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Ecological metadesign

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Ecological metadesign

  1. 1. An ecological Meta-design framework for open learning ecosystems<br />Kai Pata & Mart Laanpere<br />Tallinn University, Center for Educational Technology<br />ECER 2011<br />
  2. 2. Design languages<br />Design professions in various domains (architecture, movie industry, EU FP7, car manufacturing) have well developed design languages<br />No widely-accepted professional design language for education (candidates: didactics, instructional design, learning design): weak generalisability of learning/teaching design patterns <br />Potential solution: to look at educational context as an ecological system<br />
  3. 3. Open learning ecosystem<br />Open learning ecosystem is<br />an adaptive complex and dynamic learning system<br />in which self-directed learners<br />designtheir learning environments and activities using Web 2.0 softwareand<br />follow open education principles by sharing freely over the internet knowledge, ideas, infrastructure- and learning approaches.<br />
  4. 4. An ecological approach to learning<br />Learning in open learning ecosystems is the process in which learner and the system (community, culture) detects and corrects errors in order to fit and be responsive.<br />accumulation<br />Learning niche for a community/culture<br />Knowledge, ideas, PLE-configurations and learning approaches<br />NETWORK OF LEARNERS<br />LEARNER<br />adaptation<br />
  5. 5. What do we need?<br />Without wishing to suppress such a bottom-up self-emergence of eLearning designs, providing teachers in learning institutions with design solutions that enable them toregain some co-control in the learner-initiated activities and systems is needed.<br />
  6. 6. Meta-design<br />Meta-design is designing the design process for cultures of participation – creating technical and social conditions for broad participation in design activities (Fisher et al., 2004).<br />Equally important aspects of ecological Meta-Design focuses are: <br />the learning ecosystem evolution by end-user design, and <br />nourishing the end-user design process by creating the scaffolds for designing (see Ehn, 2008; Fisher et al., 2004).<br />
  7. 7. Connectivity with PLE components (Dippler, Tallinn University development)<br />Distributed course assembling tools (Dippler)<br />Learning contract tools (LeContract)<br />User monitoring, accumulation and visualization<br />Suitable<br />Monitoring tools (EduFeedr)<br />The tools to support meta-design in open learning ecosystems (Pata, 2011)<br />
  8. 8. Learners’ role<br />In learning ecosystems autonomous learners continuously develop and dynamically change design solutions to support their learning.<br />They incorporate into their personal learning environments different Web 2.0 tools, networking partners and artifacts, and monitor the state of the whole learning ecosystem to adapt their design solutions and learning objectives to the system and to other learners.<br />
  9. 9. Teachers’ role<br />Providing the teacher-created scaffolds and incentives for the learners' design activities that would foster the accumulation of learning niches:<br />a) monitor the evolution of the open learning ecosystem,<br />b) provide learners with the options that enhance and speed up the self-directed network-formation process (e.g. tags, mashups),<br />c) analyze the emerging affordances within the learning community, and provide analytical guidance for them aiding to make design decisions and selecting learning activities (e.g. social navigation, semantic navigation), and<br />d) seed learning activities into the open learning ecosystem that are based on self-organization (e.g. swarming).<br />
  10. 10. The limitations for applying meta-design in an open learning ecosystem <br />There is the need for dynamic accumulation and monitoring systems for learning niche formation to be used by each learner for benefiting from particular open learning ecosystem and allowing them to participate in the course design<br />Accumulated knowledge, ideas, PLE-configurations and learning approaches (community‘s learning niche)<br />
  11. 11. Conclusions<br />Need for professional (meta)design language for educators<br />Models borrowed from ecology seem to be adaptable to educational context<br />The next steps: empirical exploratory studies and validation studies<br />

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