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日本庭園
JAPANESE
GARDENS
It is an island nation in East
Asia. Located in the Pacific
ocean & often called the
"Land of the Rising Sun“
Japan is a s...
Japan is predominantly temperate but
varies greatly from north to south.
The northernmost zone, Hokkaido, has
a humid cont...
INTRODUCTION
Japanese garden has a history
of 1000 years
The gardens of the Emperors
and nobles were designed for
recrea...
Were developed under the
influences of the Chinese
gardens.
Japanese gardens first
appeared on the island
of Honshu the ...
HISTORYOF JAPANESEGARDENS
 Early Japan (before 794)
 Heian Period (794-1185)
 Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1192-1573...
Early Japan (before 794)
One of the earliest garden forms in Japan were
sacred places in the midst of nature, which human...
This early garden form can be recognized at
some ancient Shinto shrines
East Palace Garden at Heijo Palace (Nara)
Heijo Palace the imperial residence in the Japanese
capital city during the Nar...
Heian Period (794-
1185)
They began
building Shined
Gardens at their
palaces and villas,
large gardens which
were used fo...
In the late Heian Period, Pure Land Buddhism gained
popularity, promising its devotees a spot in the Western
Paradise of ...
KamakuraandMuromachiPeriods(1192-1573)
The military rulers
embraced the newly
introduced Zen
Buddhism, which
would exert ...
Azuchi-Momoyama Period (1573-1603)
Tea gardens were
introduced during this period
Tokushima Castle garden
on the island ...
Edo
Period(1603-1867)
During this period no major
change or feature was brought
to the garden.
The size of the elements ...
Meiji Period (1868–1912)
 The Meiji period saw the
modernization of Japan, and
the re-opening of Japan to
the west
 Many...
Modern Gardens (1868 to present)
During the Showa period (1926–1988), many traditional
gardens were built by businessmen ...
BASIC RULES IN DESIGN OF JAPANESE GARDENS
Elements
Stone lanterns
Sculptures
Stone wash basin
Kio fishes
Bridges
Pathways
Ponds
Stepping stones
Water falls
Hills
Te...
Plants and trees
Garden of the 10th to 12th
centuries contained cherry, plum
trees, pines and willows.
Influence of the Ze...
Japanese Fir Japanese
stripped-bark
maple
Japanese
maple
Japanese
alder
Japanese
angelica tree
Japanese cherry
birch
Japanese
hornbeam
Japanese cornel
dogwood Japanese cedar
Bonsai and
bonseki
TYPES OF JAPANESE GARDENS
Karesansui Gardens Or Dry Gardens
Tsukiyama Gardens Or Wet Garden
Chaniwa Gardens Or Tea Gard...
KARESANSUI/ DRY GARDENS
Also known as rock gardens and
waterless stream gardens.
Influenced by Zen Buddhism and
can be f...
TSUKIYAMA/WET
GARDENS
They strive to make a smaller
garden appear more spacious.
Shrubs are utilized to block
views of sur...
CHANIWA/TEA
GARDENS
They are built for tea
ceremonies.
Tea house is where the
ceremonies occur, and the styles
of both the...
POCKET GARDENS
These are mainly observed in
the urban areas
Easier to maintain than larger
plots, the tiny patches are p...
NON RECTILINEAR SHAPED WATER BODY
ROCKS AND
BOULDERS
REPRESENTING
MOUNTAINS
POOL REPRESENT
LAKES.
RAKED SAND
REPRESENT OCE...
Difference between Japanese
and Chinese gardens
Chinese Japan
Architecture Building at the center
of of garden
Builing at ...
REFERENCE
Wikipedia.com
Japanese Gardens by Gunter Nitschke
Slawson, David A. Secret Teachings in the Art
of Japanese G...
THANK YOU
ありがとう
Anusha 45
Sai Yaswanth 46
Dinesh 48
Akash 50
Thabish 61
Pranaya 63
Pujutha 65
Pushpak 69
Santosh 79
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
Japanese Landscape
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Japanese Landscape

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Japanese Landscape

  1. 1. 日本庭園 JAPANESE GARDENS
  2. 2. It is an island nation in East Asia. Located in the Pacific ocean & often called the "Land of the Rising Sun“ Japan is a strata volcanic group of 6852 islands. About 73 percent of Japan is forested, mountainous, and unsuitable for agricultural, industrial, or residential use. 日本 JAPAN
  3. 3. Japan is predominantly temperate but varies greatly from north to south. The northernmost zone, Hokkaido, has a humid continental climate with long, cold winters and very warm to cool summers. Precipitation is not heavy, but the islands usually develop deep snowbanks in the winter. Average winter temperature in Japan is 5.1 °C (41.2 °F) and the average summer temperature is 25.2 °C (77.4 °F). CLIMATE
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION Japanese garden has a history of 1000 years The gardens of the Emperors and nobles were designed for recreation and aesthetic pleasure Gardens of Buddhist temples were designed for contemplation and meditation.
  5. 5. Were developed under the influences of the Chinese gardens. Japanese gardens first appeared on the island of Honshu the large central island of Japan Great gardens can be found throughout Japan, with particularly many in the former capital of Kyoto. Japanese landscape mainly tries to symbolize islands in seas covered with forests
  6. 6. HISTORYOF JAPANESEGARDENS  Early Japan (before 794)  Heian Period (794-1185)  Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1192-1573)  Azuchi-Momoyama Period (1573-1603)  Edo Period (1603-1867)  Meiji period (1868-1912)  Modern Gardens (1912 to present)
  7. 7. Early Japan (before 794) One of the earliest garden forms in Japan were sacred places in the midst of nature, which humans marked by pebbles.
  8. 8. This early garden form can be recognized at some ancient Shinto shrines
  9. 9. East Palace Garden at Heijo Palace (Nara) Heijo Palace the imperial residence in the Japanese capital city during the Nara period
  10. 10. Heian Period (794- 1185) They began building Shined Gardens at their palaces and villas, large gardens which were used for elaborate parties and for recreational activities.
  11. 11. In the late Heian Period, Pure Land Buddhism gained popularity, promising its devotees a spot in the Western Paradise of the Amida Buddha or Pure Land. Daikaku-ji Byōdō-inKyoto Imperial Palace Jōruri-ji
  12. 12. KamakuraandMuromachiPeriods(1192-1573) The military rulers embraced the newly introduced Zen Buddhism, which would exert a strong influence on garden design  The most extreme development towards minimalism was the Karesansui Dry Garden
  13. 13. Azuchi-Momoyama Period (1573-1603) Tea gardens were introduced during this period Tokushima Castle garden on the island of Shikoku Tai-an tea house at Myōki- an Temple in Kyoto built in 1582 by Sen no Rikyū Bridges became the part of the gardens during this time
  14. 14. Edo Period(1603-1867) During this period no major change or feature was brought to the garden. The size of the elements were made big. Imitations of famous natural landscapes, like Mount Fuji, or scenes from Taoist or Buddhist legends, or landscapes illustrating verses of poetry were made.
  15. 15. Meiji Period (1868–1912)  The Meiji period saw the modernization of Japan, and the re-opening of Japan to the west  Many of the old private gardens had been abandoned and left to ruin. In 1871, a new law transformed many gardens from the Momoyama and Edo periods into public parks
  16. 16. Modern Gardens (1868 to present) During the Showa period (1926–1988), many traditional gardens were built by businessmen and politicians  After World War II, the principal builders of gardens were no longer private individuals, but banks, hotels, universities and government agencies.  The Japanese garden became an extension of the architecture of the building. New gardens were designed by architecture school graduates, and often used modern building materials
  17. 17. BASIC RULES IN DESIGN OF JAPANESE GARDENS
  18. 18. Elements Stone lanterns Sculptures Stone wash basin Kio fishes Bridges Pathways Ponds Stepping stones Water falls Hills Tea houes Rocks Water Stones Fence Gate
  19. 19. Plants and trees Garden of the 10th to 12th centuries contained cherry, plum trees, pines and willows. Influence of the Zen sect and watercolor painting from Southern China transformed the colorful Japanese garden in the Middle Ages. Flowers, flowering plants and shrubs were regarded as signs of frivolity and were replaced by evergreen trees that symbolized eternity.
  20. 20. Japanese Fir Japanese stripped-bark maple Japanese maple
  21. 21. Japanese alder Japanese angelica tree
  22. 22. Japanese cherry birch Japanese hornbeam
  23. 23. Japanese cornel dogwood Japanese cedar Bonsai and bonseki
  24. 24. TYPES OF JAPANESE GARDENS Karesansui Gardens Or Dry Gardens Tsukiyama Gardens Or Wet Garden Chaniwa Gardens Or Tea Gardens Pocket Gardens
  25. 25. KARESANSUI/ DRY GARDENS Also known as rock gardens and waterless stream gardens. Influenced by Zen Buddhism and can be found at Zen temples of meditation Found in the front or rear gardens at the residences. No water presents in gardens. raked gravel or sand that simulates the feeling of water. The rocks/gravel used are chosen for their artistic shapes, and mosses as well as small shrubs. Plants are much less important (and sometimes nonexistent)
  26. 26. TSUKIYAMA/WET GARDENS They strive to make a smaller garden appear more spacious. Shrubs are utilized to block views of surrounding buildings. The gardens main focus is on nearby mountains in the distance. The garden has the mountains as part of its grounds. Ponds, streams, hills, stones, trees, flowers, bridges, and paths are also used frequently in this style as opposed to a flat garden.
  27. 27. CHANIWA/TEA GARDENS They are built for tea ceremonies. Tea house is where the ceremonies occur, and the styles of both the hut and garden are based off the simple concepts There are stepping stones leading to the tea house, stone lanterns, and stone basins where guests purify themselves before a ceremony. The teahouse is screened by hedges to create a sense of remoteness
  28. 28. POCKET GARDENS These are mainly observed in the urban areas Easier to maintain than larger plots, the tiny patches are perfect for gardening, tight on room to perk up their patio.  Occupies less space. Can be applied anywhere Most popular in recent times
  29. 29. NON RECTILINEAR SHAPED WATER BODY ROCKS AND BOULDERS REPRESENTING MOUNTAINS POOL REPRESENT LAKES. RAKED SAND REPRESENT OCEAN.
  30. 30. Difference between Japanese and Chinese gardens Chinese Japan Architecture Building at the center of of garden Builing at any of the corner or to any end View Designed to view from inside Designed to view from out side Use Of Rock Rock is sculpted to large sculptures Placed in more natural arrangement Marine Landscape Inspired from inland lakes and water bodies Inspired from the coast and sea (pebble beach, Wight sand)
  31. 31. REFERENCE Wikipedia.com Japanese Gardens by Gunter Nitschke Slawson, David A. Secret Teachings in the Art of Japanese Gardens Yagi, Koji A Japanese Touch for Your Home japan-guide.com
  32. 32. THANK YOU ありがとう Anusha 45 Sai Yaswanth 46 Dinesh 48 Akash 50 Thabish 61 Pranaya 63 Pujutha 65 Pushpak 69 Santosh 79

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