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SLEEPING LION BUSINESS TOOLKIT 2019

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SLEEPING LION
BUSINESS TOOLKIT
“Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.”
Voltaire
SLEEPING LION
Don’t confuse movement with progress. It’s not about how busy you are, it’s about
effectiveness: avoiding th...
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Confusing movement with progress is pretty common in business – with people often running around like headless chickens. But it’s not about how busy you are, it’s about effectiveness: trying to avoid all the timewasting trivia and focusing on the important stuff.

A lion sleeps for over 18 hours day, and yet is still the undisputed king of the beasts. It is the master of minimal effort, maximum return. This is at the heart of the Sleeping Lion approach. For over 12 years, I have been advising companies on how to simplify and improve sales, marketing and business development – through consultancy, workshops and facilitation.

There are a range of tools and exercises available here that draw together Branding, Customer Loyalty, Marketing, Sales, People Development, Productivity, Idea Generation and Business Ethics – everything you need to focus and align your product, people and communication strategies. If you require help with any of these, I can run bespoke training sessions.

Confusing movement with progress is pretty common in business – with people often running around like headless chickens. But it’s not about how busy you are, it’s about effectiveness: trying to avoid all the timewasting trivia and focusing on the important stuff.

A lion sleeps for over 18 hours day, and yet is still the undisputed king of the beasts. It is the master of minimal effort, maximum return. This is at the heart of the Sleeping Lion approach. For over 12 years, I have been advising companies on how to simplify and improve sales, marketing and business development – through consultancy, workshops and facilitation.

There are a range of tools and exercises available here that draw together Branding, Customer Loyalty, Marketing, Sales, People Development, Productivity, Idea Generation and Business Ethics – everything you need to focus and align your product, people and communication strategies. If you require help with any of these, I can run bespoke training sessions.

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SLEEPING LION BUSINESS TOOLKIT 2019

  1. 1. SLEEPING LION BUSINESS TOOLKIT
  2. 2. “Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.” Voltaire
  3. 3. SLEEPING LION Don’t confuse movement with progress. It’s not about how busy you are, it’s about effectiveness: avoiding the timewasting trivia and focusing on the important stuff. A lion sleeps around 18 hours day, and yet is still the undisputed king of the beasts. It is the master of minimal effort, maximum return. Over the years I’ve tried to find ways to emulate this. Advising people on targeted business development – through consultancy, workshops and facilitation. I have picked up a range of interesting exercises and tools from a number of highly intelligent peers and great business writers. They cover: Branding, Customers, Marketing, Sales, People, Productivity, Ideas and Ethics. I can run bespoke training sessions in all of these areas, but my signature workshops are: Smart Business Development Sophisticated Sales Intelligent Marketing. For full details visit: sleepingliononline.com
  4. 4. “If you have a bad image and you are bad, then you don’t have an image problem.” Evan Davis
  5. 5. WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: FORWARD THINKING BRANDING How to get the basic elements right two: DEVELOPING A STRONG BRAND How to build a great brand three: DEVELOPING MARKET MAPS How to establish your current and future brand positioning four: ESTABLISHING BRAND PRINCIPLES How to work out what you are and what you are not five: THE BRAND BOMB How three simple questions can anchor your brand six: CREATING A BUSINESS MODEL AROUND YOUR VALUE PROPOSITION How to create products and services that people really want BRANDING
  6. 6. BRANDING INTRODUCTION: COMMON SENSE BRANDING Branding exercises range from super simplistic to thoroughly comprehensive - the choice is down to you and your style, and the stage your business is at. This section offers up some options - all of which I have used successfully with different clients. Branding can get a bit pretentious though, so I like this reminder from Jack Trout’s In Search of the Obvious to not lose sight of common sense. GET YOUR EGO OUT OF THE SITUATION Good judgement is based on reality. The more you screen things through your ego, the farther you get from reality. AVOID WISHFUL THINKING We all want things to go a certain way. But how things go is often out of our control. Good common sense tends to be in tune with the way things are going. BE BETTER AT LISTENING Common sense by definition is based on what others think. It’s thinking that is common to many. People who don’t have their ears to the ground lose access to important common sense. BE A LITTLE CYNICAL Things are sometimes the opposite of the way they really are. That’s often the case because someone is pursuing his or her own agenda. Good comon sense is based on the experience of many, not the wishful thinking of some.
  7. 7. one: FORWARD THINKING BRANDING How to get the basic elements right This is a quick and simple method from Marty Neumeier’s book Zag to sense check if you’ve got the key elements of your brand right. When focus is paired with differentiation, supported by a trend, and surrounded by compelling communication, you have the basic ingredients for a forward-thinking brand. EXERCISE: Complete the four sections below and challenge weak areas. COMMUNICATION DIFFERENCE TREND FOCUS D F T C Do you have true conviction? What makes you special? What trend are you riding? How well do you communicate? BRANDING
  8. 8. two: DEVELOPING A STRONG BRAND How to build a great brand This is a great tool to thoroughly work out what your brand’s all about. EXERCISE 1: In his excellent book Zag, Marty Neumeier outlines this comprehensive method to help develop a strong brand. The full exercise follows, but this one pager will really help start your thinking. 1. WHO ARE YOU? 2. WHAT DO YOU DO? 3. WHAT’S YOUR VISION? 4. WHAT WAVE ARE YOU RIDING? 9. WHO’S THE ENEMY? 10. HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN YOURSELF? 11. HOW DO YOU SPREAD THE WORD? 12. HOW DO PEOPLE ENGAGE WITH YOU?
  9. 9. BRANDING 5. WHO SHARES THE BRANDSCAPE? (MARKET MAP) 6. WHAT MAKES YOU THE ‘ONLY’? 7. WHAT SHOULD YOU ADD OR SUBTRACT? 8. WHO LOVES YOU? 13. WHAT DO THEY EXPERIENCE? 14. HOW DO YOU EARN THEIR LOYALTY? 15. HOW DO YOU EXTEND YOUR SUCCESS? 16. HOW DO YOU PROTECT YOUR PORTFOLIO?
  10. 10. two: DEVELOPING A STRONG BRAND - FULL VERSION How to build a great brand EXERCISE 2: This is the comprehensive brand building tool that takes you on the whole journey and helps you find your ‘uniqueness’ (or ‘onliness’ as it’s referred to in the book). 1. WHO ARE YOU? 2. WHAT DO YOU DO? 3. WHAT’S YOUR VISION? 4. WHAT WAVE ARE YOU RIDING? Where do you have the most credibility? Where do you have the most experience? Where does your passion lie? What business are you in? What do you want to accomplish in 5, 10 or 20 years? How can you make this vision exciting? What trend is powering your business? How powerful is it? Can you ride more than one trend at a time? Write a future obituary for your brand Decide what your purpose is, beyond selling a product or service State your purpose in 12 words or less Paint a vivid picture of your future Test it on a real piece of communication Use it repeatedly to illustrate the direction of your business Make a list of the trends that will power your success 9. WHO’S THE ENEMY? 10. HOW DO YOU EXPLAIN YOURSELF? 11. HOW DO YOU SPREAD THE WORD? 12. HOW DO PEOPLE ENGAGE WITH YOU? Which competitor can you paint as the enemy? What’s the one true statement you can make about your brand? How can you enroll brand advocates through messaging? How can you align all your comms with your Zag? What are you selling and how are you selling it? What are your touchpoints? Tell your customers what you’re not, in no uncertain terms Craft a trueline, that tells why your brand is compelling Avoid any commas or ‘ands’ Turn your trueline into a tag- line to use with customers Make sure your messaging is as different as your brand Only compete at the touchpoints where you can win Map your value proposition against those of your competitors See which competitive areas you can avoid entirely Discover customer touchpoints where you’ll be unopposed
  11. 11. 5. WHO SHARES THE BRANDSCAPE? 6. WHAT MAKES YOU THE ‘ONLY’? 7. WHAT SHOULD YOU ADD OR SUBTRACT? 8. WHO LOVES YOU? Who else competes in this category? Who comes first, second, and third in your customers’ mind? What’s the one thing that makes your brand both different and compelling? What existing brand elements are undermining your onliness? What new brand elements could stregthen this? Who makes up your brand community? How can you manage the ‘gives & gets’ so everyone is happy? Find out how your brand ranks with customers Design a strategy to become number one or two Or, become the first mover in a new category Complete a simple onliness statement Add detail by answering what, how, who, where, when, and why Make a list of all current and planned offerings and brand elements Decide which offerings to keep, sacrifice, or add Be brutal - it’s better to err on the side of sacrifice Diagram your brand’s ecosystem Decide how each participant will both contribute and benefit BRANDING 13. WHAT DO THEY EXPERIENCE? 14. HOW DO YOU EARN THEIR LOYALTY? 15. HOW DO YOU EXTEND YOUR SUCCESS? 16. HOW DO YOU PROTECT YOUR PORTFOLIO? How will customers learn about you? Where should you put your marketing resources? How can you help customers build barriers to competition? How can you avoid creating a ‘disloyalty’ programme? How do you keep growing the brand year after year? Map the customer journey from non-awareness to full enrollment Start by being loyal to your customers Give loyal customers the tools to introduce new customers Add extensions that reinforce the brand’s meaning Avoid extensions that unfocus the brand’s meaning How can the whole be worth more than the parts? How can you stay focused under short-term profit pressure? Avoid C-Sickness - Contagion, Confusion, Contradiction, and Complexity Understand the long-term effects of brand extensions
  12. 12. three: DEVELOPING MARKET MAPS How to establish your current and future brand positioning The Market Mapping tool is a highly effective and very flexible way to establish clarity and strategic authority when looking at any market. EXERCISE 1: Start by selecting two important factors in your market. For example, for restaurants this might be Price and Menu Complexity. Plot two overlapping axes and place your company plus your competitors on the grid. Use the results to identify gaps in the market, or significant overlaps. Being out on your own could be good, as it makes you distinctive in the market place. However, it could be what is known as ‘fool’s gold, white space’, meaning there’s no one else there because it’s not a good place to be! VARIABLE X HIGH VARIABLE Y HIGH VARIABLE Y LOW VARIABLE X LOW
  13. 13. BRANDING EXERCISE 2: This is particularly effective if you are looking to shift your brand positioning, as per this diagram. Plot where you are now and, more importantly, where you want to reposition your brand. VARIABLE X HIGH VARIABLE Y HIGH VARIABLE X LOW VARIABLE Y LOW COMPETITOR B COMPETITOR A COMPETITOR C COMPANY POSITION NOW DESIRED FUTURE POSITION
  14. 14. four: ESTABLISHING BRAND PRINCIPLES How to work out what you are and what you are not EXERCISE: Brand principles help distill the essence of a brand. First decide what your brand is all about and grade each of your brand principles to show a form of hierarchy. Then add what your brand anti-principles are (what your brand should NEVER become) - it is not as important to grade these. Thanks to Saint Design for first introducing me to this technique. BRAND X IS ……. I.e. Customer focused (5) Friendly (5) Straightforward (3) Funny (1) Authentic (4) BRAND X IS NOT ……. I.e. Selfish Arrogant Insipid Complicated
  15. 15. BRANDING five: THE BRAND BOMB How three simple questions can anchor your brand The BOMB acronym stands for Brisk Objective Methodology for Branding. It is extremely effective in defining in plain language what a company or brand stands for. EXERCISE: These three simple questions can reveal ‘diamonds in the dust’: things that you already do well but do not necessarily articulate or publicise. They are equally effective when asked of management, staff, and customers. WHAT WE ARE Describe what the company or brand is in less than 10 seconds e.g. We are: WHAT WE DO Describe what the company or brand does in less than 30 seconds e.g. We do/provide: WHAT WE ARE Describe what the company or brand is like to do business with in less than 30 seconds e.g. We describe ourselves as:
  16. 16. THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS Key Activities are the most important activities an organization needs to perform well. Key Resources are the most important assets required to offer and deliver the previously described elements. Customer Segments are the groups of people a company or organization aims to reach and create value for with a dedicated value proposition. Value Propositions are based on a bundle of products and services that create value for a customer segment. Customer Relationships describe the relationship with this customer segment - new (get), existing (keep) or cross-selling opportuntiy (grow). Channels describe how a value proposition is communicated and delivered to a customer segment through communication, distribution, and sales channels. Revenue Streams result from a value proposition successfully offered to a customer segment. It is how an organization captures value with a price that customers are willing to pay. Cost Structure describes all costs incurred to operate a business model. six: CREATING A BUSINESS MODEL AND VALUE PROPOSITION How to create products and services that people really want EXERCISE: Try using the Business Model Canvas to illustrate how your business creates, delivers and captures value (from Value Proposition Design - Oswalder & Pigneur).
  17. 17. Key Activities: What do we do? Value Proposition: Which one of our customer’s problems (or needs) are we helping to solve? What are the main features that match our customers needs? Customer Relationship: How will we Get, Keep + Grow customers? Customer Segments: Who are our customers? Key Resources: What resources or suppliers do we need? Channels: Through which marketing channels can we reach our customers? Cost Structure: What are our biggest costs? Revenue Streams: What are people prepared to pay for ? BRANDING
  18. 18. “We don’t see things as they are. We see them as we are.” Anais Nin
  19. 19. CUSTOMERS WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: CREATING PRODUCTS THAT MEET CUSTOMER NEEDS How to get the right product/customer fit two: CREATING CUSTOMER PROFILES How to understand your target customers better three: DEFINING WHAT CUSTOMER LOYALTY MEANS TO YOUR BRAND How to understand where your customers’ loyalty lies four: GAINING CUSTOMER INSIGHTS How to gain valuable customer insights five: CUSTOMER SATISFACTION BASICS How to get the basics right six: VALUING YOUR INVISIBLE CUSTOMERS How to identify real customer loyalty
  20. 20. CUSTOMERS INTRODUCTION: CUSTOMER LOYALTY STATISTICS How loyal are your customers? Probably not as much as you might like, which is the focus of this section. Here are some interesting stats to set the scene. • 80% of ‘satisfied’ customers will use a different supplier next time. • It is over 6 times more expensive to win a new customer than it is to persuade an existing customer to return. • 96% of unhappy customers won’t tell the organization about it. They’ll tell their friends instead. • News of bad customer experiences travels three times as fast as good news, and reaches 20 times as many people. • Prospective customers are over 3 times more likely to believe independent reviews as the company’s own marketing. Source: The Reputation Book, Arnold & Wood • Customers view only 20% of the companies they deal with as unique. • 60-80% of customers who defect were satisfied or very satisfied at the last survey. • 45% of people with something positive to say about a company tell 3 other people. 48% with negative things to say tell 10 people. • 57% of callers try to solve the problem themselves on the web, and 34% are on the website when they call. Source: The Effortless Experience, Dixon, Toman & Delisi
  21. 21. one: CREATING PRODUCTS THAT MEET CUSTOMER NEEDS How to get the right product/customer fit EXERCISE: This draws out two of the main segments from the Business Model Canvas (see Branding) and allows you to drill down and ensure your products/services (your Value Propositions) are properly designed to meet the needs of each of your customer segment profiles (i.e, product-customer fits). What are your customers looking to improve in their lives? What are your customers needs, what do they want? What pains and annoys your customers that you can help with? PAIN RELIEVERS GAIN CREATORS PRODUCTS + SERVICES GAINS CUSTOMER JOB(S) PAINS How do you improve your customers’ lives? What do you offer? How do you relieve customers’ pain? CUSTOMERS
  22. 22. two: CREATING CUSTOMER PROFILES How to understand your target customers better EXERCISE: First identify your different customer profiles (or target audiences), then use this tool to help you get into the mindset of each target group – matching them with the right product, understanding how best to reach them, and establishing what messaging will work best. ATTRIBUTES MOTIVATION/ ATTITUDES BRAND ASSOCIATIONS ATTITUDINAL PHRASES What am I like? What do I want/need? What do I read, wear, watch, eat? What brands do I associate with? How do I express my needs?
  23. 23. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MARKETING CHANNELS KEY DIFFERENTIATORS What products/services are we offering to meet these needs? What relationship do we have with this customer? How can we best reach/communicate with them? What makes us so special? CUSTOMERS
  24. 24. three: DEFINING WHAT CUSTOMER LOYALTY MEANS TO YOUR BRAND How to understand where your customers’ loyalty lies Customers can appear deceptively loyal but actually be uncommitted. It’s worth working out what else your customers could be ‘committed to’ and how fragile your current relationship is with your customers. EXERCISE: Use this tool to tick any boxes that might apply and make notes on how best to tackle this. PEOPLE I like (or know) a particular member of staff and will follow them if they move on. LOCATION You happen to be the nearest, but if someone opens up closer I would be open to switching allegiance. CONVENIENCE You deliver and no-one else (currently) does. PRICE I simply can’t afford the alternative (at the moment). HABIT I’ve always bought it, but habits can be broken. THIRD PARTY I’m actually not loyal to you, I’m loyal to a third party selling your product. LATEST TRENDS It’s cool right now (but probably won’t last). CELEBRITY CONNECTION If it’s good enough for Kim, ....... FEAR OF THE UNKNOWN I’m scared to try something new. OFFERS / PROMOTIONS Where’s the free gift? NOTES
  25. 25. four: GAINING CUSTOMER INSIGHTS How to gain valuable customer insights EXERCISE: Here are a range of methods to help understand your customers better, from Value Proposition Design by Osterwalder & Pigneur. THE IMPERSONATOR ‘Be your customer’ and use your products and services. Spend a day or more in your customer’s shoes. Difficulty level: ** THE CO-CREATOR Integrate customers into the process to learn from them. Work with customers to explore and develop new ideas. Difficulty level: ***** THE SCIENTIST Get customers to participate (knowingly or unknowingly) in an experiment. Learn from the outcome. Difficulty level: **** THE DATA DETECTIVE Build on existing work with (desk) research. Look at data outside your industry and study from a different context. Difficulty level: * THE JOURNALIST Talk to potential customers as an easy way to gain insights. Particularly when moving into a new geographical area. Difficulty level: ** THE ANTHROPOLOGIST Observe customers and potential customers in the real world to get good insights into how they behave. Difficulty level: *** CUSTOMERS
  26. 26. five: CUSTOMER SATISFACTION BASICS How to get the basics right A couple of great basics here from Exceptional Service, Exceptional Profit by Inghilleri & Solomon. EXERCISE 1: First a simple reminder of the four main elements of customer service (with an area to write your own notes). PERFECT PRODUCT CARING DELIVERY TIMELINESS EFFECTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING (SERVICE RECOVERY) EXERCISE 2: Plus five simple steps to great service recovery. APOLOGISE REVIEW THE COMPLAINT WITH THE CUSTOMER FIX THE PROBLEM DOCUMENT IT (TO STOP IT HAPPENING AGAIN) FOLLOW UP WITH THE CUSTOMER
  27. 27. CUSTOMERS six: VALUING YOUR INVISIBLE CUSTOMERS How to identify real customer loyalty Businesses tend to focus on ‘getting’ and ‘growing’ customers using a range of promotions and incentives to attract new business or encourage existing customers to buy more or introduce friends. But remember the ‘invisible’ customer who simply continues to loyally buy a certain product or service – they need rewards too if you want to keep them from becoming ex-customers. EXERCISE: First take a look at your current CRM data and add in numbers on the right hand side of the chart. Then write in the different incentives/rewards you are currently offering in each category. Are you offering anything to your invisible customer? PROSPECTS ACTIVE CUSTOMERS (REFERRALS / CROSS-BUYERS) INVISIBLE CUSTOMERS EX-CUSTOMERS BUSINESS IN BUSINESS OUT INCENTIVES/REWARDS FOR PROSPECTS TO BUY: INCENTIVES/REWARDS FOR ACTIVE CUSTOMERS: INCENTIVES/REWARDS FOR NON-ACTIVE CUSTOMERS: INCENTIVES/REWARDS FOR EX-CUSTOMERS TO RE-BUY: NUMBERSSTRATEGIES
  28. 28. “Little minds are interested in the extraordinary; great minds in the commonplace.” Elbert Hubbard
  29. 29. WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: GETTING, KEEPING + GROWING YOUR CUSTOMER BASE How to create separate strategies to get, keep and grow your customer base two: STRATEGY VS TACTICS How to separate tactics from initiatives three: MARKETING THROUGH THE RIGHT CHANNELS How to plan multi-channel marketing campaigns four: CREATING A STRATEGY WITH TACTICS & DIFFERENT CHANNELS How to build a monthly marketing plan five: PAID, EARNED, SHARED & OWNED MARKETING ASSETS How to use a smart mix of media six: CREATIVE BRIEFING How to write a creative brief MARKETING
  30. 30. MARKETING INTRODUCTION: BRINGING REALISM TO MARKETING INITIATIVES In an ideal world, all marketing would be thoroughly well planned, well in advance (as many of the following exercises will help with). However, in reality marketing initiatives are often a bit knee jerk or rushed. The If Triangle is a great realism tool when planning. In an ideal world we all want projects delivered quickly, cheaply, but still of the highest quality. This is, however, rarely realistic. For example, if your budget is limited, realistically, you may have to compromise on quality. If you need something created (or activated) super quick, you will inevitably need to pay more (or, again, compromise on quality). Working out what the priorities of each project are, and using this formula, will help on many levels – not least in explaining internally why all projects can’t always be ‘perfect’. COST cheap TIME fast QUALITY high IF
  31. 31. MARKETING one: GETTING, KEEPING + GROWING YOUR CUSTOMER BASE How to create separate strategies to get, keep and grow your customer base EXERCISE: A successful business needs robust strategies not just to win new customers but to maintain their loyalty and, ideally, grow their purchasing or influence. Use the boxes below to separate your marketing strategies into GET, KEEP or GROW initiatives - ensuring you have a balanced approach to activities. STRATEGIES TO GET CUSTOMERS Acquisition strategies STRATEGIES TO KEEP CUSTOMERS Retention strategies STRATEGIES TO GROW CUSTOMERS Cross-selling + referral strategies
  32. 32. two: STRATEGY VS TACTICS How to separate tactics from strategy One of the trickiest things businesses struggle with is the difference between strategy and tactics, and how to plan their shape. This tool helps to clarify matters. EXERCISE: The strategy is the overarching thought. This is the constant theme and direction that never varies, and against which all other activities can be judged and measured. The tactics are specific actions - examples or proof of the strategy - and their deployment must have a clear beginning and end. OVERARCHING THOUGHT (THE STRATEGY) EXAMPLES / INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES (TACTICS) TACTIC 1 TACTIC 2 TACTIC 3 TACTIC 4 GET, KEEP OR GROW?
  33. 33. MARKETING three: MARKETING THROUGH THE RIGHT CHANNELS How to plan multi-channel marketing campaigns EXERCISE: Marketing is all about getting the word out consistently through the most effective channels. Your strategy will have various tactical applications and these will fall within various marketing channels. Successful marketing campaigns need a complex mix of execution. DIRECT SALES SALES PROMOTION PRINT ADVERTISING SOCIAL MEDIA AFFILIATE MARKETING POINT OF SALE EMAIL MARKETING DIGITAL ADVERTISING REFERRAL MARKETING PR / BRAND STUNTS EVENTS SEO DIRECT MARKETING INFLUENCER MARKETING OVERARCHING THOUGHT (THE STRATEGY) GET, KEEP OR GROW?
  34. 34. four: CREATING A STRATEGY WITH TACTICS + DIFFERENT CHANNELS How to build a monthly marketing plan EXERCISE: For each of your main marketing strategies, start to build a month-by-month plan of individual tactics. MONTH: CHANNEL: INDIVIDUAL TACTICS CALL TO ACTION TARGET OUTCOME COSTS/ TOOLS CHANNEL: CHANNEL: CHANNEL: CHANNEL: OVERARCHING THOUGHT (THE STRATEGY) GET, KEEP OR GROW?
  35. 35. five: PAID, EARNED, SHARED & OWNED MARKETING ASSETS How to use a smart mix of media A smart mix of media will not only strengthen your marketing but can also help when managing tight marketing budgets. EXERCISE: Think about your digital marketing campaigns and your split of Paid, Earned, Shared & Owned media. PAID SHAREDEARNED OWNED Promoted Posts SEO, SEM, PPC, Google Ad words Likes, RTs, Shares Traditional advertising Social Media, WOM, referrals Website, Blog, Content Media relations, blogger relations, influencers Comprehensive mixed marketing strategy OWNED PAID SHARED EARNED SEO, SEM, PPC, GOOGLE ADWORDS PROMOTED POSTS LIKES, RETWEETS, SHARES MARKETING
  36. 36. six: CREATIVE BRIEFING How to write a creative brief EXERCISE: Use this framework to write a brief for your next marketing campaign - either for internal use or to help an external agency. REQUIREMENT What is needed? OBJECTIVE What is the communiction trying to achieve? TARGET AUDIENCE Who do we need to reach? COMPETITIVE CONTEXT What trends or background info are relevant? PROPOSITION What is the one thing we need to communicate?
  37. 37. SUPPORT Is there anything else that supports this claim? TONE OF VOICE In what style do we wish to say it? DESIRED RESPONSE What do we want to happen? HYGIENE FACTORS Is there anything compulsory? MARKETING
  38. 38. “There is nothing in a caterpillar to suggest a butterfly.” Superhero Bucky, Marvel Comics
  39. 39. SALES WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: VALUE POSITION How to present your value position succinctly two: ACTIVE LISTENING How to listen properly in order to sell effectively three: THE SALES HAMMOCK How to present clearly and effectively four: ESTABLISHING NEEDS How to correctly identify the needs of your clients five: BARRIERS TO PURCHASE How to overcome objections six: SALES TYPES How to find the best sales people
  40. 40. SALES INTRODUCTION: SOPHISTICATED SALES These days, sales often gets a bad rap. And sales people are seen as pushy and/or formulaic. But all products need to be sold and, even in our digital age, customers need additional human pursuasion. Often the more upmarket (or complex) the product, the greater the need is for a strong sales person to represent it. This section focuses on how to sell with flair and sophistication. You need to be part psychologist and be able to read your audience. WIFM stands for What’s In It For Me?. All sales people should consider this question in relation to the people to whom they are presenting. Know what motivates your potential customer, skip what doesn’t matter, make a conclusive proposal/pitch, and know when to ask for the sale. Character types and motivations vary. Adapt your style to suit the style of your potentail customer: RESULTS: don’t bore me with the details. Make snappy points. Talk results. EMOTIONS: show genuine interest in my feelings. Give me help and support. ABRACADABRA: give it some magic. Make it interesting and sparky. DATA: make research, facts and figures perfectly precise. Research shows that the sales experience contributes more to customer loyalty (53%) than the brand (19%), product and service delivery (19%), and value-to-price ratio (9%) put together, so it is really worth getting it right. Source:The Challenger Sale, Dixon & Adamson.
  41. 41. one: VALUE POSITION How to present your value position succinctly This is based on content from the book Conversations That Win The Complex Sale by Peterson & Riesterer. It’s a neat way to capture the three main components of an effective sales presentation. EXERCISE: Simply work through: what the customer (prospect) is looking for, what you are offering that matches this, and why it’s better than the competition. PROSPECT YOUR PRODUCT COMPETITIONVALUE POSITION IMPORTANT TO YOUR PROSPECT UNIQUE TO YOU DEFENSIBLE (AGAINST COMPETITION) WHAT’S IMPORTANT TO YOUR PROSPECT? WHAT ARE YOU OFFERING THAT’S UNIQUE TO MATCH WHAT’S IMPORTANT TO THE PROSPECT? HOW DOES THIS DIFFER FROM THE COMPETITION? SALES
  42. 42. two: ACTIVE LISTENING How to listen properly in order to sell effectively According to The Salesperson’s Secret Code (Mills, Ridley, Laker & Chapman), the most successful salespeople listen more than they speak, so that they fully understand what the client/customer is looking for (what their pain points are / where they can add value). Note: the words LISTEN and SILENT share the same letters. EXERCISE: Start by answering the following questions and giving yourself a score from 1 to 5 (1 = strongly disagree 2 = disagree 3 = neither agree nor disagree 4 = agree 5 = strongly agree). Then consider the 8 Ways to Become a Better Listener and write notes. Scored less than 20: Good work. Scored 20 - 30: You’re half paying attention, but could do a lot better - review the tips and make note of areas of improvement. Scored 30 - 40: You’re really not listening at all - review the tips and make note of areas of improvement. DREAMING. I am often thinking about something else while the client is talking ANSWER PREPARING. During conversations with clients, I am often waiting for a pause, so I can spit out an answer that I’m already preparing COMPULSIVE/IMPULSIVE. I often say something without thinking first, or to fill a silence AMBUSHING. I often fake listen to the client just so I can get in my comments JUDGING. I practise selective listening. I hear the things I want to hear based upon my own prejudices NOT FULLY PRESENT. I’m often unaware of the message the person is sending through body language and/or vocal intonation NOISE INDUCED STRESS. I often embark on a call or meeting when there is background noise in the environment to hinder my ability to listen COMPARING. I listen through filters, based on a past experience with another client 8 MISTAKES THAT LIMIT OUR ABILITY TO LISTEN SCALE 1 - 5 TOTAL SCORE
  43. 43. Encourage silence to show you are actively listening. Embrace pauses. Never interrupt when the client is speaking. Be present. Put down your electronic equipment. Make the client feel heard. with such com- ments as. “What I’m hearing is…” or “Tell me more.” Become a solution-oriented listener. Listen for the intended solution more than for problems. Listen for what is not being said. Find the meaning behind the words. Resist the temptation to rebut. Don’t argue. Listen for information you can use. 8 WAYS TO BECOME A BETTER LISTENER NOTES SALES
  44. 44. three: THE SALES HAMMOCK How to present clearly and effectively The book Conversations That Win The Complex Sale by Peterson & Riesterer also outlines research that shows that people remember 70% of the words at the beginning of a presention, 20% in the middle, and 100% at the end. This is illustrated in The Sales Hammock, reminding us to pitch accordingly. Put your best bits first and last, use strong visuals, simplicity and proof, and make it personal. Most importantly, keep it short (especially the bit in the middle). EXERCISE: Use this hammock system to plan the content of your next sales presentation - focusing on the beginning and end. BEGINNING MIDDLE
  45. 45. 20% RETENTION70% RETENTION 100% RETENTION BED OF NAILS END SALES
  46. 46. four: ESTABLISHING NEEDS How to correctly identify the needs of your clients/customers It is essential to establish the need thoroughly and to educate the client to the best buying solution, especially when selling expensive, added value solutions. There are only two reasons for buying anything: - to make a gain (opportunity +) - to avoid a loss (implication -) EXERCISE: Use this to work through what you’ve picked up regarding the customer’s needs and then summarise as a TRUE NEED. STATED NEED The customer’s perception of their own requirements, often expressed as a commodity to be provided by the cheapest vendor HIDDEN NEED Unmentioned by the client but quickly evident to the seller IMPLIED NEED Vague and underdeveloped ideas often mentioned in conversation, not always thought through TRUE NEED The sum of all the others
  47. 47. five: BARRIERS TO PURCHASE How to overcome objections Understanding potential objections or barriers to purchase is an important part of sales preparation. Anticipating these and proactively planning a response will help eliminate them in a live sales environment. EXERCISE: Use the Barriers to Purchase Axis to prepare for potentials objections. Put yourself in the shoes of the customer or colleague you wish to persuade, and map out all their likely objections. This provides the basis for your sales pitch and shows the evidence you may need to provide to effectively make your case. NOT INTERESTED VERY INTERESTED 1 5432 BARRIER 1: BARRIER 2: BARRIER 3: BARRIER 4: BARRIER 5: SALES
  48. 48. six: SALES TYPES How to find the best sales people We normally associate sales people with being Extraverts, but research acquired by Daniel Pink and published in his book To Sell Is Human, tells another story. It shows that the best sales people are neither Introverts or Extraverts, they are Ambiverts - a bit of each. EXERCISE 1: Where would you plot yourself (or your team) on this chart? Depending on where you sit, consider some behavourial change for better results (see boxes below). REVENUE EXTRAVERSION Source: Adam Grant, University of Pennsylvania LOW HIGH HIGH “AMBIVERTS” TOO INTROVERT? CONSIDER WAYS TO TURN IT UP TOO EXTRAVERT? CONSIDER WAYS TO TONE IT DOWN
  49. 49. According to The Challenger Sale by Dixon & Adamson, the best sales people don’t just build relationships with customers, they challenge them. They tailor their message to each customer, they are assertive (not aggressive), and they push back where necessary to take control of the sale. They are particularly effective in complex sales scenarios. In fact, the more complex the sale, the more successful challangers are (see histogram below). EXERCISE 2: Where do you (or your team) currently sit? Should you be looking at adopting more assertive techniques or employing more challengers? RB: 4% PS: 7% HW: 10% LW: 25% C: 54% RB: 11% PS: 18% HW: 26% LW: 25% C: 20% LOW HIGH SUCCESS IN LOW VS HIGH COMPLEXITY SELLING THE LONE WOLF Follows own instincts Self-assured Difficult to control THE PROBLEM SOLVER Reliably responds to internal and external stakeholders Ensures that all problems are solved Detail-orientated THE CHALLENGER Always has a different view of the world Understands the customer’s business Loves to debate Pushes the customer THE HARD WORKER Always willing to go the extra mile Doesn’t give up easily Self-motivated Interested in feedback and development THE RELATIONSHIP BUILDER Builds strong advocates in cus- tomer organisation Generous in giving time to help others Gets along with everyone SALES
  50. 50. “Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.” Arthur Schopenhauer
  51. 51. PEOPLE WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: CREATING A GREAT COMPANY CULTURE How to improve your company culture two: IMPROVING DYSFUNCTIONAL TEAMS How to recognise elements of good and bad teams three: THE IDEAL TEAM PLAYER How to recognise the qualities of an ideal team player four: PERSONAL MOTIVATION How to understand your people better five: MOTIVATING MAVERICKS How to get the best out of your exceptionally bright stars six: ESTABLISHING HOW STRONG YOUR COMPANY CULTURE IS How to design a great staff survey
  52. 52. PEOPLE INTRODUCTION: MULTICULTURAL TEAMS This section focuses on building great teams and good company cultures. Being culturally aware is particularly interesting in multinational organisations and indeed for anyone dealing with other nationalities. Richard Lewis’s book, When Cultures Collide, features a model of cultural variations. LINEAR-ACTIVE = cool, factual, decisive planner MULTI-ACTIVE = warm, emotional, impulsive REACTIVE = courteous, amiable, accomodating, compromiser MULTI- ACTIVE REACTIVE LINEAR- ACTIVE Brazil, Chile Sub-Saharan Africa Saudi Arabia, Arab countries Iran, Turkey India Indonesia, Malaysia Korea, Thailand China Vietnam Argentina, Mexico Italy, Portugal, Spain, Greece Russia, Slovakia France, Poland Belgium Australia, Denmark, Ireland Austria, Netherlands, Norway USA Germany, Switzerland UK Sweden Finland Canada SingaporeHongKong Taiwan Japan
  53. 53. one: CREATING A GREAT COMPANY CULTURE How to improve your company culture Here are some great reminders of what makes a good company culture, from Why Should Anyone Work Here? by Goffee & Jones (a full staff survey example is also included in section six). EXERCISE: Work through these six areas and make notes on your own company’s strengths and weaknesses. DIFFERENCE: Does the company let people be themselves? RADICAL HONESTY: Does the company let people know what’s really going on? EXTRA VALUE: Does the company magnify peoples’ strengths? AUTHENTICITY: Does the company stand for something more than just shareholder value? MEANING: Does the company make the work make sense? SIMPLE RULES: Does the company make the rules clear and apply them equally to everyone? PEOPLE Yes / No Yes / NoYes / NoYes / No Yes / NoYes / No
  54. 54. two: IMPROVING DYSFUNCTIONAL TEAMS How to recognise elements of good and bad teams There are five dysfunctions that can ruin the effectiveness and cohesion of any team (as outlined in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni). Each builds on the previous, making it even more difficult to isolate just one issue in a team. 1. Absence of trust. Teams that are not open about mistakes and weaknesses make it impossible to build trust. 2. Fear of conflict. Teams that lack trust are incapable of engaging in unfiltered debate. Instead they resort to veiled discussions and guarded comments. 3. Lack of commitment. Without having aired their opinions in open debate, team members rarely, if ever, buy in or commit to decisions. 4. Avoidance of accountability. Without committing to a clear plan of action, even the most focused people fail to call their peers to account. 5. Inattention to results. Failure to hold one another accountable creates an environment where team members put their individual needs above the team. • Trust comes from overcoming invulnerability and admitting to weaknesses. • Constructive conflict needs to replace artificial harmony. • Creating commitment means removing ambiguity. • Accountability involves raising low standards. • Inattention to results can be addressed by removing status and ego issues.
  55. 55. = Status and Ego Absence of Trust Fear of Conflict Lack of Commitment Avoidance of Accountability Inattention to Results = Low Standards = Ambiguity = Artificial Harmony = Invulnerability SCORE: SCORE: SCORE: SCORE: SCORE: EXERCISE: Starting at the bottom of the pyramid (Absense of Trust) first rate your team (out of ten) in each of the five areas. Then discuss with the team a plan to address specific issues. NOTES: PEOPLE
  56. 56. three: THE IDEAL TEAM PLAYER How to recognise the qualities of an ideal team player As outlined by Patrick Lencioni, there are three essential virtues that make someone The Ideal Team Player: being humble, hungry and smart. - Humble: humility is the single greatest and most indispensable attribute. - Hungry: these people are self-motivated and diligent. - Smart: these people demonstrate common sense when dealing with others - social rather than academic intelligence. Things start getting interesting when you look at people with only one or two of the attributes. Those with just one are fairly easy to spot: - Humble only: the pawn, who often gets left out. - Hungry only: the bulldozer, who often annoys everyone else. - Smart only: the charmer, with great social skills but low contribution. Those with 2 out of 3 are much harder to spot: - Humble and hungry: the accidental mess-maker, unaware of their effect on other people. - Humble and smart: the lovable slacker, only does as much as asked. - Hungry and smart: the skilful politician, out for their own benefit.  
  57. 57. EXERCISE: Consider the attributes of your team members and place them in the appropriate category. Review the mix and consider action. Anyone with all three qualities is ideal. Those with fewer can also be valuable so long as the overall blend in the team covers all three qualities comprehensively. THE IDEAL TEAM PLAYER The BulldozerThe Pawn The Charmer The Accidental Mess-maker SMART HUMBLE HUNGRY The Skillful Politician The Loveable Slacker NOTES: PEOPLE
  58. 58. four: PERSONAL MOTIVATION How to understand your people better Nothing gets done if no one can be bothered. And that means that motivation has to be effective, with everybody working at a consistently high level. That’s easier said than done. In his book Drive, Daniel Pink boiled the essence of motivation down to three crucial elements. Autonomy is the desire to direct our own lives. Mastery is the urge to get better and better at something that matters. Purpose is the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves. The people involved in enacting an idea need ample quantities of these characteristics if there is to be a reasonable chance of it happening. EXERCISE: Use this motivational tool to work out if your team has the desire, the skill, and the sense of purpose to make it happen. PURPOSE AUTONOMY MASTERY = MOTIVATION PURPOSE MASTERY AUTONOMY
  59. 59. five: MOTIVATING MAVERICKS How to get the best out of your exceptionally bright stars You need a particularly astute approach to leading smart, creative people. Research shows that a handful of star performers create disproportionate amounts of value for their organisations, as described in Goffee & Jones’s book Clever. These invaluable individuals are called ‘clevers’, and although they can be brilliant, they can also be difficult. Their cleverness is central to their identity; their skills are not easily replicated; they know their worth; they ask difficult questions; they are organisationally savvy; they are not impressed by hierarchy; they expect instant success; they want to be connected to other clever people; and they won’t thank you. Even worse, they take pleasure in breaking the rules, trivialising the importance of non-technical people, they are oversensitive about their projects, and are never happy about the review process. So traditional leadership approaches won’t be effective. Instead, bosses need to tell them what to do (not how to do it), earn their respect with expertise (not pull rank with a job title), and provide ‘organised space’ for their creativity. EXERCISE: Do you have mavericks in your team? Are your actions motivating? earn their respect with expertise, not a job title DO ...... DO NOT ...... use hierarchy tell them what you want done tell them how to do it provide boundaries - organised space for creativity create bureaucracy give them time interfere give them recognition (amplify their achievements) give frequent feedback encourage failure and maximise learning train by rote (they are already highly skilled) talk straight use bull or intentionally deceive NOTES NOTES PEOPLE
  60. 60. six: ESTABLISHING HOW STRONG YOUR COMPANY CULTURE IS How to design a great staff survey EXERCISE: A great template for surveying staff from Havard Business Review. Where are you strongest? Where do you need to improve? Where is the best place to start? Where will you need to make a trade-off? I am the same person at home as I am at work I am comfortable being myself We are all encouraged to express our differences People who think differently from most do well here Passion is encouraged, even when it leads to conflict More than one type of person fits here We are told the real story Information is not manipulated It is not disloyal to say something negative My manager wants to hear bad news Many channels of communication are available to us IfeelcomfortablesigningmynametocommentsImake 1 = strongly disagree 2 = disagree 3 = neither agree nor disagree 4 = agree 5 = strongly agree DIFFERENCE: I can be myself here RADICAL HONESTY: I am told what is really going on AREA TOTAL AREA TOTAL
  61. 61. I know what we stand for I value what we stand for I want to exceed my current duties Profit is not our overriding goal I am accomplishing something worthwhile I like to tell people where I work I am given a chance to develop Every employee is given the chance to develop The best people want to perform here The weakest performers can see a path to improvement Compensationisfairlydistributedthroughouttheorganisation Wegeneratevalueforourselvesbyaddingvaluetoothers AUTHENTICITY: I am proud of where we’re coming from and what we stand for EXTRA VALUE: My strengths are magnified My job is meaningful to me My duties makes sense to me My work gives me energy and pleasure I understand how my job fits with everyone else’s Everyone’s job is necessary At work we share a common cause We keep things simple The rules are clear and apply equally to everyone I know what the rules are for Everyone knows what the rules are for We, as an organisation, resist unnecessary rules + paperwork Authority is respected MEANING: The work makes sense SIMPLE RULES: I believe in the rules ANY ITEM SCORING 1 OR 2 IS WORTH ATTENTION. ANY AREA WITH AN OVERALL SCORE BELOW 18 SUGGESTS THIS AREA REQUIRES IMPROVEMENT. PEOPLE AREA TOTAL AREA TOTAL AREA TOTAL AREA TOTAL
  62. 62. “Time is a created thing. To say, “I don’t have time,” is to say “I don’t want to.” Lao Tzu
  63. 63. PRODUCTIVITY WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: CIRCLE OF CONCERN How to focus on the stuff you can control two: ESSENTIALISM How to channel your energy three: THE PRIORITY MATRIX How to better manage your time four: THE POWER OF LESS How to get into the habit of doing less five: BAR CODE DAY How to better manage your time six: GETTING THINGS DONE How to manage your workflow
  64. 64. PRODUCTIVITY INTRODUCTION: SMALL HABITS - BIG CHANGES There are many books on improving your productivity. This section features just a few of my favourite exercises. But first, here are a couple of little gems that can make a big initial difference. THE 20 MILE MARCH Polar explorer Roald Amundsen beat Captain Scott to the South Pole by consistently marching 20 miles a day. He had worked out in advance that 20 miles was the optimum amount for a team with their equipment. In bad weather the team did it anyway, and in good weather they stopped at 20 to save energy for the next day. Scott’s team either either stayed in their tents on bad days or overshot on good ones and wore themselves out. The moral is that companies, teams and individuals should aim for similar consistency in order to be truly productive. PING PONG RING Making decent decisions is really hard if you can’t concentrate properly. You need to remove yourself from distractions to work out what to do. These days, most of these distractions come from technology - often too many emails. In his book Too Fast To Think, Chris Lewis references Vanessa Brady, a multi-award winning interior designer. If two emails have failed to solve a problem, her approach is: ‘PING PONG RING’. The moral is that when an email conversation is getting long and out of control, break the deadlock with a call (and avoid further distraction). BIG ROCKS A Stephen Covey classic. This is featured in his 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (more exercises from this to follow). Imagine your time like a glass or vase. If you put sand and small pebbles in first, you will never fit in the big rocks. But if you put the big rocks in first, then there will still be room for the small pebbles and sand to fit in around. The moral is to get the big stuff done first.
  65. 65. one: CIRCLE OF CONCERN How to focus on the stuff you can control We so often waste our time and energy on things we cannot control (external factors). This exercise, from Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, helps us focus on the important items that are within our sphere of influence. EXERCISE: Write a list of things that are on your mind and place them in the relevant areas of the circle. If they fall in the outer ring, you need to accept that you cannot control them and therefore you are better off moving on and saving your energy for items in the middle circle. CIRCLE OF CONCERN Things you CANNOT control or influence CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE Things you CAN control or influence CONCERN INFLUENCE PRODUCTIVITY
  66. 66. two: ESSENTIALISM How to channel your energy In his book Essentialism, Greg McKeown brilliantly identifies the differences between essentialists and non-essentialists. The non-essentialist is all things to all people and pursues everything in an undisciplined way. The non-essentialist thinks that almost everything is essential. The essentialist, however, does less but better. When it comes to energy, instead of doing many things half-heartedly, do one or two things properly. In both cases, the same amount of energy is exerted. It’s the difference between a millimetre of progress in a million directions and significant progress in what matters most. NON-ESSENTIALIST ESSENTIALIST ALL THINGS TO ALL PEOPLE “I have to” “It’s all important” “How can I fit it all in?” THE UNDISCIPLINED PURSUIT OF MORE Reacts to what’s most pressing Says “yes” to people without really thinking Tries to force execution at the last moment LIVES A LIFE THAT DOES NOT SATISFY Takes on too much, and work suffers Feels out of control Is unsure of whether the right things get done Feels overwhelmed and exhausted LESS BUT BETTER “I choose to” “Only a few things really matter” “What are the trade-offs?” THE DISCIPLINED PURSUIT OF LESS Pauses to discern what really matters Says “no” to everything except the essential Removes obstacles to make execution easy LIVES A LIFE THAT REALLY MATTERS Chooses carefully in order to do great work Feels in control Gets the right things done Experiences joy in the journey THINKS DOES GETS
  67. 67. TO DO LIST ESSENTIAL (do now) NON-ESSENTIAL (ditch or delay) PRODUCTIVITY EXERCISE: Review your to do list. Identify one or two items to prioritise, and delay or ditch the others.
  68. 68. three: THE PRIORITY MATRIX How to better manage your time EXERCISE: Another technique from Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. This matrix is great for prioritising your to do list. URGENT NOT URGENT IMPORTANTNOTIMPORTANT THINK + PLANPRIORITIES IGNORE OR CANCELDELEGATE OR DO FIRST (QUICKLY)
  69. 69. PRODUCTIVITY four: THE POWER OF LESS How to get into the habit of doing less In his book The Power of Less, Leo Babauta outlines his six essential productivity principles that ‘will change your life’. 1. Set limitations. 2. Choose the essential. 3. Simplify. 4. Focus. 5. Create habits. 6. Start small. Here’s a checklist of his recommended habits. EXERCISE: How many of the following are you currently doing? Set your 3 MITs (Most Important Tasks) each morning. Single-task. When you work on a task, don’t switch to other tasks. Process your inbox to empty. Check email just twice a day. Work while disconnected, with no distractions. Follow a morning routine. Eat more fruits and veggies every day. Keep your desk decluttered. Say no to commitments and requests that aren’t on your short list. Declutter your house for 15 minutes a day. Exercise five to ten minutes a day. Stick to a five-sentence limit for emails.
  70. 70. five: BAR CODE DAY How to better manage your time The bar code provides a visual depiction of a day filled with hundreds of short, bitty tasks. This is not always the choice of the person doing the work, it’s because they keep being interrupted. When that happens it takes the average person 12 to 15 minutes to get back to doing what they were doing. So if they are disturbed more than four times an hour, they have lost their whole career. Studies show that multitasking doesn’t work. If you want to produce proper high quality work, you need to allocate a decent run of time for each task or project, without interruption. EXERCISE: Use the chart to properly plan your day (and turn off easy distractions like email alerts and your mobile phone). 9am ------ 1pm ------ 6pm 9am ------ 1pm ------ 6pm 9am ------------------------------------------- 1pm ------------------------------------------ 6pm PROJECT : PROJECT : PROJECT : PROJECT : MORNINGPLANNING EMAILCHECK/CALLS LUNCH EMAILCHECK/CALLS REVIEW/WRAPUP
  71. 71. PRODUCTIVITY six: GETTING THINGS DONE How to manage your workflow Here’s a useful workflow chart based on David Allen’s Getting Things Done - how to achieve stress-free productivity. EXERCISE: Take your current to do list and work through the process. To Do Do it NOW Delegate Defer (by date) File it Ditch it TO DO LIST Is it actionable? YES Will it take less than 2 minutes? Yes No Do it NOW Delegate it Defer it NO Schedule it (to do by a specific time) Ditch it File it for reference
  72. 72. “It’s better to fail in originality, than succeed in imitation.” Herman Melville
  73. 73. IDEAS WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: THREE GOOD / THREE BAD How to deal with negativity two: CHANGING THE GAME How to effectively classify your brainstorming ideas three: CATEGORY STEALING How to get inspiration from a wider field four: CENTRAL IDEA SATELLITE SYSTEM How to build on a good idea five: EYES OF EXPERTS How to harness the power of experts six: THE FOUR CORNER WALKABOUT How to build on good ideas
  74. 74. IDEAS INTRODUCTION: RULES OF ENGAGEMENT + THE RIGHT STIMULUS This section is all about brainstorming and generating interesting and innovative ideas for your business. Before we dive into the exercises, here are some tips on how to facilitate a succesful session. It is important to get the attitude of attendees right, and that means setting the right tone. It’s a good idea to create Rules of Engagement that reflect your company culture. Freewheeling, impractical ideas are as useless as the immediate killing off of every new suggestion. The onus is on the person running the session to break it down into the smallest possible chunks and ensure that the Right Stimulus is introduced at the right time. Exercises, practical application of what has been discussed, and group work can all lead to faster ideas, so long as they are not trivial or allowed to spiral out of control (either off brief, or for too long). BREAK WITH THE PAST PRODUCTIVE LISTENING BREVITY = INTELLIGENCE TAKE ISSUES SERIOUSLY, BUT NOT YOURSELF NO SHOW, NO SAY NO JARGON NO SHOWBOATING NO CYNICS VARIETY VISUALS PREPARATIONEXERCISES RULES OF ENGAGEMENT THE RIGHT STIMULUS BREAKS
  75. 75. one: THREE GOOD / THREE BAD How to deal with negativity Many idea sessions are derailed by negative material and attitude. It only takes one moaner and the whole thing can veer off in an unwanted direction. If you believe this is a possibility, then the Three Good, Three Bad tool is excellent for combatting it. Instead of allowing negative comment to creep in to proceedings, the technique deliberately seeks out the bad stuff, deals with it early, and offsets it with good stuff. This is sometimes called the car park – a place where all the negativity is parked. EXERCISE: All attendees are asked to write down three bad things about the product/project/initiative, and then three good. This draws the sting out of all negative comment. The results are reviewed and summarised by the facilitator. Usually there is a significant overlap, and there is much to be learned about the degree of consensus, or an absolute focus on just one deficiency. If the number of good points outweigh the bad, concentrate on those. If the bad points outweigh the good, make the objective of the project to improve or rectify them. The exercise should always be done first, and should never last more than an hour, or 20% of the meeting time. All the good features are then used as inspiration to go on to provide an excellent solution. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. GOOD BAD IDEAS
  76. 76. two: CHANGING THE GAME How to effectively classify your brainstorming ideas The Three Buckets exercise was introduced by Adam Morgan in his book The Pirate Inside. It is an extremely helpful way to categorise ideas or projects and work out how effective they are likely to be. Each idea must be placed in one of the three buckets. On the left is Brilliant Basics. These represent ‘excellence as standard’. You or your company should be doing these well as a matter of course, just like your competitors. In the middle is Compelling Difference. These should be ‘significantly better than normal’. These are demonstrably better than your competitors, but not geninely remarkable. On the right is Changing the Game. These are ‘truly extraordinary’. They are utterly distinctive in the market, and genuinely remarkable. EXERCISE: This exercise will reveal whether a sufficient proportion of your initiatives are going to make a genuine difference to your business. Vote collectively or place each idea or project into one of the three buckets. If everything, or too many, are in Brilliant Basics, think harder to generate more exciting ones. BRILLIANT BASICS COMPELLING DIFFERENCE CHANGING THE GAME
  77. 77. three: CATEGORY STEALING How to get inspiration from a wider field The principle of Category Stealing is simple: choose a category different to your own and ask how they would approach your issue. Everyone operates in one category or another, and many of the traditions, rituals and formats in them operate in quite fixed ways. This can lead to sameness in one sector, but could provide inspiration in another. EXERCISE: Start by listing a number of other categories like Automotive, Banking, Technology, Pharmaceuticals. If you need reminding, scan the share prices in a newspaper, search online, or watch the TV for an evening. Identify the characteristics of well-defined ones, such as their usual approach to finance, branding, distribution, price, product features, and so on. Then work out what you can steal to apply to your brand. If a whole category doesn’t have clearly defined traits, then take one brand instead that does. For example, how would Apple or Coke do this? IDEAS TO STEAL: CATEGORY: GATEGORY: CATEGORY: CATEGORY: IDEAS TO STEAL: IDEAS TO STEAL: IDEAS TO STEAL: IDEAS
  78. 78. four: CENTRAL IDEA SATELLITE SYSTEM How to build on a good idea This system is very effective at demonstrating whether an idea or initiative has significant scope or not. EXERCISE: The central idea should be placed in the centre circle. This should ideally be one word, or a short statement. Then you need to draw up a list of related sub-themes or ideas that support the central initiative. They can be variations on the theme, or different media through which it can be expressed, or different audiences receiving the message, and so on - so long as all the orbiting thoughts are cousins in some way. This diagram looks simple enough, but it is not as easy as it looks to fill in. The satellites must be properly anchored themes that truly dramatise the fertility of the central idea. If they do not, then either choose ones that do or, in extreme cases, throw out the central idea in favour of one with greater scope. CENTRAL IDEA .................................. SUB IDEA 1 SUB IDEA 2 SUB IDEA 3 SUB IDEA 4 SUB IDEA 5 SUB IDEA 6 SUB IDEA 7 SUB IDEA 8
  79. 79. five: EYES OF EXPERTS How to harness the power of experts This is a charming and fun technique that really works, regardless of the topic. The idea is to view the challenge through the eyes of a known person who is very successful at something i.e. successful businessman (Richard Branson), a sportsman (David Beckham), and a universally known political figure (Nelson Mandela). It is not essential that they are technically expert, but it is important that they have a reputation for approaching their task in a distinctive way. EXERCISE: The list of experts can be decided before the session, or generated spontaneously by the group. Examine a challenge using the style and viewpoint of each expert. This can either be done collectively (all attendees imagining one expert at the same time), or separately (sending pairs or mini-groups off to work through the eyes of several different ones). EXPERT: APPROACH: EXPERT: EXPERT: APPROACH: APPROACH: IDEAS
  80. 80. six: THE FOUR CORNER WALKABOUT How to build on good ideas This technique is easy and almost always surprising. EXERCISE: First, you need a room large enough to allow your participants to walk around. Then take four large sheets of flip chart paper. Choose four strategic areas that are relevant to the challenge and write one only on each sheet. Place each sheet in a different corner of the room. Give your first attendee a marker pen, send them to a corner, and ask them to write the first thought they come up with next to the original idea. They then move on to the next corner, and another attendee is sent to add to their thought. Keep sending everyone round, each building on what has gone before until each sheet is full. This technique achieves three things: • Lateral departures that are intrinsically linked to the original idea/s. • Surprise and stimulation for the attendees when they see the ways in which their ideas can be built upon by others to generate something more powerful. • People have better ideas when they are on the move.
  81. 81. IDEAS STRATEGIC AREA 1: STRATEGIC AREA 2: STRATEGIC AREA 4: STRATEGIC AREA 3:
  82. 82. “My idea of man’s chief end was to enrich the world with things of beauty and have a fairly good time myself while doing so.” Robert Louis Stevenson
  83. 83. ETHICS WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES: one: WORKING OUT WHY YOUR BUSINESS EXISTS How to use the Golden Circle principle to start getting your priorities right two: DEFINING YOUR COMPANY’S ESSENTIAL INTENT How to distinguish between a bland set of values and an inspirational and concrete objective three: WHAT DOES ‘GREEN’ MEAN? How to start creating a green business four: THE 12 PRINCIPLES OF ETHICAL BUSINESS PRACTICE How to form the basis of business ethics five: THE GREEN MARKETING CHECKLIST How to ensure credibility for your green marketing claims six: CREATING ETHICAL MARKETING PRINCIPLES How to understand the principles of ethical marketing
  84. 84. ETHICS INTRODUCTION: CORPORATE ETHICAL COMMITMENT Modern companies should embrace the powerful ethical dimension of corporate leadership, as outlined in Pringle & Gordon’s book Brand Manners. Customers, employees, government, pressure groups, journalists and opinion formers, suppliers, alliance partners, consumers - all of the stakeholders in a company are increasingly concerned with its position in the community. They question the contribution it is making to society, not just in the usual terms of profit and loss, but in the much wider sense of what it is putting back (in relation to what it is taking out). Hence the rise in importance of social and community programmes, company-sponsored volunteering schemes and cause-related or social marketing campaigns. But truly ethical companies understand that this integrity needs to run through the entire organisation. Without effective internal communication, principles can easily weaken in the face of day to day reality, as this diagram from the book nicely illustrates. Board Middle Managers First-line Supervisors Work Teams Senior Managers CORPORATE ETHICAL COMMITMENT AGREE COMPROMISE IGNORE ACCEPT RECEIVE COMMIT (enthusiasts) COMPLY COMDEMN (cynics)
  85. 85. one: WORKING OUT WHY YOUR BUSINESS EXISTS How to use the Golden Circle principle to start getting your priorities right This comes from Simon Sinek’s highly successful book, Start With Why. Most companies start by working out what they do, then work out how. They often don’t get onto the ‘why’. It’s more effective to start with why, then move onto the how and what. WHAT Every organisation on the planet knows WHAT they do. These are products they sell or the services they offer. HOW Some organisations know HOW they do it. These are the things that make them special or set them apart from their competition. WHY Very few organisations know WHY they do what they do. WHY is not about making money. That’s a result. It’s a purpose, cause or belief. It’s the very reason your organisation exists. EXERCISE: First write down WHAT your company does in the outer circle. Then write in HOW you are special in the middle circle. Finally, consider WHY you exist and what your essential purpose is. WHAT HOW WHY ETHICS
  86. 86. two: DEFINING YOUR COMPANY’S ESSENTIAL INTENT How to distinguish between a bland set of values and an inspirational and concrete objective The idea of developing a company’s essential intent comes from Greg McKeown’s Essentialism. In the top left quadrant, there are vision and mission statements that sound inspirational but are so general that they are almost always ignored. In the bottom left is a set of vague general values that are usually too bland or generic to inspire any passion. Bottom right are shorter-term quarterly objectives - certainly clear and concrete but not very inspiring. The essential intent (top right) must be both inspirational and concrete - one decision that eliminates a thousand later ones. EXERCISE: Write your Essential Intent Statement. The test for ensuring that it is concrete as well as inspirational is to answer the question: How will we know when we’re done? BLANDINSPIRATIONAL GENERAL CONCRETE Vision / Mission ESSENTIAL INTENT Makes one decision that eliminates 1000 later decisions Values Quarterly Objectives COMPANY ESSENTIAL INTENT STATEMENT
  87. 87. three: WHAT DOES ‘GREEN’ MEAN? How to start creating a green business If you are just starting out on a road to a greener business, this can help understand the many areas you will need to consider (from Ottman’s The New Rules of Green Marketing). EXERCISE: Write down examples of applicable green behaviour in your business now and where you can improve. RAW MATERIALS Sustainably harvested, Biobased, Fair trade PACKAGING Recycled, Non-aerosol Minimal DISTRIBUTION Fuel-efficient, Local Reusable packaging MARKETING Ethical, Cause-related Transparent IN-USE Low-fume, Resource-efficient Durable AFTER-USE Recyclable, Refillable Reusable DISPOSAL Landfill-safe, Compostable Biodegradable MANUFACTURING/ PRODUCTION Socially responsible, Low carbon footprint, Pesticide-free, Unbleached NOWFUTURENOWFUTURE ETHICS
  88. 88. four: 12 PRINCIPLES OF ETHICAL BUSINESS PRACTICE How to form the basis of good business ethics EXERCISE: Can you provide evidence of good ethical practice in your business for each of these areas? HONESTY OBEYING THE LAW RESPECT CARINGFAIRNESSLOYALTYKEEPING PROMISES INTEGRITY EXCELLENCE LEADERSHIP MORALE BUILDING ACCOUNTABILITY
  89. 89. five: THE GREEN MARKETING CHECKLIST How to ensure credibility for your green marketing claims Green or ethical practices must be supported from the top down to be genuine and become a true part of a company’s culture. It is not just about a few ‘green’ marketing claims. EXERCISE: Answer the following questions on a Scale of 1 - 5 (1 = low + 5 = high). What improvements can you make? Do we have a genuine company-wide green culture? Are our green marketing claims consistent with our corporate actions? Are our brand-related sustainability claims meaningful, specific, com- plete, and without exaggeration? Are we being transparent about the pollution our products represent as well as their environmental benefits? Are we being environmentally efficient with our marketing materials? SCALE 1-5 SUGGESTED IMPROVEMENTS Have we identified where online or digital media could work to reduce our use of paper? Are we using recycled and/or sustainably harvested paper and vegetable-based inks for our marketing communications? Have we tested their believability among customers? Does our CEO openly support sustainability? Do our stakeholders know it? ETHICS
  90. 90. six: CREATING ETHICAL MARKETING PRINCIPLES How to understand the new principles of ethical marketing To adopt a new ethical approach to marketing you will need to challenge some of your existing habits and behaviours (from Ottman’s The New Rules of Green Marketing). EXERCISE: How are you challenging conventional marketing in your business? CONSUMERS PRODUCTS MARKETING + COMMS CORPORATE Consumers with lifestyles Cradle to grave Products Globally sourced One size fits all Product end-benefits Selling One-way communication Paid advertising Secretive Reactive Independent + autonomous Competitive Departmentalised Short term-orientated/ profit-maximising People with lives Cradle to cradle Services Locally sourced Regionally tailored Values Educating + empowering Creating community Word of mouth Transparent Proactive Interdependent/allied with stakeholders Cooperative Holistic Long term-orientated CONVENTIONAL MARKETING GREEN MARKETING YOUR BUSINESS
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