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Become a User Experience Designer in 45 Minutes

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Become a User Experience Designer in 45 Minutes

  1. 1. Become a User Experience Designer in 45 Minutes<br />By Sara Summers<br />
  2. 2. Design can seem like a black art.<br />
  3. 3. The toys, messy desks, strange lingo…<br />
  4. 4. User experience is all around us.<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. User experience can be reduced to one idea:<br />The practice of design that is on behalf of the user in order to bring about purposeful change and meaning. <br />
  7. 7. …I will tell you to sketch, prototype and be a savvy storyteller.Oh and test, test, test.<br />
  8. 8. …I will tell you to sketch, prototype and be a savvy storyteller.Oh and test, test, test.<br />Let’s start with understanding…<br />
  9. 9. It is no longer acceptable to simply serve user’s needs.<br />
  10. 10. People want:delight, discoverability, fun, enchantment, rewards, excitement, connection, goals, direction, participation, generosity, exploration, play, engagement, serendipity, seduction<br />
  11. 11. No problem right?!<br />
  12. 12. TYPICAL REQUIREMENTS LIST- Technology constraints- What we think we want- What someone else told us we need- The internal org legacy decision- What the competitor has- What executive management insists we need<br />
  13. 13. UX takes diverse view points and maps a cohesive direction.<br /><ul><li> Clear
  14. 14. Actionable
  15. 15. Insightful
  16. 16. Humanized Ideas</li></li></ul><li>REQUIREMENTS LIST- Technology constraints- What we think we want- What someone else told us we need- The internal org legacy decision- What the competitor has- What executive management insists we need<br />People’s aspirations say more about what they truly desire than past behavioror what they say they want.<br />
  17. 17. REQUIREMENTS LIST- Technology constraints- What we think we want- What someone else told us we need- The internal org legacy decision- What the competitor has- What executive management insists we need<br />HUMAN<br />People’s aspirations say more about what they truly desire than past behavioror what they say they want.<br />
  18. 18. Psychology<br />
  19. 19. UX Problem 1: <br />We have to have a sign in page<br />
  20. 20. Awesome, I want to play with that…<br />
  21. 21. Ughhhhhhh…<br />
  22. 22. Ok, almost there…<br />
  23. 23. Why is this one better?<br />
  24. 24. You can still see why you are there and it looks like nearly instant reward.<br />
  25. 25. UX Problem 2:<br />Our product has a lot of forms to fill out<br />(either task driven or data collection based)<br />
  26. 26. Typical form layout<br />
  27. 27. *Everything is required<br />
  28. 28. Unclear/ Duplicate info?<br />
  29. 29. Huh, this looks easy…<br />
  30. 30. I can jump right in…<br />
  31. 31. If you either want or need people’s data, make it clear, dead simple and ENJOYABLE.<br />
  32. 32. Web Form Design by Luke Wroblewski<br />
  33. 33. An organized, useable product or application isn’t enough anymore.<br />
  34. 34. UX patterns help people get things done (and have fun doing it).<br />
  35. 35. Experience patterns for people:<br />Task progression:indicators, orientation & engagement<br />Transitions:recognition, reassurance & status<br />Getting things done:directives, online brain & human(ize) error<br />
  36. 36. Task progression: Satisfies and serves user’s goals.<br />indicators<br /> engagement<br />orientation<br />
  37. 37. Transitions: ‘Is this thing on?!’ Calming frustration & fostering delight.<br />recognition<br />status<br />reassurance<br />
  38. 38. Getting things done: Task easing, comfort and memory.<br />directives<br />human(ize) error <br /> online brain<br />
  39. 39. More great patterns here:<br />quince.infragistics.com/<br />
  40. 40. Game Theory<br />
  41. 41. Mashable.com - December 2009<br />
  42. 42. 18 Million<br />69 Million<br />Active, monthly players <br />Mashable.com - December 2009<br />
  43. 43. What is the deal?!<br />
  44. 44. Farmville has the secret sauce:<br />Your real friends…<br />…who you can gift(free!!) <br />Easyand enjoyable to play.<br />Tons ways to connect and customize.<br />
  45. 45. Friends:reciprocity and teamwork required.<br />
  46. 46. Learning:easy start w/ depth for skill and mastery.<br />
  47. 47. Customizable: Zynga listened to user feedback.<br />Don’t want to farm veggies? They made flowers, vineyards, extra livestock.<br />No pets in Farmville? <br />They made dogs.<br />
  48. 48. Games and UX are:<br />“…a series of meaningful choices.”<br />- Sid Meier, Civilization <br />
  49. 49. A good, contagious game has:<br />- Points<br />- Badges<br />- Levels<br />- Status <br />Easy enough…<br />
  50. 50. A good, contagious game has:<br />- Points – Encourage & reinforce good behavior <br />- Badges – Acknowledge completion & participation<br />- Levels – Reward milestones & unlock more stuff <br />- Status – Top User benefits; runs discussions, perks<br />
  51. 51. A good, contagious game has a SOUL.<br />- Relevant –adds to my life<br />- Realistic – fits into my life<br />- Trustworthy – I do good things/makes me better<br />- Intrinsic–Learn, problem solve, help out, desirable<br />
  52. 52. What happens when we don’t reward correctly?<br />People feel deceived, bribed and despise you for it.<br />
  53. 53. Understanding human incentives:Punished by Rewards byAlfie Kohn<br />
  54. 54. Amazing game theory: The Art of Game Design by Jesse Schell<br />
  55. 55. Ubiquity<br />
  56. 56. Ubiquitous computing <br />The term was coined by Mark Weiser, Chief Technologist at Xerox Research, in 1988…<br />…describes human-computer interaction where information processing completely integrated into everyday objects and activities.<br />
  57. 57. Ubiquitous computing <br />Launched research around:<br />- Distributed and mobile computing<br />- User experience and interaction<br />- Content and context awareness<br />
  58. 58. Ubiquitous computing <br />Defines devices that THINK and improve day to day life.<br />
  59. 59. “In this world of ubiquitous computing, where there are different types of information appliances - your car, your watch, your phone - how do these things work together as a society of appliances that exists within a society of people.”<br />- Bill Buxton, on the future of experience design <br />
  60. 60. We have a lot to design and build for…<br />
  61. 61. Tools should enable and drive the content not just the structure or device.<br />
  62. 62.
  63. 63. The tools connect our experiences…so we can focus on context and user goals.<br />
  64. 64. …so you can be experience INNOVATORS<br />

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