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Hr roles in Creating Corporate Culture

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Hr roles in Creating Corporate Culture

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“I think as a company, if you can get those two things right — having a clear direction on what you are trying to do and bringing in great people who can execute on the stuff — then you can do pretty well.”
– Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook

“I think as a company, if you can get those two things right — having a clear direction on what you are trying to do and bringing in great people who can execute on the stuff — then you can do pretty well.”
– Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook

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Hr roles in Creating Corporate Culture

  1. 1. HR ROLES in Corporate Culture www.humanikaconsulting.com
  2. 2. Corporate Culture • Culture is the environment that surrounds us all the time. • A workplace culture is the shared values, belief systems, attitudes and the set of assumptions that people in a workplace share. • This is shaped by individual upbringing, social and cultural context. • In a workplace, however, the leadership and the strategic organizational directions and management influence the workplace culture to a huge extent.
  3. 3. Research Talk • Research by Deloitte has shown that 94% of executives and 88% of employees believe a distinct corporate culture is important to a business’ success. • Deloitte’s survey also found that 76% of these employees believed that a "clearly defined business strategy" helped create a positive culture.
  4. 4. A Company’s Culture Is A Direct Result Of Its Leadership • the CEO is the one who sets the tone, for better or worse, for the rest of the company. • How the person at the top behaves and interacts often funnels down through the rest of the team. • If organizational leadership has a very passive-aggressive style of managing, for example, that passive-aggressive attitude will permeate throughout the entire corporate culture.
  5. 5. Why Is Organizational Culture • Culture impacts everything from performance to how your company is perceived in the media. • Organizational culture is hugely important to the success and overall health of your company, your people, and your customers. • So it’s helpful to spend time considering why your company’s culture is the way it is, and why it’s important that it stays that way (or changes). • A positive workplace culture improves teamwork, raises the morale, increases productivity and efficiency, and enhances retention of the workforce. Job satisfaction, collaboration, and work performance are all enhanced. • And, most importantly, a positive workplace environment reduces stress in employees.
  6. 6. 1. It defines your company’s internal and external identity • Peter Ashworth explains that your organizational culture “defines for you and for all others, how your organization does business, how your organization interacts with one another and how the team interacts with the outside world, specifically your customers, employees, partners, suppliers, media and all other stakeholders.” • In other words, your organizational culture will reverberate across all aspects of your business because it represents the way you do business. It’s simultaneously your identity and your image, which means it determines how your people and customers perceive you.
  7. 7. 2. Organizational culture is about living your company’s core values • Your culture can be a reflection (or a betrayal) of your company’s core values. The ways in which you conduct business, manage workflow, interact as a team, and treat your customers all add up to an experience that should represent who you are as an organization and how you believe a company should be run. In short, your culture is the sum of your company’s beliefs in action. • But if your espoused values don’t match your culture, that’s a problem. It could mean that your “core values” are a list of meaningless buzzwords, and your people know it. • A strong organizational culture keeps your company’s core values front and center in all aspects of its day-to-day operations and organizational structure. The value of doing so is incalculable.
  8. 8. 3. Your culture can transform employees into advocates (or critics) • One of the greatest advantages of a strong organizational culture is that it has the power to turn employees into advocates. • Your people want more than a steady paycheck and good benefits; they want to feel like what they do matters. And when your people feel like they matter, they’re more likely to become culture advocates—that is, people who not only contribute to your organization’s culture, but also promote it and live it internally and externally. • How do you achieve this? One way is to recognize good work. A culture that celebrates individual and team successes, that gives credit when credit is due, is a culture that offers a sense of accomplishment. And that’s one way to turn employees into advocates. • Then again, if your company culture doesn’t do this, you may be inviting criticism.
  9. 9. 4. A Strong Organizational Culture Helps You Keep Your Best People • Ask any top performer what keeps them at their company and you’re bound to hear this answer: • the people. It’s because a workplace culture focused on people has profound appeal. • It helps improve engagement, deliver a unique employee experience, and makes your people feel more connected. • One way to attract top performers that are natural culture champions is to hire for cultural fit.
  10. 10. 5. A well- functioning culture assists with onboarding • Writing in Forbes, George Bradt explains further: “People fail in new jobs because of poor fit, poor delivery or poor adjustment to changes down the road. Assuming you’ve aligned the organization around the need for your new employees and acquired them in the right way, your onboarding program should accommodate their needs (so they can do real work), assimilate them into the organization (so they fit culturally) and accelerate their progress (so they can deliver and adjust).” • Organizational culture also has the potential to act as an aligning force at your company. • The culture at your organization is essentially a guiding force for them, so it’s important that it starts with onboarding.
  11. 11. 6. Your culture transforms your company into a team • A successful organizational culture brings together the people at your company and keeps them aligned. When your culture is clear, different perspectives can gather behind it with common purpose. The culture at your organization sets expectations for how people behave and work together, and how well they function as a team. • In this way, culture can break down the boundaries between siloed teams, guide decision-making, and improve workflow overall.
  12. 12. 7. Culture impacts performance and employee wellbeing • Paul Barrett sums it up nicely, writing that “Employee wellbeing strategies have the potential to bring huge benefits to employees and employers alike but they need to be introduced in the right way for the right reasons, and at the right time. • To be properly effective they need to be developed in a holistic way, consistent with a business culture that is conducive to their success. • That means supportive management behaviours, flexible working options and an open culture that allows employees a voice and some say in shaping the working environment.”
  13. 13. How can organizations create a positive workplace culture?
  14. 14. 1. Establish Clear Ethos And Values For The Organization. • It is important to have a set of clear organizational core values that are communicated effectively and discussed with the employees so that they feel part of it. • It is the commitment that an organization or a company makes to certain policies and actions, such as "going green" or "social change". It is not enough to state this in the mission statement, brand story or in marketing and promotional material. • It is crucial that demonstrable actions are taken regularly so that the employees feel an individual and personal responsibility towards these values. • This will ensure that they can evaluate their own attitudes towards these positive core values, and take pride in them. • Positive attitudes and positive actions make for a positive workplace culture.
  15. 15. 2. Foster Collaboration And Communication • Leadership and management style that encourages teamwork, open and honest communication is vital to creating a positive feeling in the workplace. • Open and honest communication also means that regular audits are taken to evaluate how people are interacting with each other, feedback is welcomed and taken on board, and opportunities for social interaction are enabled. • These can include coffee mornings, team getaways and family weekends. • This gives an opportunity for team members to nurture and foster connections outside of work. • Continued learning opportunities enabling team members to assess their inherent unconscious and implicit biases that can impact their interactions with other employees are crucial. • Also, strict no tolerance open door policies and complaint procedure for workplace bullying is crucial for creating a positive collaborative environment.
  16. 16. 3. Create An Inclusive Work Environment • A positive workplace is one where all the employees are valued, supported and nurtured irrespective of gender, sexual orientation or color. • All employees should have equal opportunities to progress and equal access to all the perks and rewards on offer. • An inclusive workplace is one that values individual differences in the workforce and makes them feel welcome and accepted. Include signage that supports inclusivity, is clear and positive. • Language can create confusion and miscommunication. Careful use of language that reinforces the gender-conscious and inclusive ethos, such as that emphasizing the function of space rather than the gender identity of users is important.
  17. 17. 4. Create Clear Goals And Rewards For The Employees • The survey by Deloitte showed that 83% of executives and 84% of employees rank having engaged and motivated employees as the top factor that substantially contributes to a company’s success. • Motivated and engaged employees can be created if they are treated equally and have clear goals that they can work towards. • Having a transparent policy for progression and promotion offers the staff an opportunity to measure their performance. • Measurable performance indicators will mean that there would be healthy competition, but this kind of honest policy statement would help avoid negative feelings and resentment amongst the team members towards each other. • When goals are positively reinforced, and achievements are recognized and celebrated, it leads to employees feeling valued which in turn creates a positive feeling in the workplace.
  18. 18. HR Roles in Create Positive Culture • And while corporate culture is influenced by organization members, HR plays a pivotal role in setting a company’s cultural tone. • An employee’s first point of contact when brought onboard is often the HR department. • As a business function, HR shapes and reinforces how employees define corporate culture. The role HR plays in defining a company’s culture can have an effect on its long- term business success.
  19. 19. 1. PROVIDING FEEDBACK • Deploy engagement and feedback tools • Employees use HR to voice concerns and opinions. • Leaders employ HR to issue directives and policies. • And HR connects through strategic assessments to effectively engage with team members. • Clarify the company’s mission statement and core values. • Consistent collaborative feedback conveys corporate culture and better aligns conversations between organization members.
  20. 20. 2. ADDRESSING DIVERSITY • Different demographics and cultures must work together to achieve long-term business success. • HR must take a prominent role in providing positive leadership. • A mentorship program promotes team spirit, ensuring current values resonate with all generations and demographics.
  21. 21. 3. SUPPORTING BUSINESS ADVOCACY • The attraction and retention of top talent. • Shaping corporate culture so potential candidates are culturally a good fit for the organization. • HR shapes corporate culture through the literature it publishes. • Advocacy starts with publications that include job descriptions, performance appraisals, and employee development and training. • These publications give potential candidates a glimpse into a company’s structure and workplace culture. • Current values are emphasized through these publications and allow the HR department to serve as culture champions for an organization.
  22. 22. 4. BECOMING CHANGE AGENTS • Technological innovation, globalization, and information access are some examples of changes occurring across the business landscape. • These changes occur rapidly and can have a dizzying effect on a workplace’s culture, particularly if these initiatives are not delivered in a timely manner. • Businesses with the ability to respond to these rapid changes are better poised to become global leaders in their marketplace. • HR’s responsibility as change agents is to ensure that such changes do not negatively impact workplace culture.
  23. 23. ALIGNING HR WITH CORPORATE CULTURE • company culture must be a significant focus. • Company culture can be a defining point for an organization. • It is a deliverable that garners interest from prospective candidates and top talent.
  24. 24. It is impossible to manufacture or change culture overnight • HR plays a key role in driving the culture of the company. • HR can ensure the company understands employee concerns and act on them by conducting an ongoing feedback loop via engagement surveys or focus groups to give employees the chance to voice their opinions. • Once this feedback is collected, HR can help to ensure unity across the leadership team, coaching those at the top and making them aware of negative behaviors and how these impact the company as a whole. • In addition to encouraging leaders to drive the necessary changes, it is also HR’s responsibility to impact culture by working to remove those who are poor leaders and bringing in people who align with the company’s current or desired culture. • As culture continues to be a key determining factor in a company’s ability to attract new talent and retain its current employees, HR departments are under increasing pressure to manage and foster their company’s cultures. • While HR might not always have the power to change the culture outright, it does have the ability to influence leadership to steer the culture in the right direction and nurture an environment where employees enjoy coming to work and performing their jobs.
  25. 25. Conclusion • These are just a smattering of reasons why organizational culture is important, but they’re a good starting point to get you thinking about what your own organization brings to the table. • What’s important at your company might be totally different depending on the situation. • HR plays a fundamental role in emphasizing company culture both internally and externally. • An HR department that empowers workplace culture will drive organizational excellence and success. • By playing its role as a culture champion, change agent, and business advocate, HR can shape processes, increase employee contribution, and enrich an organization’s value.
  26. 26. Learning and Giving for Better Indonesia www.humanikaconsulting.com

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