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Keynote at AsianPLoP2020
Ph.D in Media and Governance
Professor at Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University
President...
• introduce several pattern languages for human action
(activity design) in everyday life, work, and education.
• present ...
Evolution of Pattern Language
Evolution of Pattern Language
• Education (Iba, et al., 2011; Iba & Utsunomiya, 2017)
• Learning (Iba, et al., 2009; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014)
• Collaboratio...
Some Examples of Pattern Languages we created
‣Presentation Patterns
‣Collaboration Patterns
‣Learning Patterns
‣Words for...
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Presentation
Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative
Presentations, CreativeShift, 2014...
Creative Presentation Main Message Touching Gift
Image of Success Storytelling Exploration of Words
Visual Power Dramatic ...
Context
Problem
Solution
Consequence
Pattern Name
Introductory Sentense
Pattern Illustration
Forces
Actions
Adventure Playground 670 words
2 photos, 1 sketch
Abstract Factory 2,159 words
2 diagram
83 lines code
182 words
1 illustr...
Presentation Pattern Cards
Dialogue workshop to share experiences of
presentation with using the Presentation Patterns
in a class for high school stu...
experience
as a whole
experience
as a whole
pattern pattern
pattern
pattern
Pattern Language
as Vocabulary for
Communicati...
A workshop for high school teachers
What
Why How
Who
When Where
何を
誰が
なぜ
どこでいつ
どのように
「つくる」ことの
本質的な一部
「つくる」ことの
背景にあたる部分
Who
When Where
誰が
どこでいつ
What
Why How
何を...
Collaborating to improve
their own presentations
with the Presentation Pattern
A workshop for graduate students
Presentation Patterns
in an elementary school
TV Program “SuperPresentation”, NHK, 2012
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Presentation
Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative
Presentations, CreativeShift, 2014...
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Collaboration
Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative
Collaboration, CreativeShift, 201...
Sharing the stories of experience of collaboration
with the Collaboration Patterns
Collaboration Patterns
in a school training for
middle and high school teachers
Using the Collaboration Patterns
In Junior High School, Japan
Reflecting and improving research
project with the Collaboration Patterns
Collaboration Patterns Workshop at a
school, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Collaboration
Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative
Collaboration, CreativeShift, 201...
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Learning Patterns: A
Pattern Language for Creative Learning, CreativeShift, 2014
Learning...
Dialogue Workshop
with the Learning Patterns
1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning
Patt...
Preparation for Dialogue Workshop
Circle all patterns that
you have experienced.
Also, put a start mark on just
5 patterns...
Look for a person who has experienced
the learning patterns you want to gain.
Listen to their experience of the learning.
1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning
Patterns every year, for past 9 years (Keio Unive...
1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning
Patterns every year, for past 9 years (Keio Unive...
Strong agree + Agree
= 95.7%
Survey after the Dialogue Workshop, 2017
(N = 710)
Do you think it was important for you to l...
Strong agree + Agree
= 88.3%
(N = 710)
About the five patters you have chosen; are you
now able to imagine clearly how you...
Strong agree + Agree
= 90.3%
(N = 710)
Did you feel that the Learning Patterns helped you
to tell someone your own stories...
Strong agree + Agree
= 96.5%
(N = 710)
All in all, was it enjoyable for you to read the
Learning Patterns and to have the ...
Takashi Iba, “Pattern Languages as Media for Creative Dialogue: Functional Analysis of Dialogue Workshops,”
in P. Baumgart...
Adventure Playground 670 words
2 photos, 1 sketch
Abstract Factory 2,159 words
2 diagram
83 lines code
182 words
1 illustr...
experience
as a whole
experience
as a whole
pattern pattern
pattern
pattern
Pattern Language
as Vocabulary for
Communicati...
Planning based on the Dialogue Workshop
Ask students to plan their way of learning in the semester
For the five patterns I ...
What
Why How
Who
When Where
何を
誰が
なぜ
どこでいつ
どのように
「つくる」ことの
本質的な一部
「つくる」ことの
背景にあたる部分
Who
When Where
誰が
どこでいつ
What
Why How
何を...
LearningPatterns:APatternLanguageforCreativeLearning(ver.1.00)
A Pattern Language
for Creative Learning
Ver. 1.00
Sep, 201...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
4. Jump In 37. Frontier
Finder
34.
Questioning
Mind
7. Output-Driven
Learning
31. Talking
Thinker
10. Tornado
of Learning
...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
No.1	Opportunity	for	Learning	
No.2	Learning	by	Crea6ng	
No.3	Open	Learning	
No.4	Jump	In	
No.5	Copycat	Learner	
							No...
Pattern App ‘Patterns We Live By’
Yuki Kawabe, Haruka Mori, Aimi Burgoyne, Takashi Iba, “Pattern Experience Chart Generato...
16. Thinking in Action
17. Prototyping
18. Field Diving
19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye
20. Hidden Connections
21. Triangular...
2011	 2012	 2013	 2014	 2015	 2016	
How many participants chose each
pattern for gaining in the near future? 5,353 student...
Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Learning
Patterns: Eine Mustersprache für kreatives
Lernen, translated by Reinhard Bauer,...
Takashi Iba, Makoto Okada, Iba Laboratory,
Dementia Friendly Japan Initiative, Words for
a Journey: The Art of Being with ...
15 Gift of Words12 Live in the
Moment
13 Self-Intro Album 14 Own Way of
Expressing
11 Turning the Tide10 Voice of
Experien...
16 Going Together 17 Team Leader
30 Generational Mix 31 The Amusement
Committee
32 Hint of Feelings28 Casual Counseling 29...
37 Mix-Up Event
33 Job-Specific
Contributions
38 Inventing Jobs
34 On-the-Spot
Helper
39 Delivering
the Voice
35 Encouragi...
Network of Related Patterns
-5
90000
Quality of Life (QOL)
Self-Intro Album
A picture is worth a thousand words.
You recently have many opportunities
to meet new people.
▼ In this c...
Can-Do List
Don’t get too depressed
by the things you can’t do.
You are trying to live positively with
dementia, but there...
at a day care center, Tokyo
Words for a Journey (Pattern Language
for living well with dementia)
in a meeting of those living with dementia
Dementia cafe at Starbucks Coffee, Tokyo
Used in Training courses and workshop for caregivers and
supporters for the elderly, many areas in Japan
Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for
living well with dementia)
in a meeting for supporters in a local community
Action Guidebook for people with dementia,
provided by local government, Kawasaki
Words for a Journey (Pattern Language
for living well with dementia)
in a hospital
Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for
living well with dementia)
in a meeting for supporters in a local community
(ele...
Words for a Journey (Pattern Language
for living well with dementia)
in a nursing education
Online Session with Words for a Journey in Kumamoto (2020)
168 participants, connecting 31 high schools
旅程的關 字
與認知障礙症共存的啟示
三聯書店(香港)
編著:井庭崇、岡田誠
著 :慶應義塾大學井庭研究室、
   認知障礙症 FRIENDLY JAPAN・INITIATIVE
Translated into traditional Chin...
Takashi Iba, Makoto Okada,
Iba Laboratory , Dementia
Friendly Japan Initiative,
Words for a Journey: The
Art of Being with...
Some Examples of Pattern Languages we created
‣Presentation Patterns
‣Collaboration Patterns
‣Learning Patterns
‣Words for...
Very Quick Overview of
Other Pattern Languages we created
‣Project Design Patterns
‣Words for a Dialogue
‣Affective-Scienc...
Takashi Iba, Fumio Kajiwara, Project Design Patterns: 32
Patterns of Practical Knowledge for Producers, Project
Managers, ...
A Pattern Language for Dissolving Problems
Based on the Open Dialogue Approach
Words for a Dialogue
English translation bo...
Affective-Science-based Marketing Patterns
40 patterns (+113 action patterns)
for practicing and mastering
value-creation ...
Active Learning Patterns for Teachers
Takashi Iba & Yoshihiro Utsunomiya, “Active Learning Patterns for Teachers”, in Purs...
Omotenashi (Hospitality) Design Patterns
in collaboration with UDS Ltd.
28 patterns for creative hospitality
Miwane Umewak...
Middle Leader Patterns for Child Care
27 patterns for middle leader
at preschools and kindergarten
in collaboration with T...
A Pattern Language for Creative Reading
Life with Reading
Takashi Iba, Aimi Burgoyne, Ayaka Yoshikawa, Fumie Niwai, Norihi...
in collaboration with
Benesse Corporation
36 patterns for inquiry-based learning
by high school students
Inquiry-based Lea...
Life Transition Patterns
Takashi Iba & Tomoko Kubo, “Life Transition Patterns: A Pattern Language for Shaping Your Future”...
Ways of Everyday World-Making
in collaboration with Kao
Corporation
34 patterns for living well with Working and Parenting...
Cooking Patterns
in collaboration with Cookpad, Inc.
47 patterns for life with Cooking,
improving cooking skills, and
enjo...
Cook-That-Dish Patterns for Tacos
Team Tortilla
トルティーヤ
難易度:★★★
必要なもの
適切人数:6-9
生地をつくる人(2-3)、
伸ばす人(2-3)、焼く人(2-3)
ベーキング
パウダー
...
Survival Language is a pattern language to support survival when
a catastrophic earthquake occurs. The basis of this propo...
In the 21st century, complex social challenges, widespread
inter-connectedness, and changes in economies, environ-
ments, ...
• Education (Iba, et al., 2011; Iba & Utsunomiya, 2017)
• Learning (Iba, et al., 2009; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014)
• Collaboratio...
Pattern Mining
Pattern Symbolizing
Pattern Writing
Pattern Language
Creation
Drawing a Map
Grasping the
Mined Elements Gro...
Evolution of Pattern Language
Pattern Languages empower people to create things they desire
to create, and enables them to participate in creative activ...
If more pattern languages are created in various domains, it will
become much easier for people to try engaging in creativ...
From the creativity viewpoint, it can be said that this ability to
step into various creative activities is a new kind of ...
COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020
COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020
I asked myself what I, as a researcher and educator, could do.
COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020
I asked myself what I, as a researcher and educator, could do.
I realized that the things I have f...
This project began as a serialization on my blog in Japanese
The book will be published in Japanese
at the end of September, 2020
井庭 崇, 『コロナの時代の暮らしのヒント』,
晶文社, 2020年9月出版
Hints for Bett...
The paper will be presented at PLoP2020 conference,
October, 2020
Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation
I have picked a number of patterns out of many pattern languages made
in vario...
Pattern Language Remix
Schuler, D. (2015) "Pattern Languages for Public Problem-Solving: Cultivating New Seeds for Social ...
Pattern Language Remix
Grundschober, I., Ghoneim, A., Baumgartner, P., Gruber-Muecke, T. (2018) "A Pattern Language Remix ...
Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation
I have picked a number of patterns out of many pattern languages made
in vario...
Domain Translation
When doing a remix, the situation that should apply differs from that of
the original domain, so it is ...
The book will be published in Japanese
at the end of September, 2020
The paper will be presented at PLoP2020
conference, O...
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 32
32 Hints for Better Living
in the C...
1. Think of these different from usual days as A NEW JOURNEY
and make them into wonderful and memorable ones.
In this situ...
2. FOCUS AND SIMPLIFY to prevent yourself from building up
stress.
As you continue to work from home or the time your
chil...
2. Through a DAILY USE OF RESERVES, build a pantry with
nothing past the expiration date.
According to the spread of the p...
5. Be the supporting role in your children’s’ education so they can
be an ACTIVE LEARNER.
In this situation, there are mos...
7. Make your own PERSONAL BOOKSHELF at home filled with
everything that excites you.
It may be a little difficult to spend a...
8. When teaching your family something, make them start as a
COPYCAT LEARNER.
You may have to teach your child how to stud...
9. Build an AMUSEMENT COMMITTEE to create and carry out
fun plans!
In the current situation with the pandemic, it is diffic...
線上 火
焚き火Zoom
You will find sharing an image of a bonfire and watching it while talking as if you were camping to
be a unique...
11. Build a FARM AT HOME to have a lifestyle that has a
connection with nature. Whether it is going to the beach, going to...
家庭菜園
Growing vegetables in a garden
or on the porch
16. Rather than focusing on things you cannot do in this situation,
write a CAN-DO LIST and live positively.
Thinking abou...
Sweets
スイーツ
甜點
おつまみSnack Food
下酒菜
17. Realize that you can understand any strange behavior by
looking at their EXPERIENCED WORLD from an INNER
VIEWPOINT. Th...
21. Make sure to TAKE ONE BREATH OUT and give an
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF EFFORTS when any of your family
members make a mistake...
25. Consider if what JOB-SPECIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS you can
do and move to do your PART TO CONTRIBUTE.
In the midst of this gr...
31. Go about POLISHING SENSES at home by discussing what
you feel while looking over pictures and paintings to discover yo...
Search keywords such as ‘beautiful rainbows,’ ‘beautiful dresses,’
‘breath-taking views,’ ‘cute pandas,’ etc., choose pict...
32. Do what you can so that this experience can become
PLEASANT MEMORIES for you and your loved ones and you can
one day r...
Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation
Quality of Life
in the situation with COVID-19
When doing a pattern language r...
Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation
• In this case with the current COVID-19 pandemic, many people are
working and...
The book will be published in Japanese
at the end of September, 2020
The paper will be presented at PLoP2020
conference, O...
Project Members of Iba Lab, Keio University & CreativeShift, Inc.
English Translation
by Aimi Burgoyne
Illustrated by
Kaori Harasawa
2020 Scenes
Evolution of Pattern Language
Further
Evolution of Pattern Language
John Dewey, “Creative democracy: The task before us”, 1939
John Dewey
(1859 – 1952)
In J. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The ...
Keynote at AsianPLoP2020
Ph.D in Media and Governance
Professor at Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University
President...
Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"
Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"
Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"
Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"
Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"
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Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"

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Takashi Iba's Keynote "Support for Living Better Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages: An Attempt at Pattern Translation to Another Domain and Pattern Language Remix" at AsianPLoP 2020: 9th Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs, Sep 4th, 2020.

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Takashi Iba's Keynote at AsianPLoP2020: "Support for Living Better 
Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages"

  1. 1. Keynote at AsianPLoP2020 Ph.D in Media and Governance Professor at Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University President of CreativeShift, Inc. Support for Living Better 
 Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages Takashi Iba An Attempt at Pattern Translation to Another Domain and Pattern Language Remix
  2. 2. • introduce several pattern languages for human action (activity design) in everyday life, work, and education. • present my recent project utilizing our pattern languages to support for living through the current COVID-19 situation. In this keynote, I will …
  3. 3. Evolution of Pattern Language
  4. 4. Evolution of Pattern Language
  5. 5. • Education (Iba, et al., 2011; Iba & Utsunomiya, 2017) • Learning (Iba, et al., 2009; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Collaboration (Iba, et al., 2013; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Presentation (Iba, et al., 2012; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Reading (Iba, et al., 2018) • Open Dialogue (Iba et al., 2017; Iba & Nagai, 2018) • Motivating Self-Improvement (Burgoyne &Iba, 2017) • Life Transition (Iba & Kubo, 2017) • Project Design (Kubota et al., 2016; Iba et al., 2017) • School Design (Iba et al., 2015) • Workshop Design (Iba, 2012; Akado et al., 2015) • Middle Leader for Child Care (Nozawa, et al., 2018) • Omotenashi (Hospitality) (Iba & Nakagawa, 2019) • Cooking (Akado et al., 2016; Yoshikawa et al., 2018; Isaku & Iba, 2016) • Managing Everyday Life with Working and Parenting (Ogo et al., 2017) • Living Lively and Beautiful (Arao et al., 2012) • Natural Living - Ethical Lifestyle (Kamada et al., 2016) • Living well with Dementia (Iba & Okada, 2015; Iba, et al., 2016) • Social Entrepreneurship (Shimomukai, et al., 2012; Shimomukai, et al., 2015) • Cross-Border Leadership (Miura, et al., 2016) • Public Policy Design (Iba & Takenaka, 2017) • Surviving Earthquakes (Furukawazono et al., 2013; Furukawazono & Iba, 2015) • Conservation of Ecosystem (Kamada et al., 2018) + about 400 meta-patterns We have created 60 pattern languages in various domain including 1,600 patterns for past 10 years.
  6. 6. Some Examples of Pattern Languages we created ‣Presentation Patterns ‣Collaboration Patterns ‣Learning Patterns ‣Words for a Journey 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000
  7. 7. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations, CreativeShift, 2014 Presentation Patterns Mary Lynn Manns, Linda R 善出版, 2014 組織変革の秘訣をまとめたパ ランゲージ3.0の先駆的な書 『Fearless Change ― ア に効くアイデアを組織に めの48のパターン』井庭崇+井庭研究室, 慶應義塾大学 出版会, 2013 プレゼンテーション・パターンを例を 交えてわかりやすく紹介している書籍 『プレゼンテーション・パターン ― 創造を誘発する表現のヒント』 Takashi Iba, Aya Matsumoto, and Kaori Harasawa, “Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations,” Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2012), 2012 Takashi Iba and Taichi Isaku, “Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations, Part I,” 10th Latin American Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (SugerLoafPLoP2014), 2014
  8. 8. Creative Presentation Main Message Touching Gift Image of Success Storytelling Exploration of Words Visual Power Dramatic Modulation Unexpected Evolution Doors of Mystery Beautiful Clarity Perfect Portion Cherry on Top Mind Bridge Reality Sharing Participation Driver Quality in Details Expression Coordinator DINOSAUR Discomfort Removing Significant Void Activation Switch Take-Home Gift Stage Building Reminders of Success Presentership Best Effort Construction of Confidence Invitation to the World Improvised Presentation Personally for You Unique Presenter Aesthetics of Presenting Reflecting Forwards Be Authentic! A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations, CreativeShift, 2014 34 patterns for designing creative presentations
  9. 9. Context Problem Solution Consequence Pattern Name Introductory Sentense Pattern Illustration Forces Actions
  10. 10. Adventure Playground 670 words 2 photos, 1 sketch Abstract Factory 2,159 words 2 diagram 83 lines code 182 words 1 illustration Jump In (C. Alexander) (GoF’s Design Patterns) (Learning Patterns) PL for architecture Intentionally simple because of using pattern languages as media for narrative & dialogues PL for software PL for human action
  11. 11. Presentation Pattern Cards
  12. 12. Dialogue workshop to share experiences of presentation with using the Presentation Patterns in a class for high school students
  13. 13. experience as a whole experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Vocabulary for Communication pattern Peer Learning with Pattern Languages Using patterns for learning from others, not only from the patterns themselves You can learn a lot from your peers
 with using a Pattern Language
  14. 14. A workshop for high school teachers
  15. 15. What Why How Who When Where 何を 誰が なぜ どこでいつ どのように 「つくる」ことの 本質的な一部 「つくる」ことの 背景にあたる部分 Who When Where 誰が どこでいつ What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Glasses of Recognition experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pa Pattern Language as Glasses of Recognition experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Glasses of RecognitionA Pattern Languages supports design & improvement
  16. 16. Collaborating to improve their own presentations with the Presentation Pattern A workshop for graduate students
  17. 17. Presentation Patterns in an elementary school
  18. 18. TV Program “SuperPresentation”, NHK, 2012
  19. 19. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations, CreativeShift, 2014 Presentation Patterns Mary Lynn Manns, Linda R 善出版, 2014 組織変革の秘訣をまとめたパ ランゲージ3.0の先駆的な書 『Fearless Change ― ア に効くアイデアを組織に めの48のパターン』井庭崇+井庭研究室, 慶應義塾大学 出版会, 2013 プレゼンテーション・パターンを例を 交えてわかりやすく紹介している書籍 『プレゼンテーション・パターン ― 創造を誘発する表現のヒント』 Takashi Iba, Aya Matsumoto, and Kaori Harasawa, “Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations,” Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2012), 2012 Takashi Iba and Taichi Isaku, “Presentation Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Presentations, Part I,” 10th Latin American Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (SugerLoafPLoP2014), 2014
  20. 20. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Collaboration Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Collaboration, CreativeShift, 2014 Collaboration Patterns Takashi Iba and Taichi Isaku, "Collaboration Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Collaborations," Proceedings of the 18th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2013), 2013 Creative Collaboration Create a Legend Response Rally Return of Growth Mission for the Future Growth Spiral Feeling of Togetherness Spontaneous Commitments Innovative Ways Sympathetic Union Part to Contribute Loose Connections Vulnerability Disclosure Loaf of Time Chaotic Path to Breakthrough Roadmap to the Goal Words of Thanks Collaborative Field Ideas Taking Shape Improvised Roles Emergence Vigor Activity Footprints Inside Innovator Spadework for Creativity Quality Line Beyond Expectations Context of the World Creative Clashes Project Followers Endurance to Continue Creating Power to Change the World Generative Destruction Strategic Developments Polishing Senses Vulnerability Disclosure Loaf of Time Chaotic Path to Breakthrough Roadmap to the Goal Words of Thanks Collaborative Field Ideas Taking Shape Improvised Roles Emergence Vigor Activity Footprints Inside Innovator Spadework for Creativity 34 patterns for conducting creative collaborations How to create something great together with others as a team
  21. 21. Sharing the stories of experience of collaboration with the Collaboration Patterns
  22. 22. Collaboration Patterns in a school training for middle and high school teachers
  23. 23. Using the Collaboration Patterns In Junior High School, Japan
  24. 24. Reflecting and improving research project with the Collaboration Patterns
  25. 25. Collaboration Patterns Workshop at a school, Democratic Republic of the Congo
  26. 26. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Collaboration Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Collaboration, CreativeShift, 2014 Collaboration Patterns Takashi Iba and Taichi Isaku, "Collaboration Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Collaborations," Proceedings of the 18th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2013), 2013 Creative Collaboration Create a Legend Response Rally Return of Growth Mission for the Future Growth Spiral Feeling of Togetherness Spontaneous Commitments Innovative Ways Sympathetic Union Part to Contribute Loose Connections Vulnerability Disclosure Loaf of Time Chaotic Path to Breakthrough Roadmap to the Goal Words of Thanks Collaborative Field Ideas Taking Shape Improvised Roles Emergence Vigor Activity Footprints Inside Innovator Spadework for Creativity Quality Line Beyond Expectations Context of the World Creative Clashes Project Followers Endurance to Continue Creating Power to Change the World Generative Destruction Strategic Developments Polishing Senses Vulnerability Disclosure Loaf of Time Chaotic Path to Breakthrough Roadmap to the Goal Words of Thanks Collaborative Field Ideas Taking Shape Improvised Roles Emergence Vigor Activity Footprints Inside Innovator Spadework for Creativity 34 patterns for conducting creative collaborations How to create something great together with others as a team
  27. 27. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Learning Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Learning, CreativeShift, 2014 Learning Patterns T. Iba, T. Miyake, M. Naruse, N. Yotsumoto, “Learning Patterns: A Pattern Language for Active Learners”, 16th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2009), 2009 Takashi Iba and Toko Miyake, “Learning Patterns: A Pattern Language for Creative Learning II,” Proceedings of the 1st Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (AsianPLoP2010), 2010 Takashi Iba and Mami Sakamoto, “Learning Patterns III: A Pattern Language for Creative Learning,” Proceedings of the 18th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2011), 2011 40 patterns for designing creative learning
  28. 28. Dialogue Workshop with the Learning Patterns 1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning Patterns every year, for past 9 years (Keio University)
  29. 29. Preparation for Dialogue Workshop Circle all patterns that you have experienced. Also, put a start mark on just 5 patterns that you want to gain in the near future. * Consider “learning” in a broad sense, including skill development of music, sports, hobby, social activities, and so on. 19 A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 20 Hidden Connections 21 Triangular Dig 22 Passion for Exploration 23 Brain Switch 24 Fruit Farming 25 Attractive Expressions 26 The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27 Acceleration to the Next 28 Community of Learning 29 Serendipitous Encounters 30 Good Rivals 31 Talking Thinker 32 Leaning by Teaching 33 Firm Determinations 34 Questioning Mind 35 The Right Way 36 Brave Changes 37 Frontier Finder 38 Self-Producer 39 Be Extreme! 0 Creative Learning 1 Opportunity for Learning 2 Learning by Creating 3 Open Learning 4 Jump In 5 Copycat Learner 6 Effective Asking 7 Output-Driven Learning 8 Daily Use of Foreign Language 9 Playful Learning 10 Tornado of Learning 11 Chain of Excitement 12 Quantity brings Quality 13 Skill Embodiment 14 Language Shower 15 Tangible Growth 16 Thinking in Action 17 Prototyping 18 Field Diving Name Circle all patterns that you have experienced. Also, put a star mark on just 5 patterns that you want to gain in the near future. * Consider “learning” in a broad sense, including skill development of music, sports, hobby, social activities, and so on. For Workshop Yukichi Fukuzawa
  30. 30. Look for a person who has experienced the learning patterns you want to gain. Listen to their experience of the learning.
  31. 31. 1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning Patterns every year, for past 9 years (Keio University)
  32. 32. 1,000 freshmen participate in dialogue workshops with using the Learning Patterns every year, for past 9 years (Keio University) Thanks to Keiji Takeda Lab for recording this video with drone
  33. 33. Strong agree + Agree = 95.7% Survey after the Dialogue Workshop, 2017 (N = 710) Do you think it was important for you to listen to the learning experiences of others, in order to help you think about your own way of learning? Takashi Iba, “Peer Learning via Dialogue with a Pattern Language”, in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.197-209 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-74295-3_16
  34. 34. Strong agree + Agree = 88.3% (N = 710) About the five patters you have chosen; are you now able to imagine clearly how you can actually take action? Takashi Iba, “Peer Learning via Dialogue with a Pattern Language”, in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.197-209 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-74295-3_16 Survey after the Dialogue Workshop, 2017
  35. 35. Strong agree + Agree = 90.3% (N = 710) Did you feel that the Learning Patterns helped you to tell someone your own stories of learning in the dialogue? Survey after the Dialogue Workshop, 2017 Takashi Iba, “Peer Learning via Dialogue with a Pattern Language”, in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.197-209 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-74295-3_16
  36. 36. Strong agree + Agree = 96.5% (N = 710) All in all, was it enjoyable for you to read the Learning Patterns and to have the dialogue with others? Survey after the Dialogue Workshop, 2017 Takashi Iba, “Peer Learning via Dialogue with a Pattern Language”, in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.197-209 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-74295-3_16
  37. 37. Takashi Iba, “Pattern Languages as Media for Creative Dialogue: Functional Analysis of Dialogue Workshops,” in P. Baumgartner, R. Sickinger (eds), PURPLSOC: The Workshop 2014, 2015. pp.236-255 https://www.purplsoc.org/the-books/ • It was a surprise to find out so many people around me had ideas that I never thought of before. Talking to people who would listen closely to my stories and answer my questions generously made the workshop very inspiring. • By having other people explain with their stories the patterns that I want to adopt, the rather abstract image of the patterns became more concrete and started to seem feasible. • I found out through the workshop that people could have different types of stories even though they are based on the same pattern. • I was thinking about the amount of experience everyone has. The stories from my peers made me realize how much more there still is for me to experience and learn. • This workshop was a good opportunity for me to organize the experiences I have had up until now. I was able to figure out things that I still need to work on and things that I want to start working on. • This made me realize how each one of us is full of unique experiences. This also made me realize how valuable my past actions are, and it helped them become a source of confidence for me. • Through the workshop, I was able to find a solution to a problem I had been worrying about since I started college. • Speaking to someone new about a story of my experience was something I have never done before and was fun. • I actually made several new friends.
  38. 38. Adventure Playground 670 words 2 photos, 1 sketch Abstract Factory 2,159 words 2 diagram 83 lines code 182 words 1 illustration Jump In (C. Alexander) (GoF’s Design Patterns) (Learning Patterns) PL for architecture Intentionally simple because of using pattern languages as media for narrative & dialogues PL for software PL for human action
  39. 39. experience as a whole experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Vocabulary for Communication pattern Peer Learning with Pattern Languages Using patterns for learning from others, not only from the patterns themselves You can learn a lot from your peers
 with using a Pattern Language
  40. 40. Planning based on the Dialogue Workshop Ask students to plan their way of learning in the semester For the five patterns I want to gain this semester, I chose Field Diving, Daily Use of Foreign Language, Hidden Connections, Open Learning, and Questioning Mind. I chose these patterns because these patterns are experiences that are very appealing to me, and ones in which I’ve never gotten to experience before. During the workshop, I met and talked with several classmates for the same time. Through hearing their experiences, I was able to get an insight into each of their lives, as well as how I can strive to explore their learning patterns in the future. For the Field Diving pattern, I talked to someone from the United States who was very interested in learning Japanese, and had been studying Japanese from textbooks on her own. She said that before coming to Keio, she took a scholarship trip to Japan to learn outside the textbook, in a real setting. Her trip to Japan was an opportunity for her to take her interest and “dive My plan to gain the five patterns I have chosen Daily Use of Foreign Language: I want to join some circles as soon as possible, so that I have more opportunities to converse with Japanese students. Also, when I go to eat at restaurants, I should practice ordering in Japanese and improve my speech. Hidden Connections: Since there are many new things that I will learn in all my university courses, I should try my best to recall most of the information I obtained from high school, so that I can relate my past knowledge with these new materials and understand
  41. 41. What Why How Who When Where 何を 誰が なぜ どこでいつ どのように 「つくる」ことの 本質的な一部 「つくる」ことの 背景にあたる部分 Who When Where 誰が どこでいつ What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように What Why How 何を なぜ どのように experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Glasses of Recognition experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pa Pattern Language as Glasses of Recognition experience as a whole pattern pattern pattern pattern Pattern Language as Glasses of RecognitionA Pattern Languages supports design & improvement
  42. 42. LearningPatterns:APatternLanguageforCreativeLearning(ver.1.00) A Pattern Language for Creative Learning Ver. 1.00 Sep, 2014 learningpatterns@sfc.keio.ac.jp patterns Creative Learning Opportunity for Learning Learning by Creating Open Learning Jump In Copycat Learner Effective Asking Output-Driven Learning Daily Use of Foreign Language Playful Learning Tornado of Learning Chain of Excitement Quantity brings Quality Skill Embodiment Language Shower Tangible Growth Thinking in Action Prototyping Field Diving Hidden Connections Triangular Dig Passion for Exploration Brain Switch Fruit Farming Attractive Expressions The First-Draft-Halfway-Point Acceleration to the Next Community of Learning Serendipitous Encounters Good Rivals Talking Thinker Leaning by Teaching Firm Determinations Questioning Mind The Right Way Brave Changes Frontier Finder Self-Producer Be Extreme! 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 ver. 1.00 A Pattern Language for Creative Learning patterns 4. Jump In 22. Passion for Exploration 35. The Right Way 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 14. Language Shower 21. Triangular Dig 17. Prototyping 12. Quantity brings Quality 24. Fruit Farming 27. Acceleration to the Next 30. Good Rivals 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self-Producer 34. Questioning Mind 36. Brave Changes 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 33. Firm Determinations 32. Learning by Teaching 13. Skill Embodiment 15. Tangible Growth 11. Chain of Excitement 10. Tornade of Learning 16. Thinking in Action 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 37. Frontier Finder 23. Brain Switch 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity for Learning Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique 3 patterns in each group
  43. 43. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  44. 44. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  45. 45. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  46. 46. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  47. 47. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  48. 48. 4. Jump In 37. Frontier Finder 34. Questioning Mind 7. Output-Driven Learning 31. Talking Thinker 10. Tornado of Learning 13. Skill Embodiment 16. Thinking in Action 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye View 22. Passion for Exploration 25. Attractive Expressions 28. Community of Learning 6. Effective Asking 5. Copycat Learner 39. Be Extreme! 38. Self- Producer 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 9. Playful Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 32. Leaning by Teaching 33. Firm Determinations 12. Quantity brings Quality 11. Chain of Excitement 15. Tangible Growth 14. Language Shower 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 21. Triangular Dig20. Hidden Connections 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 26. The First-Draft- Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 3. Open Learning 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity for Learning 2. Learning by Creating 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! Core Start to Learn Learning in Practice Chain of Learning Skill Development Action Learning Abductive Thinking Creative Process Power to Complete Peers for Learning Interpersonal Learning Reflective Thinking Grow to be Unique Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 patterns in each group 0 2 3 1
  49. 49. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Takashi Iba & Ayaka Yoshikawa, “Understanding the Functions of Pattern Language with Vygotsky’s Psychology: Signs, The Zone of Proximal Development, and Predicate in Inner Speech,” 23rd Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2016), 2016 https://www.hillside.net/plop/2016/papers/proceedings/ Have Experienced Want to Gain Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns Real example of a freshman
  50. 50. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Have Experienced Want to Gain Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns
  51. 51. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Have Experienced Want to Gain Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns Real example of a freshman
  52. 52. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Self-Scaffolding to the Zone of Proximal Development with a Pattern Language Zone of Proximal Development What learners can do with guidance or with help Present Level of Development Feel the strong emotion of accom- plishment, which will motivate your learning. Excitement comes to people who crave for it. Chain of Excitement Takashi Iba & Ayaka Yoshikawa, “Understanding the Functions of Pattern Language with Vygotsky’s Psychology: Signs, The Zone of Proximal Development, and Predicate in Inner Speech,” 23rd Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2016), 2016 https://www.hillside.net/plop/2016/papers/proceedings/ Have Experienced Want to Gain
  53. 53. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Have Experienced Want to Gain Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns Real example of a freshman
  54. 54. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! Expansion of Experience (1.5 years later) (When entering the college) Have Experienced Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns Real example of a freshman
  55. 55. No.1 Opportunity for Learning No.2 Learning by Crea6ng No.3 Open Learning No.4 Jump In No.5 Copycat Learner No.6 Effec6ve Learning No.7 Output-Driven Learning No.8 Daily Use of Foreign Language No.9 Playful Learning No.10 Tornado of Learning No.11 Chain of Excitement No.12 Quan6ty brings Quality No.13 Skill Embodiment No.14 Language Shower No.15 Tangible Growth No.16 Thinking in Ac6on No.17 Prototyping No.18 Field Diving No.19 A Bug's-Eye & Bird's-Eye View No.20 Hidden Connec6ons No.21 Triangular Dig No.22 Passion for Explora6on . No.23 Brain Switch No.24 Fruit Farming No.25 Arac6ve Expressions No.26 The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point No.27 Accelera6on to the Next No.28 Community of Learning No.29 Serendipitous Encounters No.30 Good Rivals No.31 Talking Thinker No.32 Learning by Teaching No.33 Firm Determina6ons No.34 Learning by Teaching No.35 Firm Determina6ons No.36 Ques6oning Mind No.37 Fron6er Finder No.38 Self-Producer No.39 Be Extreme! 1 year in College Students after 1.5 years in College Students after 2 years in College Experience Chart of the Learning Patterns 3 years in College Students after 4 years in College Students after 5 years in College
  56. 56. Pattern App ‘Patterns We Live By’ Yuki Kawabe, Haruka Mori, Aimi Burgoyne, Takashi Iba, “Pattern Experience Chart Generator function on a pattern language platform Patterns We Live By”, Proceedings of the 23rd European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP18), 2018 Yuki Kawabe, Takashi Iba, “An Ecosystem for Collaborative Pattern Language Acquisition”, Collaborative Innovation Networks Conference 2019 (COINs), 2019 https://patternapp.net Developed by Yuki Kawabe
  57. 57. 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Attractive Expressions 26. The First-Draft-Halfway-Point 27. Acceleration to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determination 34. Questioning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Frontier Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0. Creative Learning 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Creating 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effective Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quantity brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Action 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connections 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Exploration 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 How many students have experience of each pattern? 5,353 students ( 821 678 871 912 1040 1031 ) Takashi Iba, “Using Pattern Languages as Media for Mining, Analysing, and Visualising Experiences,” International Journal of Organisational Design and Engineering, Vol. 3, No.3/4, pp.278-301, 2014
  58. 58. 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 How many participants chose each pattern for gaining in the near future? 5,353 students ( 821 678 871 912 1040 1031 ) 0 10 20 30 40 50 0. Crea-ve Learning 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Crea-ng 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effec-ve Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quan-ty brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Ac-on 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connec-ons 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Explora-on 16. Thinking in Ac-on 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connec-ons 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Explora-on 23. Brain Switch 24. Fruit Farming 25. Arac-ve Expressions 26. The First-Dra]-Halfway-Point 27. Accelera-on to the Next 28. Community of Learning 29. Serendipitous Encounters 30. Good Rivals 31. Talking Thinker 32. Learning by Teaching 33. Firm Determina-on 34. Ques-oning Mind 35. The Right Way 36. Brave Changes 37. Fron-er Finder 38. Self-Producer 39. Be Extreme! 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 0 10 20 30 40 50 0. Crea-ve Learning 1. Opportunity of Learning 2. Learning by Crea-ng 3. Open Your Learning 4. Jump In 5. Copycat Learner 6. Effec-ve Asking 7. Output-Driven Learning 8. Daily Use of Foreign Language 9. Playful Learning 10. Tornado of Learning 11. Chain of Excitement! 12. Quan-ty brings Quality 13. Skill Embodiment 14. Language Shower 15. Tangible Growth 16. Thinking in Ac-on 17. Prototyping 18. Field Diving 19. A Bug’s-Eye & Bird’s-Eye 20. Hidden Connec-ons 21. Triangular Dig 22. Passion for Explora-on Takashi Iba, “Using Pattern Languages as Media for Mining, Analysing, and Visualising Experiences,” International Journal of Organisational Design and Engineering, Vol. 3, No.3/4, pp.278-301, 2014
  59. 59. Takashi Iba with Iba Laboratory, Learning Patterns: Eine Mustersprache für kreatives Lernen, translated by Reinhard Bauer, Petra Szucsich & Martin Sankofi, CreativeShift, 2018 Learning Patterns: Eine Mustersprache für kreatives Lernen Learning Patterns in German! Pädagogische Hochschule Wien
  60. 60. Takashi Iba, Makoto Okada, Iba Laboratory, Dementia Friendly Japan Initiative, Words for a Journey: The Art of Being with Dementia, CreativeShift, 2015 Words for a Journey 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000 36 patterns for living well with dementia WORDS FOR CARING FAMILIES WORDS FOR EVERYONE WORDS FOR THOSE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA Takashi Iba, Tomoki Kaneko, Arisa Kamada, Nao Tamaki, Makoto Okada, “Words for a Journey: A Pattern Language for Living Well with Dementia,” Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change. Designing Lively Scenarios in Various Fields, Peter Baumgartner, Tina Gruber-Muecke, Richard Sickinger (Eds.), PURPLSOC, 2016, pp.152-176 Takashi Iba, Aya Matsumoto, Arisa Kamada, Nao Tamaki, Tasuku Matsumura, Tomoki Kaneko, and Makoto Okada, “A Pattern Language for Living Well with Dementia: Words for a Journey,” 5th International Conference on Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs), 2015 Takashi Iba, Aya Matsumoto, Arisa Kamada, Nao Tamaki, and Tomoki Kaneko, "A Pattern Language for Living Well with Dementia: Words for a Journey," International Journal of Organisational Design and Engineering, Volume 4, No. 1/2, 2016, pp.85-112
  61. 61. 15 Gift of Words12 Live in the Moment 13 Self-Intro Album 14 Own Way of Expressing 11 Turning the Tide10 Voice of Experience 7 Daily Chore 8 Self-Reflecting Room 9 Favorite Place 6 Can-Do List5 Fellow Travelers2 The First Step 3 Departure Announcement 4 Travel Plan WORDS FOR THOSE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA
  62. 62. 16 Going Together 17 Team Leader 30 Generational Mix 31 The Amusement Committee 32 Hint of Feelings28 Casual Counseling 29 Special Day 25 The Seen World 26 Personal Time 27 Emotion Switch23 Make it Funny 24 Usual Talk 20 Disclosing Chat 21 Chance to Shine 22 Preparation for the Dream 18 Family Expert 19 The Three Consultants WORDS FOR CARING FAMILIES
  63. 63. 37 Mix-Up Event 33 Job-Specific Contributions 38 Inventing Jobs 34 On-the-Spot Helper 39 Delivering the Voice 35 Encouraging Supporter 40 Warm Design 36 Personal Connections WORDS FOR EVERYONE
  64. 64. Network of Related Patterns -5 90000 Quality of Life (QOL)
  65. 65. Self-Intro Album A picture is worth a thousand words. You recently have many opportunities to meet new people. ▼ In this context You sometimes have trouble introducing yourself with words. ▼ Therefore Keep a small item with you, such as an album, which you can use to show who you are. ▼ Consequently You can stay calm and easily introduce yourself to others. WORDS FOR THOSE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA
  66. 66. Can-Do List Don’t get too depressed by the things you can’t do. You are trying to live positively with dementia, but there will still be times when you feel down. ▼ In this context You may feel trapped by sad feelings caused by fright and worries about your future. ▼ Therefore Make a list of the things that you can still do now. ▼ Consequently You should notice that there is still a lot that you can do. WORDS FOR THOSE LIVING WITH DEMENTIA
  67. 67. at a day care center, Tokyo
  68. 68. Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for living well with dementia) in a meeting of those living with dementia
  69. 69. Dementia cafe at Starbucks Coffee, Tokyo
  70. 70. Used in Training courses and workshop for caregivers and supporters for the elderly, many areas in Japan
  71. 71. Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for living well with dementia) in a meeting for supporters in a local community
  72. 72. Action Guidebook for people with dementia, provided by local government, Kawasaki
  73. 73. Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for living well with dementia) in a hospital
  74. 74. Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for living well with dementia) in a meeting for supporters in a local community (elementary school students)
  75. 75. Words for a Journey (Pattern Language for living well with dementia) in a nursing education
  76. 76. Online Session with Words for a Journey in Kumamoto (2020) 168 participants, connecting 31 high schools
  77. 77. 旅程的關 字 與認知障礙症共存的啟示 三聯書店(香港) 編著:井庭崇、岡田誠 著 :慶應義塾大學井庭研究室、    認知障礙症 FRIENDLY JAPAN・INITIATIVE Translated into traditional Chinese and published in Hong Kong and Taiwan
  78. 78. Takashi Iba, Makoto Okada, Iba Laboratory , Dementia Friendly Japan Initiative, Words for a Journey: The Art of Being with Dementia, CreativeShift, 2015 90000 Newspaper in UK
  79. 79. Some Examples of Pattern Languages we created ‣Presentation Patterns ‣Collaboration Patterns ‣Learning Patterns ‣Words for a Journey 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000
  80. 80. Very Quick Overview of Other Pattern Languages we created ‣Project Design Patterns ‣Words for a Dialogue ‣Affective-Science-based Marketing Patterns ‣Active Learning Patterns for Teachers ‣Omotenashi Design Patterns ‣Middle Leader Patterns for Child Care ‣Life with Reading ‣Inquiry-based Learning Patterns ‣Life Transition Patterns ‣Ways of Everyday World-Making ‣Cooking Patterns ‣Cook-That-Dish Patterns for Tacos ‣Survival Language ‣Change Making Patterns
  81. 81. Takashi Iba, Fumio Kajiwara, Project Design Patterns: 32 Patterns of Practical Knowledge for Producers, Project Managers, and Those Involved in Launching New Businesses, translated by Ayaka Yoshikawa, CreativeShift, 2019 Project Design Patterns in collaboration with UDS Ltd. 32 patterns for generating ideas and cultivating them Korean translation was published in 2018Tetsuro Kubota, Yuji Harashima, Haruka Mori, Toru Ishida, Kaori Harasawa, and Takashi Iba, “Project Design Patterns: Patterns for Designing Architectural Projects,” 5th Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (AsianPLoP2016), 2016 Takashi Iba, Haruka Mori, and Ayaka Yoshikawa, “A Pattern Language for Designing Innovative Projects: Project Design Patterns,” International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 36, 2019, pp.491-518 이바 다카시, 가지와라 후미오, 역자 김영주, 모모세 히로유키, 기획은 패턴이다, 북스톤, 2018
  82. 82. A Pattern Language for Dissolving Problems Based on the Open Dialogue Approach Words for a Dialogue English translation book will be published in 2020 • Takashi Iba, Masafumi Nagai, Reiko Asano, Tsuyoshi Ishida, Misa Eguchi, Airi Matsumiya, “Open dialogue patterns: a pattern language for collaborative problem dissolving”, Proceedings of the VikingPLoP 2017 Conference on Pattern Languages of Program, 2017 • Takashi Iba, Masafumi Nagai, Tsuyoshi Ishida, "Open Dialogue as Coupling of Psychic, Social and Creative Systems", in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.223-235 • Masafumi Nagai, Takashi Iba, "Using Open Dialogue Patterns to Improve Conversation in Daily Life”, in F. Grippa, et al. (eds), Collaborative Innovation Networks: Building Adaptive and Resilient Organizations, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2018, pp.211-222 30 patterns
  83. 83. Affective-Science-based Marketing Patterns 40 patterns (+113 action patterns) for practicing and mastering value-creation marketing Dr. Yuji Kosaka Consignment of creation by Oraculum Co.,Ltd. under the support of the grant by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan. 感性科学マーケティング・パターン 実践・習得のコツのことば オラクルひと・しくみ研究所 カード Iba, T., Masai, M., Abe, Y., and Kosaka, Y., "Patterns for Motivating Customers in a Pattern Language for Affective- Science-based Marketing”, 9th Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (AsianPLoP2020), 2020 Iba, T., Masai, M., Abe, Y., and Kosaka, Y., “Patterns for Building Customer Relationships in a Pattern Language for Affective-Science-based Marketing”, European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2020), 2020 Iba, T., Masai, M., Abe, Y., and Kosaka, Y., “Patterns for Learning Through Practice in a Pattern Language for Affective- Science-based Marketing”, 27th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2020), 2020
  84. 84. Active Learning Patterns for Teachers Takashi Iba & Yoshihiro Utsunomiya, “Active Learning Patterns for Teachers”, in Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change. A comprehensive perspective of current pattern research and practice, R. Sickinger, P. Baumgartner, T. Gruber-Muecke (Eds.), PURPLSOC, 2018. https://www.purplsoc.org/the-books/ in collaboration with Benesse Corporation 45 patterns for teachers to support their students to be a active learners Used in more than 400 schools
  85. 85. Omotenashi (Hospitality) Design Patterns in collaboration with UDS Ltd. 28 patterns for creative hospitality Miwane Umewaka, Ryohei Suzuki, Takashi Iba, "Omotenashi Design Patterns", 9th Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (AsianPLoP2020), 2020
  86. 86. Middle Leader Patterns for Child Care 27 patterns for middle leader at preschools and kindergarten in collaboration with The Center for Early Childhood Development, Education, and Policy Research (cedep) at Graduate School of Education at The University of Tokyo. English translation book will be published Dr. Kiyomi Akita
  87. 87. A Pattern Language for Creative Reading Life with Reading Takashi Iba, Aimi Burgoyne, Ayaka Yoshikawa, Fumie Niwai, Norihiko Kimura, Yasushi Watanabe, “Life with Reading: A Pattern Language for Creative Reading”, Proceedings of Conference on Pattern Language of Programs 25 (PLoP2018), 2018 27 patterns in collaboration with Yurindo
  88. 88. in collaboration with Benesse Corporation 36 patterns for inquiry-based learning by high school students Inquiry-based Learning Patterns Used in about more than 190 high schools (more than 36,000 students) A Pattern Language for Creative Inquiry
  89. 89. Life Transition Patterns Takashi Iba & Tomoko Kubo, “Life Transition Patterns: A Pattern Language for Shaping Your Future”, in Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change. A comprehensive perspective of current pattern research and practice, R. Sickinger, P. Baumgartner, T. Gruber-Muecke (Eds.), PURPLSOC, 2018. https://www.purplsoc.org/the-books/ 27 patterns for life transition in collaboration with Kawaijuku Educational Institution A Pattern Language for Shaping Your Future
  90. 90. Ways of Everyday World-Making in collaboration with Kao Corporation 34 patterns for living well with Working and Parenting Iroha Ogo, Takashi Iba, Kimie Ito, Seiko Miyakawa, “Ways of Everyday World-Making: Living well with Working and Parenting”, in Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change. A comprehensive perspective of current pattern research and practice, R. Sickinger, P. Baumgartner, T. Gruber-Muecke (Eds.), PURPLSOC, 2018. https://www.purplsoc.org/the-books/
  91. 91. Cooking Patterns in collaboration with Cookpad, Inc. 47 patterns for life with Cooking, improving cooking skills, and enjoying cooking Yuma Akado, Shiori Shibata, Ayaka Yoshikawa, Aki Sano, and Takashi Iba “Cooking Patterns: A Pattern Language for Everyday Cooking,” 5th Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (AsianPLoP 2016), 2016 English edition book will be published in 2020 A Pattern Language for Cooking in Everyday Life Takashi Iba, Ayaka Yoshikawa, Tomoki Kaneko, Norihiko Kimura, Tetsuro Kubota, “Pattern Objects: Making Patterns Visible in Daily Life” in Matthaus P. Zylka, Hauke Fuehres, Andrea Fronzetti Colladon, Peter A. Gloor (eds.), Designing Networks for Innovation and Improvisation, Springer International Publishing, COINs, 2016, pp.105-112
 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-42697-6_11 Shiori Shibata Takashi Iba Yuma AkadoAyaka Yoshikawa Cooking Patterns A Pattern Language for Cooking in Everyday Life
  92. 92. Cook-That-Dish Patterns for Tacos Team Tortilla トルティーヤ 難易度:★★★ 必要なもの 適切人数:6-9 生地をつくる人(2-3)、 伸ばす人(2-3)、焼く人(2-3) ベーキング パウダー サランラップ お湯 27 patterns divided into 5 categories Ayaka Yoshikawa, Hitomi Shimizu & Takashi Iba, “Cook-That-Dish Patterns for Tacos: A Tool for Collaborative Cooking”, in Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change. A comprehensive perspective of current pattern research and practice, R. Sickinger, P. Baumgartner, T. Gruber-Muecke (Eds.), PURPLSOC, 2018. https://www.purplsoc.org/the-books/
  93. 93. Survival Language is a pattern language to support survival when a catastrophic earthquake occurs. The basis of this proposal comes from the problem that although countries like Japan have experienced numerous catastrophic earthquakes, avoidable tragedies continue to be repeated because knowledge about disaster risk reduction has not been disseminated effectively. Survival Language is focused specifically at the individual level. It is true that there are many levels of community and governmental support when a catastrophic earthquake occurs. However, such supports are useless if individuals do not survive. It is critical to individual survival to provide techniques for immediate personal implementation when an earthquake occurs. Survival Language seeks to support immediate decisions before, during, and after an earthquake strikes, and to recall earthquake safety measures even in ordinary moments of daily life. Tomoki Furukawazono is a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Media and Governance at Keio University. He is a senior visiting researcher of Keio Research Institute of SFC. He earned a Master of Media and Governance at the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University. Furukawazono is currently the leader of Survival Language Project. He studies the thought of Christopher Alexander, the father of Pattern Languages. Takashi Iba is an associate professor at the Faculty of Policy Management at Keio University, Japan. He received a Ph.D. in Media and Governance from Keio University in 2003. Collaborating with his students, Dr. Iba created many pattern languages concerning human actions. He authored Learning Patterns (2014), Presentation Patterns (2014), and Collaboration Patterns (2014). Survival Language A Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes Tomoki Furukawazono & Takashi Iba with Survival Language Project CreativeShiftSurvivalLanguage-APatternLanguageforSurvivingEarthquakes Tomoki Furukawazono, Takashi Iba with Survival Language Project, Survival Language: A Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes, CreativeShift, 2015 Survival Language A Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes Tomoki Furukawazono, Shota Seshimo, Daiki Muramatsu, and Takashi Iba, “Survival Language: A Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes,” Proceedings of the 20th Conference on Pattern Languages of Program (PLoP2013), 2013 Tomoki Furukawazono, Shota Seshimo, Daiki Muramatsu, and Takashi Iba, "Designing a Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes," 4th International Conference on Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs), 2013 Survival S urvival Designing Preparation Designing Emergency Action Designing Life After Quake Survival Language Project ilab-survival@sfc.keio.ac.jp Daily Use of Reserves 1981 Line Evacuation before Firefighting Armadillo Pose Cover and Hold on Life over Furniture Kick Signal Shrine Shelter Evacuation Initiator Pattern Gift
  94. 94. In the 21st century, complex social challenges, widespread inter-connectedness, and changes in economies, environ- ments, and technologies require more than traditional civic knowledge from the body politic. As such problems are intertwined, it has been impossible for larger forces, such as governments or international organizations, to address them with linear approaches. Rather than waiting for solutions and actions from larger forces, it seems more efficient that all citizens be dedicated to address an issue related to themselves. To nurture their problem-solving skills for implementing changes regarding social issues, it is essential to empower the future generation to become “Changemakers” — individ- uals committed to solving local or worldwide problems by leveraging their strengths and creativity. Social entrepreneurship has been a trend in the last decade, attracting many youth to voice their concerns about social issues. However, there is still a huge gap between those upfront social entrepreneurs and the citizens, the latter of whom struggle to find a good starting point or feel over- whelmed by the complexity of the problems. Change Making Patterns captures the essentials that future actors can consult to create their ideal change. The 31 distinc- tive patterns show how social entrepreneurs identify social issues and create or implement solutions to overcome these issues. This set of tacit knowledge is disclosed for you to not only learn how social entrepreneurship is executed in difficult situations but also start your own changemaking project. We believe that social change begins with personal transformation, which can be achieved by individuals who want to challenge the status quo regardless of age, national- ity, or gender. We hope that Change Making Patterns will help you ignite your agency for change in creating a better world. Change Making Patterns A Pattern Language for Fostering Social Entrepreneurship Eri Shimomukai Sumire Nakamura with Takashi Iba CreativeShiftChangeMakingPatterns-APatternLanguageforFosteringSocialEntrepreneurship Eri Shimomukai, Sumire Nakamura with Takashi Iba, Change Making Patterns: A Pattern Language for Fostering Social Entrepreneurship, CreativeShift, 2015 Change Making Patterns Eri Shimomukai, Sumire Nakamura, and Takashi Iba, “Social Entrepreneurship Patterns: A Pattern Language for Change- Making on Social Issues,” Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (EuroPLoP2012), 2012 Eri Shimomukai, Sumire Nakamura, and Takashi Iba, "Change Making Patterns: A Pattern Language for Fostering Social Entrepreneurship," Proceedings of the 19th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2012), 2012 Sumire Nakamura, Eri Shimomukai, Taichi Isaku, and Takashi Iba, "Change Making Patterns Workbook: A Workbook Approach to Patterns Applications," Proceedings of the 21st Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2014), 2014
  95. 95. • Education (Iba, et al., 2011; Iba & Utsunomiya, 2017) • Learning (Iba, et al., 2009; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Collaboration (Iba, et al., 2013; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Presentation (Iba, et al., 2012; Iba & Iba Lab, 2014) • Reading (Iba, et al., 2018) • Open Dialogue (Iba et al., 2017; Iba & Nagai, 2018) • Motivating Self-Improvement (Burgoyne &Iba, 2017) • Life Transition (Iba & Kubo, 2017) • Project Design (Kubota et al., 2016; Iba et al., 2017) • School Design (Iba et al., 2015) • Workshop Design (Iba, 2012; Akado et al., 2015) • Middle Leader for Child Care (Nozawa, et al., 2018) • Omotenashi (Hospitality) (Iba & Nakagawa, 2019) • Cooking (Akado et al., 2016; Yoshikawa et al., 2018; Isaku & Iba, 2016) • Managing Everyday Life with Working and Parenting (Ogo et al., 2017) • Living Lively and Beautiful (Arao et al., 2012) • Natural Living - Ethical Lifestyle (Kamada et al., 2016) • Living well with Dementia (Iba & Okada, 2015; Iba, et al., 2016) • Social Entrepreneurship (Shimomukai, et al., 2012; Shimomukai, et al., 2015) • Cross-Border Leadership (Miura, et al., 2016) • Public Policy Design (Iba & Takenaka, 2017) • Surviving Earthquakes (Furukawazono et al., 2013; Furukawazono & Iba, 2015) • Conservation of Ecosystem (Kamada et al., 2018) + about 400 meta-patterns We have created 60 pattern languages in various domain including 1,600 patterns for past 10 years.
  96. 96. Pattern Mining Pattern Symbolizing Pattern Writing Pattern Language Creation Drawing a Map Grasping the Mined Elements Group Thinking Finding Overlaps Environment for Focusing Element Comprehension Element Pairing Talking while Moving Expanding Hunches Iterative Questioning Active Inquiry Discovering the Islands Mapping IslandsExperience Mining Strategy for Discoveries Searching through Conversing Collecting Clues Grasping the Process Own Gut Feeling Mining Atmosphere One Section at a Time Chain Conversations Inducing Talks Quantity over Quality Qualitative Memory Idea Deposit Digging for the Seeds of Patterns Label Making Structure Building The C-P-S Island Decoding Recallable Labels Finishing the Labels The Whole and the Parts Pincer Structuring Position Confirmation Writer Assignment CPS Writing Finishing the CPS Inquiry by Writing Materials for Inquiring Meticulous Deepening Persistence to Improve Grasp the Source Personal Parallels Leaving Footprints Searching Around Deep Diving Take a Step Back Going Beyond the Individual Spiral Growth Enduring Curiosity Expressions that Move People Insightful Persuasive Empathetic Push on the Back Grasping the Problem New Perspective Finding the Essence Sentence Tweaking Finishing it as Literature Reader's Context Evolving Feelings Words to be Shared Building a View of the World Weaving the Whole A Different World Media to Create the Future Creating Coherence Top-Down Gazing Making Connections Drawingan IdealTrustable Vision Author's Sense Making Change Common Language Proposing new Aesthetics Creating Words Expressing the Essence Words for Daily Use Symbol of the Future Essence Behind the Sentence New Words Inquiry for the Perfect Expression Imaginable Words Memorable Words Adaptable Words Atmosphere of the Word Easy First Step Capture the World Image Drawing A Symbolic Piece Paint a World Breathe Life From the Whole to the Parts Line of Expression Intuitive Comprehension Image Depth Stand in the Scene Natural Expressions Natural Cuteness Be in their Shoes Creating Excitement Editing Literature Grabbing Hook Qualitative Depth User-Friendly Layout Meaning Refinement Emotional Pull-in Poetic Softness Wide Range Order of Development Borrowing Quality Layout with Contrast Cushion Space Natural Flow Meta-Patterns A Pattern Language for Creating Pattern Languages Takashi Iba, Taichi Isaku, “Creating a Pattern Language for Creating Pattern Languages: 364 Patterns for Pattern Mining, Writing, and Symbolizing,” 23rd Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP2016), 2016
  97. 97. Evolution of Pattern Language
  98. 98. Pattern Languages empower people to create things they desire to create, and enables them to participate in creative activities in various domains.
  99. 99. If more pattern languages are created in various domains, it will become much easier for people to try engaging in creative activities in domains which they are not familiar with. In this sense, Pattern Languages can be considered as a soft social infrastructure.
  100. 100. From the creativity viewpoint, it can be said that this ability to step into various creative activities is a new kind of `freedom’. It can be said that pattern language is a tool to enhance people’s creative ‘freedom’.
  101. 101. COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020
  102. 102. COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020 I asked myself what I, as a researcher and educator, could do.
  103. 103. COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020 I asked myself what I, as a researcher and educator, could do. I realized that the things I have found, learned, and produced in my research, our pattern languages, may be helpful to a lot of people facing difficulties due to the situation with COVID-19.
  104. 104. This project began as a serialization on my blog in Japanese
  105. 105. The book will be published in Japanese at the end of September, 2020 井庭 崇, 『コロナの時代の暮らしのヒント』, 晶文社, 2020年9月出版 Hints for Better Living in the COVID-19 Situation
  106. 106. The paper will be presented at PLoP2020 conference, October, 2020
  107. 107. Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation I have picked a number of patterns out of many pattern languages made in various domains that I believe will be of help to peoples’ lifestyles in this current situation, and have translated them to introduce in this context. Quality of Life in the situation with COVID-19
  108. 108. Pattern Language Remix Schuler, D. (2015) "Pattern Languages for Public Problem-Solving: Cultivating New Seeds for Social Change," Baumgartner, P. and Sickinger, R. (eds.) PURPLSOC. The Workshop 2014: Designing Lively Scenarios With the Pattern Approach of Christopher Alexander, PURPLSOC, Berlin: epubli.
  109. 109. Pattern Language Remix Grundschober, I., Ghoneim, A., Baumgartner, P., Gruber-Muecke, T. (2018) "A Pattern Language Remix for ATS2020: Using Existing Pedagogical Patterns to Create a New Language for Formative Assessment within the ATS2020 Learning Model," Sickinger, R., Baumgartner, P., Gruber-Mücke, T. (eds.), Pursuit of Pattern Languages for Societal Change: A Comprehensive Perspective of Current Pattern Research and Practice, PURPLSOC, Krems * ATS2020 … EU project “Assessment of Transversal Skills”
  110. 110. Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation I have picked a number of patterns out of many pattern languages made in various domains that I believe will be of help to peoples’ lifestyles in this current situation, and have translated them to introduce in this context. Quality of Life in the situation with COVID-19
  111. 111. Domain Translation When doing a remix, the situation that should apply differs from that of the original domain, so it is necessary to do a domain translation. • First, the context must be re-written to match the domain of the remix. • The problem will be almost the same as the original except for some small modifications to account for the changed context. • The forces as well will only need small modifications to account for the context. • Generally, the solution should be exactly the same. The solution is able to stay exactly the same despite the situation being different because the solution is written quite abstractly and so does not require any modifications. • Actions, on the other hand, often have to be replaced with examples that go along with the domain of the remix, although there are cases when they can be used exactly as they are. Finally, consequences, like the context, must be re-written to match the domain of the remix.
  112. 112. The book will be published in Japanese at the end of September, 2020 The paper will be presented at PLoP2020 conference, October, 2020
  113. 113. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 32 Hints for Better Living in the COVID-19 Situation I translated 58 patterns from 16 different pattern languages of various domains to 32 hints
  114. 114. 1. Think of these different from usual days as A NEW JOURNEY and make them into wonderful and memorable ones. In this situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been forced into a lifestyle out of our norm and unable to do things that we want to. Just being upset at the situation will not change anything, however. Therefore, think of this significant lifestyle change as the start of “a new journey." Things are different from usual in a journey, and there will be some inconvenient differences as well. However, a journey can be an extraordinarily amazing, or even an unforgettable, experience. How this journey goes is up to ourselves. By seeing this different lifestyle as a journey, you will realize that rather than being lost time, this is time for you to gain and create things which you could not have otherwise. A New Journey It is a new journey of living well with dementia. 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000 A NEW JOURNEY pattern is taken from Words for a Journey (Iba, Kaneko, et al., 2016; Iba, Matsumoto, et al., 2016; Iba and Okada, 2015).
  115. 115. 2. FOCUS AND SIMPLIFY to prevent yourself from building up stress. As you continue to work from home or the time your children spend at home increases, it is difficult to keep things as precise as before. In such a situation, the more you tell yourself that you want to be more organized or neat, the more stress you will build. This may even lead you to start blaming and hating yourself. Therefore, it is important to focus on the important tasks you accomplished, even if it meant having to put off other tasks for later. For example, even if a lot of dirty dishes are piled up, think instead that you are glad you were able to play with your kids a lot. By having this mindset, you can end each day by doing your best without overworking yourself. Focus and Simplify Don t try too hard. It s important to be practical about your time. FOCUS AND SIMPLIFY pattern is taken from Ways of Everyday World-Making (Ogo, Iba, et al., 2018).
  116. 116. 2. Through a DAILY USE OF RESERVES, build a pantry with nothing past the expiration date. According to the spread of the pandemic, the supply of food may be temporarily stopped or it may be difficult to go shopping, so it is safe to have a certain amount of emergency food supplies stocked in your home. However, realizing that the expiration date has long passed when looking at your stockpile for the first time in a while is a common occurrence. Therefore, continue to replenish preserved foods that are the same as your emergency stockpile as you use them from the old ones first. If you divide your preserved foods pantry shelves according to the expiration date, it will be easier to understand because you can start eating from the top shelf, which has the earliest expiration date. DAILY USE OF RESERVES pattern is taken from Survival Language (Furukawazono, Seshimo, et al., 2013; Furukawazono, Iba, et al., 2015) Survival Language is a pattern language to support survival when a catastrophic earthquake occurs. The basis of this proposal comes from the problem that although countries like Japan have experienced numerous catastrophic earthquakes, avoidable tragedies continue to be repeated because knowledge about disaster risk reduction has not been disseminated effectively. Survival Language is focused specifically at the individual level. It is true that there are many levels of community and governmental support when a catastrophic earthquake occurs. However, such supports are useless if individuals do not survive. It is critical to individual survival to provide techniques for immediate personal implementation when an earthquake occurs. Survival Language seeks to support immediate decisions before, during, and after an earthquake strikes, and to recall earthquake safety measures even in ordinary moments of daily life. Tomoki Furukawazono is a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Media and Governance at Keio University. He is a senior visiting researcher of Keio Research Institute of SFC. He earned a Master of Media and Governance at the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University. Furukawazono is currently the leader of Survival Language Project. He studies the thought of Christopher Alexander, the father of Pattern Languages. Takashi Iba is an associate professor at the Faculty of Policy Management at Keio University, Japan. He received a Ph.D. in Media and Governance from Keio University in 2003. Collaborating with his students, Dr. Iba created many pattern languages concerning human actions. He authored Learning Patterns (2014), Presentation Patterns (2014), and Collaboration Patterns (2014). Survival Language A Pattern Language for Surviving Earthquakes Tomoki Furukawazono & Takashi Iba with Survival Language Project CreativeShiftSurvivalLanguage-APatternLanguageforSurvivingEarthquakes Daily Use of Reserves
  117. 117. 5. Be the supporting role in your children’s’ education so they can be an ACTIVE LEARNER. In this situation, there are most likely more and more instances of having to teach something to your children at home. You may work so hard to do so that it feels as though you are teaching and just making your child follow along. If a relationship becomes that of a teacher who teaches and a student who just takes in what is taught, the child becomes passive and loses independence, and the feeling that they are being forced becomes stronger. Therefore, properly communicate that the child is the protagonist of their education, and that you are a supporting role who helps them, and make sure to actually support them as such. Then, the child’s independence will gradually develop, and they will be able to think and move for themselves. ACTIVE LEARNER pattern is taken from Active Learning Patterns for Teachers (Iba and Utsunomiya, 2018). Active learner
  118. 118. 7. Make your own PERSONAL BOOKSHELF at home filled with everything that excites you. It may be a little difficult to spend a long time and relax in a bookstore this year. Therefore, buy the books that you want to read or that interest you, and put them into your own bookshelf at home. A bookshelf created in this way should be the most exciting bookshelf in the world for yourself. Then, you can gaze at the books from in front of the bookshelf, read them from there, and just enjoy it. A bookshelf created in this way will be the one and only place that has your own view of the world. You can change the way you interact with books simply by creating a place for them, and you will be able to enjoy gazing at and reading the books. PERSONAL BOOKSHELF pattern is taken from Life with Reading (Iba, Burgoyne, et al., 2018; Nitta, Murakami, et al., 2018) Personal Bookshelf
  119. 119. 8. When teaching your family something, make them start as a COPYCAT LEARNER. You may have to teach your child how to study or teach someone in your family how to do a certain chore when splitting them up. In such a case, show them how to do it by doing it yourself and have them start by imitating you. Lev Vygotsky, the “Mozart of Psychology” who researched and studied learning, revealed that people only learn in a zone where they can be taught and supported (Zone of Proximal Development). This applies not only to children's learning, but also to adults. When teaching family how to cook or do a certain chore, it will not go well if you just leave it up to them from the beginning. Actually, show them how to do it so they can copy you and do it themselves. By doing this, they will be able to continue on to learn through their experience. COPYCAT LEARNER pattern is taken from Learning Patterns (Iba, Miyake, et al., 2009; Iba and Miyake, 2010; Iba and Sakamoto, 2011; Iba and Iba Lab., 2014a). Copycat Learner Begin by imitating the master.
  120. 120. 9. Build an AMUSEMENT COMMITTEE to create and carry out fun plans! In the current situation with the pandemic, it is difficult to travel, go drinking with friends, or just go out to have fun in general. In such a situation, it is common to get bored and into a rut doing only the same things with the same people. Therefore, because of the sort of situation we are in, create fun projects that will add color to everyday life while involving various people. By making an exciting project with your family, relatives, friends, etc., your feelings will become more positive and you can have a lot of fun. Additionally, by planning together, you can feel a sense of unity. In this way, let us create our own wonderful time within this situation and enjoy it to its fullest. 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000 A NEW JOURNEY pattern is taken from Words for a Journey (Iba, Kaneko, et al., 2016; Iba, Matsumoto, et al., 2016; Iba and Okada, 2015). Amusement Committee A fun event with family living far away.
  121. 121. 線上 火 焚き火Zoom You will find sharing an image of a bonfire and watching it while talking as if you were camping to be a unique and impressive experience. If you search on YouTube, you can find the image of the bonfire, and by sharing a screen with this video on Zoom or another platform, you can relax and talk with each other while listening to the crackling sound of the fire. Online Bonfire
  122. 122. 11. Build a FARM AT HOME to have a lifestyle that has a connection with nature. Whether it is going to the beach, going to the mountains, or playing in the river, spending time in nature cleanses your feelings and makes you feel through yourself that humans are also part of nature. However, this year, it may be difficult to go to places with such significant nature. Therefore, realize that you can have a small part of nature close to you that you can spend time with. You can grow vegetables in a garden or on the porch and connect with nature through them. Growing them with your children is also a great opportunity for sharing education on food and agriculture and helping them create a relationship with nature. Growing various kinds of vegetables in parallel is recommended, because then you can enjoy various changes every day. FARM AT HOME pattern is taken from Cooking Patterns (Akado, Shibata, et al., 2016; Yoshikawa, Akado, et al., 2016; Iba, Yoshikawa, et al., 2020) Shiori Shibata Takashi Iba Yuma AkadoAyaka Yoshikawa Cooking Patterns A Pattern Language for Cooking in Everyday Life Farm at Home Cook with produce straight from your backyard.
  123. 123. 家庭菜園 Growing vegetables in a garden or on the porch
  124. 124. 16. Rather than focusing on things you cannot do in this situation, write a CAN-DO LIST and live positively. Thinking about the risk of infection and refraining from going out, many of the things you could easily do before are not able to be done now. Therefore, prepare a paper and pencil and write down everything that you can do. It is also a good idea to have fun with your family and do this as a sort of family brainstorm. By doing this, you will find that there are still many things you can do. When you realize this, the feeling of being stuck will be alleviated and a positive feeling will be created, and you can actually do what you like. Focusing on what you can do, not what you cannot do, will make the future brighter and more enjoyable. 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000 CAN-DO LIST pattern is taken from Words for a Journey (Iba, Kaneko, et al., 2016; Iba, Matsumoto, et al., 2016; Iba and Okada, 2015). Can-Do List Don t get too depressed by the things you can t do.
  125. 125. Sweets スイーツ 甜點
  126. 126. おつまみSnack Food 下酒菜
  127. 127. 17. Realize that you can understand any strange behavior by looking at their EXPERIENCED WORLD from an INNER VIEWPOINT. The current situation is unusual and stressful for everyone. A family member saying something offensive that they did not even think about you, not being able to chat calmly with colleagues or friends, or even children acting selfish or emotional are all way that people around you may be mentally upset or weakened, and it may be happening with those around you. In such a case, talk with them and imagine what they may be going through to get an inner viewpoint of the ‘world’ they are living in, and try to understand how their feelings or thoughts came about. Through such a deep understanding, you can build an even better relationship with family and friends. EXPERIENCED WORLD pattern and INNER VIEWPOINT pattern are taken from Words for a Dialogue (Iba, Nagai, et al., 2017; Nagai, Asano, et al., 2017; Iba and Nagai, 2020). Experienced World Feel the world in which they are living. Inner Viewpoint Immerse yourself into the world in which they are living.
  128. 128. 21. Make sure to TAKE ONE BREATH OUT and give an ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF EFFORTS when any of your family members make a mistake or fail. Your family may split the housework, or have you help them (or vice versa). In such a case, what you can do well on your own may lead to failure or mistakes when someone not familiar with it does it. If a family member makes mistakes or fails at something and you respond or point out their mistakes while frustration, it can lead to an argument and worsen your relationships. Therefore, first, take a deep breath, calm down, and only react after doing so to prevent yourself from sharing negative feelings. That way, the other person can learn from their mistakes and grow without having to shut you out or lose confidence. TAKE ONE BREATH OUT pattern and ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF EFFORTS pattern are taken from Words for Nurturing a Community (Iba, Akita, et al., 2019; 2020). Acknowledgement of Efforts Remember that you walked through the same way. Take One Breath Out Keep the learning environment calm and filled with warmness.
  129. 129. 25. Consider if what JOB-SPECIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS you can do and move to do your PART TO CONTRIBUTE. In the midst of this great change due to the spread of the pandemic, people are facing various difficulties. In new situations, new challenges, worries and problems emerge. Therefore, think about how the current world and people could possible contribute from your work and specialty, and move to realize this. If you look from the point of view of your work or specialty, you will find many ways that you can help the situation. In that way, it would be good everyone gradually does what they are good at and what they can do in order to create a society where we can help each other. JOB-SPECIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS pattern is taken from Words for a Journey (Iba, Kaneko, et al., 2016; Iba, Matsumoto, et al., 2016; Iba and Okada, 2015), and PART TO CONTRIBUTE pattern is taken from Collaboration Patterns (Iba and Isaku, 2013; Iba and Iba Lab., 2014c). Part to Contribute What would the team lose without you? Job-Specific Contributions What can I do to help? 7348457813129 ISBN 978-1-312-73484-5 90000
  130. 130. 31. Go about POLISHING SENSES at home by discussing what you feel while looking over pictures and paintings to discover your IMPORTANT VALUES. People develop their sensibility through various experiences. However, going out somewhere now is difficult considering the risk of infection while traveling or at your destination. Therefore, make ideas on how to polish your sensitivity while staying at home. For example, search keywords such as ‘beautiful rainbows,’ ‘beautiful dresses,’ ‘breath-taking views,’ ‘cute pandas,’ etc., choose pictures that you particularly liked, and make time to explain why you liked them. An artistic dialogue where you discuss one specific painting or sculpture can be helpful as well. In this way, even at home, you can touch experience various things and develop your sensibility. POLISHING SENSES pattern is taken from Collaboration Patterns (Iba and Isaku, 2013; Iba and Iba Lab., 2014c), and IMPORTANT VALUES pattern is taken from Life Transition Patterns (Iba and Kubo, 2018). Important ValuesPolishing Senses Appreciate rich and qualitative work.
  131. 131. Search keywords such as ‘beautiful rainbows,’ ‘beautiful dresses,’ ‘breath-taking views,’ ‘cute pandas,’ etc., choose pictures that you particularly liked, and make time to explain why you liked them.
  132. 132. 32. Do what you can so that this experience can become PLEASANT MEMORIES for you and your loved ones and you can one day reminisce on it. We are continuing to live in a special situation that is quite different from what we are used to. This is a new everyday life and today, this week, this month, and this year are all significant parts of our lives. Therefore, it is important to make pleasant memories in this lifestyle that you and your loved ones can look back on with a nostalgic smile in the future. Create a lifestyle so that when you look back on this time, you will remember the long time you spent having fun with and taking with your family just as much as you remember the difficulties. By doing this, you will be able to say that, rather than a weird blur that disturbed your life, this time was an irreplaceable part of your life. PLEASANT MEMORIES pattern is taken from Project Design Patterns (Kubota, Harashima, et al., 2016; Iba, Mori, et al., 2019; Iba and Kajiwara, 2019). Pleasant Memories Go beyond baseline satisfaction.
  133. 133. Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation Quality of Life in the situation with COVID-19 When doing a pattern language remix, one is not just making a new combination of patterns. Rather, one is incorporating sets of pattern and the quality without a name that each original pattern language is aiming for.
  134. 134. Pattern Language Remix & Domain Translation • In this case with the current COVID-19 pandemic, many people are working and receiving an education from home, so things that were previously done at workplaces and schools are done at home and people are spending more time at home. • Because of this, there is a growing need to think of learning, projects, management, and ways of living with family at home. • For this case, existing patterns that relate to these such things are searched. • It was checked to see if the quality without a name in each original domain would be suitable if realized in this situation and chose the patterns which were suitable. Quality of Life in the situation with COVID-19
  135. 135. The book will be published in Japanese at the end of September, 2020 The paper will be presented at PLoP2020 conference, October, 2020 Support for Living Better Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages An Attempt at Pattern Translation to Another Domain and Pattern Language Remix
  136. 136. Project Members of Iba Lab, Keio University & CreativeShift, Inc. English Translation by Aimi Burgoyne
  137. 137. Illustrated by Kaori Harasawa 2020 Scenes
  138. 138. Evolution of Pattern Language
  139. 139. Further Evolution of Pattern Language
  140. 140. John Dewey, “Creative democracy: The task before us”, 1939 John Dewey (1859 – 1952) In J. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925-1953, volume 14, Carbondale:Southern Illinois University Press, pp. 224-230 John Dewey claimed that sharing the development of habit through experience should be at the core of democracy, and called form of democracy, “Creative Democracy”. • Richard J. Bernstein, “Creative democracy—the task still before us”, American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 21 (3):215 - 228, 2000 • Shigeki Uno, Minshushugi no Tsukurikata [How to build Democracy], in Japanese, Chikuma Shobo, 2013 ‘Creative Democracy’
  141. 141. Keynote at AsianPLoP2020 Ph.D in Media and Governance Professor at Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University President of CreativeShift, Inc. Support for Living Better 
 Throughout the COVID-19 Situation with Pattern Languages Takashi Iba An Attempt at Pattern Translation to Another Domain and Pattern Language Remix

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