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Notes on the Future - ILI2015 Workshop

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Slides (currently unannotated) to support the "Preparing for the Future: Technological Challenges and Beyond" workshop presented with Brian Kelly - http://ukwebfocus.com/events/ili-2015-preparing-for-the-future/

Note - slideshare seems to have messed up the conversion - some slides are (unintentionally) blank....

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Notes on the Future - ILI2015 Workshop

  1. 1. Tony Hirst Computing and Communications, The Open University, UK @psychemedia / blog.ouseful.info Notes on the Future #ILI2015
  2. 2. W2 - Preparing for the Future: Technological Challenges and Beyond 10.00 – 17.00 Brian Kelly, Cetis, University of Bolton Tony Hirst, Department of Communication and Systems, The Open University Despite the uncertainties faced by librarians and information professionals, technology continues to develop at breakneck speed offering many new opportunities for the sector. At the same time, technological developments can be distracting and may result in wasted time and effort. This workshop will help participants identify potentially relevant technological developments by learning about and making use of processes for spotting and prioritising signals which may indicate early use of technologies of future importance. Having identified potentially important technological developments, organisations then need to decide how to respond. What will be the impact on existing technologies? What are the strategic implications and what are the implications for staff within the organisation? This interactive workshop will provide opportunities to address the challenges in understanding the implications of technological developments and making appropriate organisational interventions.
  3. 3. “Know Thyself” γνῶθι σεαυτόν
  4. 4. “Famously Ryle imagined a visitor who has seen the colleges, departments, and libraries of a university but still wonders where the university is. The visitor fails to realize that the university consists of these organizational units. In this paper I ask what exactly the relation is between institutional entities such as universities and the entities they are composed of.”
  5. 5. "But where – or indeed, what – is the Library?” - with apologies to Gilbert Ryle
  6. 6. Public Library School Library Academic Library Legal / Medical Library Company Library Gov’t Dept / Int’l Agency Library
  7. 7. “So what is the Library?” - with even more apologies to Gilbert Ryle ACTIVITY What is a library? What is the library for? What makes the library the library?
  8. 8. Values A place to learn new skills or techniques Curated resources/ collections / archive Access Gateway to other resources Physical space Conceptual models What is a library? Access to information What is a library for? Is the library a place or an idea? "But where is the University?" Publisher What makes the library the library? Archive
  9. 9. Infoskills: looking things up by numbers…
  10. 10. USPTO 20150124107 BS 5605 or BS 6371 ISBN 075381093X 978-0753810934 823.7 SCO JOH E06000046
  11. 11. Cross-Indexing& Cross-Referencing
  12. 12. “Perceive what You have heard” Ακουσας νοει
  13. 13. We perceive the future in the context of the present and the consequences of the past
  14. 14. planning for the future planning the future
  15. 15. “Plans are of little importance, but planning is essential.” -- Winston Churchill “In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.” -- Dwight Eisenhower
  16. 16. If we’re planning for the future of the library, then what is this library thing we’re planning for?
  17. 17. Do your planning tools allow you to accommodate the future?
  18. 18. Where are we now? Where do we want to be? Strategic No clear strategy about where we want to be with A Clear understanding of strategy around A Impact We don’t know what impact Library Services has on B Clear understanding of impact of the things we do relating to B Integration Library controlled C is held in library silos and not available to other internal analysts or users Library controlled C is available as needed throughout the organisation using standard tools Skills Limited skills in dealing with D Core of library staff with trained in D. Capacity to do D. Infrastructure Some legacy underlying infrastructure in place to support E, but services fragmented using non- standard interfaces. No organisation wide UI. Interoperable, shared services associated with E using open standards. User interface available Business as usual Consideration of F not embedded into practice or business as usual. Not part of culture Decisions and processes that take into account F are part of standard practice
  19. 19. Where are we now? THE FUTURE Where do we want to be? Strategic No clear strategy about where we want to be with A Clear understanding of strategy around A Impact We don’t know what impact Library Services has on B Clear understanding of impact of the things we do relating to B Integration Library controlled C is held in library silos and not available to other internal analysts or users Library controlled C is available as needed throughout the organisation using standard tools Skills Limited skills in dealing with D Core of library staff with trained in D. Capacity to do D. Infrastruct ure Some legacy underlying infrastructure in place to support E, but services fragmented using non- standard interfaces. No organisation wide UI. Interoperable, shared services associated with E using open standards. User interface available Business as usual Consideration of F not embedded into practice or business as usual. Not part of culture Decisions and processes that take into account F are part of standard practice
  20. 20. “Psychicdefences”
  21. 21. How does your organisation frame itself for the future?
  22. 22. Core ideology - core values - core purpose Envisioned future - long term goals - vivid description “Companies that enjoy enduring success have core values and a core purpose that remain fixed while their business strategies and practices endlessly adapt to a changing world.” James Collins & Jerry Porras Building your company vision Harvard Business Review, Sept-Oct 1996, pp. 65-77
  23. 23. “Core values are the essential and enduring tenets of an organization. A small set of timeless guiding principles, core values require no external justification; they have intrinsic value and importance to those inside the organization.” Core ideology “the enduring character of an organization - a consistent identity that transcends product or market life cycles, technological breakthroughs, management fads, and individual leaders. “Core purpose, the second part of core ideology, is the organization's reason for being. An effective purpose reflects people's idealistic motivations for doing the company's work.” “Whereas you might achieve a goal or complete a strategy, you cannot fulfill a purpose” “Core ideology needs to he meaningful and inspirational only to people inside the organization; it need not be exciting to outsiders.” “don't confuse core ideology with the concept of core competence. Core competence is a strategic concept that defines your organization's capabilities - what you are particularly good at – whereas core ideology captures what you stand for and why you exist.”
  24. 24. “One powerful method for getting at purpose is the five whys. Start with the descriptive statement: We make X products or We deliver X services, and then ask, Why is that important? five times. After a few whys, you'll find that you're getting down to the fundamental purpose of the organization.”
  25. 25. The “second primary component of the vision framework is envisioned future. It consists of two parts: a 10-to-30-year audacious goal plus vivid descriptions of what it will be like to achieve the goal” “BHAGs (pronounced Companies need an audacious 10-to-30-year goal to progress toward an envisioned future. BEE-hags and shorthand for Big, Hairy, Audacious Goals” Vivid Description. “In addition to vision-level BHAGs, an envisioned future needs what we call vivid description - that is, a vibrant, engaging, and specific description of what it will be like to achieve the BHAG. Think of it as translating the vision from words into pictures, of creating an image that people can carry around in their heads. It is a question of painting a picture with your words. Picture painting is essential for making the 10-to-30- year BHAG tangible in people's minds.” “A BHAG is a clearly articulated goal. Gore purpose can never be completed, whereas the BHAG is reachable in 10 to 30 years.”
  26. 26. “Foresee the future” Ορα το μελλον
  27. 27. What are the changes that will make a difference? “This workshop will help participants identify potentially relevant technological developments …”
  28. 28. -Legislation -Market moves -(Technological innovation) The big changes in technology may not be down just to “the technology”… They are also OUTSIDE OF YOUR CONTROL…
  29. 29. Market Moves
  30. 30. What is about technology that changes…? …and does it matter?
  31. 31. - Will the predominant service model, security model or user models change? - Will the underlying business models change? - Will the underlying technological platforms change? - Will the actual applications change? “What will be the impact on existing technologies? What are the strategic implications and what are the implications for staff within the organisation?”
  32. 32. What changes are relevant? - ones that make a service you currently provide obsolete - ones that can’t be integrated or accommodated within your current organisational structure - ones that require you to start providing a particular sort of service or replacement service - ones that will require skills or capacity you cannot currently provide
  33. 33. Stop doing something you currently do Start doing something you currently don’t Start doing something that’s completely new to everyone STEP CHANGES
  34. 34. Step gradually?
  35. 35. “Act when you know” Γνους πραττε
  36. 36. Noticing the future that’s unevenly distributed about you…
  37. 37. “There must be a better way…”
  38. 38. “So does that mean I could…”
  39. 39. What did you see for the first time today? Could it affect your library?
  40. 40. Two more things to consider when noticing the future…
  41. 41. What if X becomes commoditised?
  42. 42. What’s the adoption path…?
  43. 43. “Have respect For suppliants” Ικετας αιδου
  44. 44. End user development End user expectations End-user adoption / BYOD Listen to the User…?
  45. 45. “What is the Library for?”
  46. 46. The Library plays an important role in the knowledge ecosystem… …so what can learn by looking at failures in that system?
  47. 47. “Educate your sons” Υιους παιδευε
  48. 48. Open Notebooks & Reproducible (“Replicable”) Research
  49. 49. CodeOutput
  50. 50. CodeOutput
  51. 51. CodeOutput
  52. 52. Data Futures
  53. 53. Jian Qin and John D'Ignazio, "Lessons learned from a two-year experience in science data literacy education" ( June 22, 2010). International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries, 31st Annual Conference. Paper 5. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/iatul2010/conf/day2/5 The Library as Training Unit
  54. 54. “Do not tire of learning” Μανθανων μη καμνε
  55. 55. To what extent does technology adoption and/or changes to the information environment drive the need for skills development?
  56. 56. Information skill, digital skill, or data skill? Boolean search SQLRegular Expressions
  57. 57. Internal services requirements External users Provided services External users Internal skills requirements Skills requirements associated with service delivery to users Skills requirements associated with skills teaching / training
  58. 58. Data Curation (RDM) Data Resourcing (subject/reference librarian) Data Reporting (internal audit/analytics) Data Sensemaking (“data literacy”/infoskills)
  59. 59. “Be a seeker Of wisdom” Φιλοσοφος γινου
  60. 60. Helping people “find” information in a generative sense – from data? If digital skills (digital literacy) - in the sense of skills that support the organisation and production of information using digital tools – are in scope for the library, then are data skills (data literacy) - in the sense of skills associated with organising and producing (and making sense of) information from data also in scope?
  61. 61. Trending now…
  62. 62. Increasing “open”ness
  63. 63. open to everyone open access journal and open data discovery open textbook and OER shelves open (scholarly) infrastructure invisible library support open digital workbenches What would an open access library look like?
  64. 64. Conversational Interfaces
  65. 65. From link-clicking to conversational UIs?
  66. 66. Seemless updates
  67. 67. When did you last update (as in, upgrade) your operating system? When did you last update your browser? When did you last upgrade your car?
  68. 68. What does it mean if you’ve always got the latest, most up to date version?
  69. 69. Staged vs continuous deployment
  70. 70. One off or ubiquitous? Firmware inside?
  71. 71. Virtual Computing
  72. 72. Student’s computer e.g. Windows VirtualBox Application Guest Operating System e.g. Linux Course software I Course software II Student’s own browser Personal folder Download files from web Access as web/browser application
  73. 73. Identifying Yourself
  74. 74. Tap to pay -> tap to X From fingerprint readers to facial ident…
  75. 75. “It’s Alive…” [Smart X]
  76. 76. Soon-to-be-commodity Computing? Image recognition Automatic language translation “Robot authors” - data2txt OCR Text Analysis – Named Entity Recognition
  77. 77. “Know your opportunity” Καιρον γνωθι
  78. 78. Ahead of the curve or behind the game?
  79. 79. Sharing economy, meh… …but ownership is being replaced by leasing and licensing
  80. 80. “Gig economy” "Th[e] so-called gig economy - the trading of individual tasks and commissions (or “gigs”) online - is associated with the growth of self-employed, freelancers, and micro-entrepreneurs working either full or part time. “The business model of much of the gig economy tends to transfer risk from the digital platform providers to individual consumers and workers.”
  81. 81. Public service trends – from service provision to service commissioning
  82. 82. Brought in scope through legislation
  83. 83. Having ceded ground in terms of discovery to ad hoc aggregation sources such as Google, will legislation reinvigorate discovery using primary sources or through more formal intermediaries?
  84. 84. “Five Laws of Library Science”, rochelle hartman (flickr: tinfoilraccoon)

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