commerce Privacy Cyberbullying Social networking Plagiarism and content: Copyright Junk email or spam Inaccurate information Premium rate services User-generated content Blogging
  37. 37. Commercialism • • • • E-commerce Privacy Junk/spam email Premium rate services By MediaPhoto.Org (mediaphoto.org Own work) [CC-BY3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0) By Maxi Gago (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b y-sa/3.0)
  38. 38. How can we empower children to keep themselves safe online? “Children and young people need to be empowered to keep themselves safe – this isn’t just about a top-down approach. Children will be children – pushing boundaries and taking risks. At a public swimming pool we have gates, put up signs, have lifeguards and shallow ends, but we also teach children how to swim” (Byron, 2008, p.2). Byron Review – Children and New Technology Because of the changing nature of risks we need to ‘listen*ing] to children to learn what new risks they are experiencingLivingstone et al., 2011, p.29
  39. 39. Implications for teacher practice  Whose responsibility is it to tackle issues of e-safety? (Parents? Teacher? Whole school?)  How do we, as teachers, address the issues through our practice?     Responding to incidents Pre-emptive approaches School policy Your own professional conduct  confidentiality of pupil information  your personal/professional online presence
  40. 40. E-Safety Resources • CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection http://www.ceop.police.uk/ • Childnet International http://www.childnet-int.org/ • Thinkuknow (resources for children of all ages as well as for parents/carers and teachers) http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/ • Kidsmart (resources for young children) http://www.kidsmart.org.uk • Jenny’s Story DVD (an Internet safety resource for KS3) http://www.childnet-int.org/jenny/index.html
  41. 41. References Bruce Johnson (2008) Teacher–student relationships which promote resilience at school: a micro-level analysis of students’ views, British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 36:4, 385-398. Howard, S., Dryden, J. and Johnson, B. (1999) Child Resilience: review and critique the literature, Oxford Review of Education,25(3) 307-323. McLaughlin, C. (2008) Emotional well-being and its relationship to schools and classrooms: a critical reflection, British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 36:4, 353-366.

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