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Copy of Fall2014SyllabusLincoln

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  1. 1. 1 Rhode Island School of Design Department of Architecture Fall, 2014 Jamie Graham Women and Architecture Syllabus Course Description Iterative process is a method of thinking and making that is often used in the Architecture and Design field. Working through an idea in multiple stages can help guide a project from the beginning stages of conceptual ideas, all the way to the final construction documents. This course is designed to introduce a different method of thinking and making, through the use of iterative design. This type of studying will allow a progression of thoughts and ideas to manifest themselves in the work. As we begin to learn this unique process of development, it is important to realize that this type of learning is a cyclical process of trial and error. The end of the course will produce a small scale design project that embodies a design typology, made known by a specific female architect. The main goal of the class will be to study how females design and build occupiable spaces, but we’ll also examine if we perceive spaces differently based on our gender. Format The format of the class will vary from week to week, but will most often include a lecture, demonstration, in-class assignment, and homework that will be examined at the beginning of each class period. The demonstrations will be during the beginning of the course, and are meant to introduce basic drawing and model making techniques. We will also periodically be visiting other architecture studios in the building, in order to see the progression of work in a collegiate setting. The final review will take place in the gallery of the BEB, parents and faculty of both schools will be there to look at the work. Resources http://sketchingarchitecture.blogspot.it/ Aims Introduce the terrain of architecture, through the study of methods, procedures, and iteration. Discover how this method of working can help you convey information and present a clear idea. This process will teach you how to successfully represent an idea in a precise architectural manner. Integrate existing familiarities with the world around you to create a space that you would find comfortable or pleasant to inhabit. Enable students to begin integrating their own interests in design or drawing. Allow the exploration of new methods and materials to engage students in a dialogue of representation. Foster an environment that encourages students to work in a different method than they’re used to. Critically engage students in their own work to allow the development of a visual language. Encourage the dialogue between students and each others work to learn from each others experiences. Objectives 1. Demonstrate understanding and application of the information taught in class. Homework will be assigned to exhibit these techniques. (30%)
  2. 2. 2 2. Advanced final project that demonstrates your ability to think through a problem architecturally. (45%) 3. Independent research in the form of a sketchbook. This may be ideas for your projects thought and drawn out, or time spent throughout the work week sketching the environment around you. (20%) 4. Attendance and participation in classes and critiques (5%) 5. Build a range of tools that will continue to develop, even after the class has ended. Develop the ability to utilize these tools in a helpful and constructive manner. Contact jgraham@risd.edu Information Class Policies Assessment My goal is for each student to learn new ways of working through ideas, by working through them iteratively. This means that each assignment should be expanded upon for the next homework assignment. I expect your work to reflect a level of technical ability, but that ability must be met with a deep consideration for your ideas and what you are trying to convey to an audience. Homework Assignments – 30% Final Assignment - 45% Sketchbook – 20% Class Participation – 5% Critique All students are expected to engage during group critiques. Constructive dialogue and thoughtful responses to others work, as well as a generous sharing of your own ideas/concerns in the work you present is an important component of this class. Much of the learning that will take place in this class will ultimately occur between students, as your classmates also have a lot to contribute. I will also be regularly talking to each of you individually at your desks about the work you’re completing. I expect you to have furthered your projects in the time between class sessions, so critiques are meaningful and allow a progression of your work to develop. Grading A = Excellent. The work demonstrates complete understanding of the project requirements and a highly developed understanding of the course material. The project solution is complex, developed in great detail, and graphically presented with precision and conciseness. B = Good. The work demonstrates above average understanding of the project requirements and a clear understanding of the course material. The project solution is of sufficient complexity, fully developed, and graphically well presented. C = Average. The work demonstrates an average understanding of the project requirements and course material. The project solution is of average
  3. 3. 3 complexity, sufficiently developed, and graphically well presented. D = Poor. The work demonstrates a poor understanding of the project requirements and a vague understanding of course material. The project solution is of insufficient complexity, undeveloped, and graphically poorly presented. F = Unacceptable. The work demonstrates no understanding of the project requirements and course material. The solution is incomplete and graphically presented in an unsatisfactory manner. A project or examination that has not been completed and submitted will constitute a failing grade. Attendance Late Project and Assignment Submission Policy: Grades for required projects and assignments will be lowered a full grade for each class they are late. A failing grade will be given for the course if all projects and assignments are not submitted. Absence Policy: Grades will be lowered half a grade for each unexcused absence. Excused absences are permitted only if an explanation is provided before class begins, by email or in writing. Per RISD policy, a student who has unexcused absences from the first class meeting or any two or more class meetings will be removed from the course by the Registrar
  4. 4. 4 Schedule Week 1: [Wednesday, October 1] Introduction to the Syllabus, Students, and Teachers -Who is taking this class? Why? What object describes me the best? -Who is teaching this class? Why? -What will we be doing? Lecture | Define Iterative Architecture | Stage 1 - Sketching -What will I be doing this semester? -Why is it important to sketch? In-class assignment | Take a stab at sketching – BEB - Sketch places or spaces you find interesting -Be prepared to explain why - How does the space around us begin to inform our design? Homework | Find a space you often occupy. Home, school, work, etc. Try to describe how this space makes you feel through a series of sketches. Sketching in this way allows us to start a dialogue between those who drew the sketch, and those who are trying to interpret it. These sketches don’t have to be the most perfect drawings, but they should start to convey an idea. Be prepared to show these in the beginning of next class. -Does this space make me feel comfortable? Inspired? Confined? Etc. Learning objectives for Week 1: Discuss students interest in Architecture Introduce the basic method of sketching Identify the importance of sketching ideas _______________________________________________________________________ Week 2: [Wednesday, October 8] Review of Homework | Each student will talk about their sketches. We will ask questions that should encourage a dialogue about how we think about the areas we usually inhabit. Lecture | Drawing operations and procedures -What are plans, sections, and elevations? Drawing Demonstration | How do I use these tools? In-class assignment | Cut through objects -Learning to make the basic architectural drawings will allow students to think through the building or structure in a different way than they’re used to. -Walk around the first year studio Homework | Go back to the space you drew for last weeks homework. Use any information you can get to draw a plan and section of the space/building. Much of this information might be from your own ideas of how big the room is in comparision to spaces around it, or other ways of informally measuring. Doing a measured drawing will get students more familiar with the rigid method of drawing that architecture usually requires. -How can I figure out what the room would look like in a section? Learning objectives for Week 2: Introduce the mechanics of basic Architectural drawing skills Discuss the importance of drawing to learn something new
  5. 5. 5 Week 3: [Wednesday, October 15] Review of Homework | Does the new way of describing a space help us to see what it looks like more clearly? What are the differences in the method of drawing? Is one more helpful than the other? Lecture | How do people interact with small-scale public spaces? In-class assignment | Visit the site; analyze how it is currently being used. -Use the same skills you learned from the previous homework assignment, how does the area encourage a type of behavior? -What small-scale program could this site benefit from? -Who visits the site most often? How does the public reach it? Are there bus stops nearby? What is the weather like in the area? -Laptop maintenance, bike storage/repair, newspaper stand, etc. -Walk around the Urban Design Principles Studio Homework | Research your chosen program. -Create 3-5 sketches explaining why that program was chosen. -These sketches should also be related to ideas of how the space should function, as well as feel to the users. Learning objectives for Week 3: Introduce Assignment 1 Identify the methods of site analysis _______________________________________________________________________ Week 4: [Wednesday, October 22] Review of Homework | Each students program should be clearly thought out, and should encourage a conversation about the impact of such a program on an area. The students should help each other realize certain positive or negative effects of the program. Lecture | Women in Architecture In-class assignment | Walk to the RISD library -Each student will pick from a list of female architects. Research will be done to find out more about their careers and styles of design. This research isn’t meant to learn simple biographical information, but to examine their methodology of design. -Walk around the advanced studios Homework | Start to sketch ideas about how to incorporate some of the key formal design decisions from your earlier research. These designs should also be thought about in relation to the program that you have chosen. Be prepared to present your findings and sketches to the class. Learning objectives for Week 4: Discuss final project Advance methods for sketching and drawing architecture _______________________________________________________________________
  6. 6. 6 Week 5: [Wednesday, November 5] Review of Homework | The research about each architect should be clearly presented to the other students. We should ask questions about their designs and methods of building, rather than a biography. As a group it will be helpful to give each other feedback on integration of design into their program. Lecture | Architectural Models In-class assignment | Introduction to Model Making - How do I use these tools? - Sketch models are also an important part of design. Each student will make at least one during class that continues to develop their final project. - Begin translating your sketches and design ideas into drafted drawings. Your program analysis should also start to be incorporated into the design. -Walk around the Landscape Studios Homework | Homework from now on will be different for each student, depending on the development of their project. Learning objectives for Week 5: Formulate a final design Week 6: [Wednesday, November 12] In-class assignment | Small group pin-ups -Students will be able to critique each others work in a helpful and constructive manner. -Other women from the department will be joining us to discuss the students projects -Other students will be working on the final project while the others are in the crit Learning objectives for Week 5: Encourage development of final design _______________________________________________________________________ Week 7: [Wednesday, November 19] Individual Meetings Work on final project Learning objectives for Week 5: Discuss any potential problems for the upcoming break and final critique _______________________________________________________________________ Week 8: [Wednesday, November 26] No class- Thanksgiving Break _______________________________________________________________________
  7. 7. 7 Week 9: [Wednesday, December 3] Final Presentations Critique objectives: Our last critique will include a group of outside critics in the Architecture field. The faculty of both the Rhode Island School of Design and Lincoln Schools will also be in attendance. The purpose of our last meeting will be to reflect on what we’ve learned through the course, and to invite others to participate in the conversation Material List: Straight edge Scale Drafting lead holder Lead 2h hb 2b Eraser Lead pointer Exacto knife Blades Small cutting mat Sketchbook – nice, small, good quality Accordion Folder (Something to carry everything back and forth) Blue Painters tape (Masking tape) Scissors Glue stick Markers Pencils

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