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Passive solar, passive cooling and daylighting

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Passive solar, passive cooling and daylighting

  1. 1. Passive Solar, <br />Passive Cooling <br />and Daylighting<br />
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES<br />Learn about :<br />The history of Passive Solar<br />Energy efficient design<br />Energy end uses<br />Passive Heating and Passive Cooling<br />Daylighting<br />Renewables<br />
  3. 3. The History of Passive Solar<br />
  4. 4. 5th Century BC Greece<br />Diminished fuel sources brought design changes.<br />Community Planning employed passive solar design.<br />
  5. 5. Passive Solar in Ancient Greece<br />Aristotle noted, builders made sure to shelter the north side of the house to keep out the cold winter winds. <br />And Socrates, who lived in a solar-heated house, observed, "In houses that look toward the south, the sun penetrates the portico in winter" which keeps the house heated in winter. <br />
  6. 6. Cross section of a Roman heliocaminus. The term means "sun furnace."<br />
  7. 7. Roman heliocaminus<br />The Romans used the term to describe their south-facing rooms. They became much hotter in winter than similarly oriented Greek homes because the Romans covered their window spaces with mica or glass while the Greeks did not.<br />
  8. 8. Solar Greenhouses from Ancient Rome to 18th Century Europe<br />With the fall of the Roman Empire, so too came the collapse of glass for centuries in either buildings or greenhouses.<br />Canvas covered the glass in the evenings to hold in heat.<br />
  9. 9. 19th Century Solar Remodel with attached greenhouse<br />
  10. 10. American Solar Heritage: Anastasi Indians<br />
  11. 11. Pueblo Indians’ Sky City<br />Continuously inhabited since the 12th century<br />
  12. 12. Southwest Adobe<br />Orientation, control & thermal mass<br />
  13. 13. Adobe = Thermal Mass<br />
  14. 14. The colonial "salt box" house, typical of New England architecture of the 18th century.<br />
  15. 15. Maximizes Southern Exposure<br />
  16. 16. The solar-heated Rose Elementary School in Tucson Arizona. It obtained over 80% of its heat from solar energy for an entire decade, beginning in 1948.<br />
  17. 17. Village Homes subdivision built in the late 1970s in Davis, California. The layout of the subdivision allowed every house to face the winter sun.<br />
  18. 18. Today<br />
  19. 19. Generation and use of energy (electric, gas, oil, coal) are major contributors to air pollution and global climate change.<br />
  20. 20. And pollution of our rivers…….<br />MOUNTAIN TOP REMOVAL<br />
  21. 21. Improving energy efficiency and using renewable energy sources are effective ways to improve air quality and reduce the impacts of global warming<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Energy efficiency is a cornerstone of any green building project.<br />
  25. 25. Passive Solar<br />Passive solar buildings aim to maintain interior Thermal comfort.<br />Passive solar building designis one part of green building design, and doesnot include active systems such as Mechanical ventilation or Photovoltaics<br />.<br />
  26. 26. Passive Solar Design<br />The 47-degree difference in the altitude of the sun at solar noon between winter and summer forms the basis of passive solar design.<br /><ul><li>Passive solar building design revolves around 5 main aspects;</li></li></ul><li>Aperature: The set of windows and overhangs that determine how much sun enters the building.<br />Absorber: The material that the sun’s ray come into contact with.<br />Thermal Mass: The material that stores the sun’s thermal energy for re-release after sundown.<br />Distribution: The means by which the thermal energy is released to the living/working spaces.<br />Control: The techniques used to control the collection and distribution of the sun's thermal energy.<br />
  27. 27. Design Aspects:<br />
  28. 28. Passive Solar Design Themes:<br />Direct Gain: Sunlight shines into and warms the living space.<br />Indirect Gain: Sunlight warms thermal storage, which then warms the living space.<br />Isolated Gain: Sunlight warms another room (sunroom) and convection brings the warmed air into the living space.<br />
  29. 29. Passive Solar Heat<br />Passive solar design can reduce heating temperatures by 30-50%<br />Windows need to be incorporated within 30 degrees of due south<br />
  30. 30. indirect gain systems<br />  <br />In the indirect gain, a storage mass collects and stores heat directly from the sun and then transfers heat to the interior space. There are several indirect gain passive solar systems : <br />
  31. 31. Indirect Gain Water Wall <br />
  32. 32. Trombe Wall<br />
  33. 33. Isolated Gain Space:<br />Sunroom<br />
  34. 34. Passive Solar Design Aspects<br />
  35. 35. PASSIVE COOLING<br /><ul><li>Plant deciduous trees for shade
  36. 36. Natural ventilation is a key cooling strategy
  37. 37. Install window overhangs and awnings</li></li></ul><li>Deciduous Shade Trees<br />Primarily shade windows and paved areas<br />Keep trees an appropriate distance from the house and utility lines<br />
  38. 38. Deciduous shade trees offer the best solution for keeping out low-angle sunlight from west and south windows in summer.<br />
  39. 39. Shade trees can reduce summer <br />air-conditioning costs by 25 – 40%.<br />
  40. 40. Trees can create a microclimate that is up to 15 degrees cooler than the surrounding area. <br />
  41. 41. Trees also clean the air, create habitat and play areas for children as well as add aesthetic beauty to the neighborhood.<br />
  42. 42. Overhang and Awnings <br />
  43. 43. Overhangs are important parts of passive solar heating and natural cooling.<br />
  44. 44. Awnings and Overhangs<br />
  45. 45. Help keep the heat of the sun out during the summer.<br />
  46. 46. Wood trellises<br />
  47. 47. Arbors<br />
  48. 48. Adjustable or demountable awnings made of fabric or metal<br />
  49. 49. Allow heat to enter during the winter.<br />
  50. 50. DAYLIGHTING<br /><ul><li>What is Daylighting?
  51. 51. Energy Savings
  52. 52. Productivity, Health and Well Being</li></li></ul><li>This?<br />
  53. 53. Or This?<br />
  54. 54.
  55. 55. Clerestory Windows<br />
  56. 56. Modeling with the Heliodon<br />
  57. 57. Heliodon at PG&E Energy Center<br />
  58. 58. Daylight modeling with Heliodon<br />Daylight after construction<br />
  59. 59. Daylighting Saves Energy and Improves Productivity<br />
  60. 60. Deck Mounted Skylight<br />
  61. 61. Sun tracking systems<br />
  62. 62. Skylights<br />
  63. 63.
  64. 64. Solar Tubes:Inexpensive, Easy to install …<br />
  65. 65.
  66. 66. Andvery effective<br />
  67. 67. Daylighting on a large scale<br />
  68. 68.
  69. 69. REVIEW OBJECTIVES<br />Learn about :<br />The history of Passive Solar<br />Energy efficient design<br />Passive Heating <br />Passive Cooling<br />Daylighting<br />
  70. 70. We did not inherit the Earth from our parents. We are borrowing it from our children. Chief Seattle<br />

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