Seminario fractura de cadera anciano

2.364 visualizaciones

Publicado el

0 comentarios
0 recomendaciones
Estadísticas
Notas
  • Sé el primero en comentar

  • Sé el primero en recomendar esto

Sin descargas
Visualizaciones
Visualizaciones totales
2.364
En SlideShare
0
De insertados
0
Número de insertados
2
Acciones
Compartido
0
Descargas
94
Comentarios
0
Recomendaciones
0
Insertados 0
No insertados

No hay notas en la diapositiva.
  • In 2007, there were 281,000 hospital admissions for hip fractures among people age 65 and older.2 Over 90% of hip fractures are caused by falling3, most often by falling sideways onto the hip.4 In 1990, researchers estimated that by the year 2040, the number of hip fractures would exceed 500,000.5 However, since 2000, the annual number of hip fractures has remained relatively constant. From 1990 to 2006, hip fracture rates declined significantly in men age 85 and older and in women age 75 and older.6 It is not known what factors are contributing to this trend. In 1991, Medicare costs for hip fractures were estimated to be $2.9 billion.7
  • A large proportion of fall deaths are due to complications following a hip fracture.8 One out of five hip fracture patients dies within a year of their injury.9 Treatment typically includes surgery and hospitalization, usually for about one week2, and is frequently followed by admission to a nursing home and extensive rehabilitation.10 Up to one in four adults who lived independently before their hip fracture remains in a nursing home for at least a year after their injury.11
  • Women sustain three-quarters of all hip fractures.2 White women are much more likely to sustain hip fractures than are African-American or Asian women.12 In both men and women, hip fracture rates increase exponentially with age.13 People 85 and older are 10 to 15 times more likely to sustain hip fractures than are those age 60 to 65.14 Osteoporosis, a disease that makes bones porous, increases a person’s risk of sustaining a hip fracture.15 The National Osteoporosis Foundation estimates that more than 10 million people over age 50 in the U.S. have osteoporosis and another 34 million are at risk for the disease.16
  • Assess the patient’s cognitive ability and capacity to understand the anticipated surgery (see Section I.A, Section I.B, and Appendix I). Screen the patient for depression (see Section I.C). Identify the patient’s risk factors for developing postoperative delirium (see Section I.D). Screen for alcohol and other substance abuse/dependence (see Section I. E). Perform a preoperative cardiac evaluation according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) algorithm for patients undergoing noncardiac surgery (see Section II and Appendix II). Identify the patient’s risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications and implement appropriate strategies for prevention (see Section III). Document functional status and history of falls (see Section IV). Determine baseline frailty score (see Section V and Appendix III). Assess patient’s nutritional status and consider preoperative interventions if the patient is at severe nutritional risk (see Section VI and Appendix IV). Take an accurate and detailed medication history and consider appropriate perioperative adjustments. Monitor for polypharmacy (see Section VII, Appendix V, Appendix VI, and Appendix VII). Determine the patient’s treatment goals and expectations in the context of the possible treatment outcomes (see Section VIII). Determine patient’s family and social support system (see Section VIII). Order appropriate preoperative diagnostic tests focused on elderly patients (see Section IX).
  • Assess the patient’s cognitive ability and capacity to understand the anticipated surgery (see Section I.A, Section I.B, and Appendix I). Screen the patient for depression (see Section I.C). Identify the patient’s risk factors for developing postoperative delirium (see Section I.D). Screen for alcohol and other substance abuse/dependence (see Section I. E). Perform a preoperative cardiac evaluation according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) algorithm for patients undergoing noncardiac surgery (see Section II and Appendix II). Identify the patient’s risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications and implement appropriate strategies for prevention (see Section III). Document functional status and history of falls (see Section IV). Determine baseline frailty score (see Section V and Appendix III). Assess patient’s nutritional status and consider preoperative interventions if the patient is at severe nutritional risk (see Section VI and Appendix IV). Take an accurate and detailed medication history and consider appropriate perioperative adjustments. Monitor for polypharmacy (see Section VII, Appendix V, Appendix VI, and Appendix VII). Determine the patient’s treatment goals and expectations in the context of the possible treatment outcomes (see Section VIII). Determine patient’s family and social support system (see Section VIII). Order appropriate preoperative diagnostic tests focused on elderly patients (see Section IX).
  • Reasonable for all geriatric patients , especially those >80 years.20,21 ^ blood loss is anticipated and may require transfusion.112,113 Recommended for patients with history or physical exam suggesting severe anemia:112,113 History of profound fatigue, anemia, malignancy, cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or respiratory disease. On exam, resting tachycardia or conjunctival pallor. Recommended for all geriatric patients,20,21,112,113 especially those who: Are undergoing a major surgical operation (cardiac, vascular, chest, or abdomen).112,113 Have diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or use medications that affect renal function (ACE inhibitors, NSAIDS). Reasonable for all geriatric patients ,20,21,112 especially those who: Have known liver disease, multiple serious chronic illnesses, and recent major illness. Are undergoing a major surgical operation. Likely have malnutrition. Reasonable for all geriatric patients ,20,21,112 especially those who: Have known liver disease, multiple serious chronic illnesses, and recent major illness. Are undergoing a major surgical operation. Likely have malnutrition. NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening.21,111,112 Recommended for patients with history of bleeding disorders, on medications affecting coagulation (for example, chronic antibiotics), on warfarin, or on hemodialysis.21,111-113 ^ such as arterial reconstruction, cardiac surgery, cancer operations, and ones in which small amounts of bleeding can cause dramatic complications (neurosurgical or orthopedic spine procedures).21,113 PT should be check in patients with malnutrition, malabsorption, or liver disease. NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening.21,111,112 ^" heart failure, those taking diuretics, digoxin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or other medications that increase likelihood of abnormal results.21,112 NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening.111-113 Recommended for patients with known or suspected diabetes, or Obesity112 NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening.21,72,113,123 Recommended for patients undergoing lung resection.21,72,124 For patients not undergoing thoracic surgery, PFTs are recommended for patients who:54,123 Have poorly characterized dyspnea or exercise intolerance and diagnostic uncertainty exists between a cardiac or pulmonary limitation and simple deconditioning. Have obstructive lung disease if it is not clear from the clinical evaluation if patients are at the best possible baseline. ._^.._&&....." for patients undergoing intermediate risk surgical operations with no clinical risk factors and for patients undergoing low risk surgical operations.52 Reasonable for patients with three or more clinical risk factors and poor functional capacity (less than 4 METs) undergoing vascular surgery, or for patients with at least one to two clinical risk factors and poor functional capacity (less than 4 METs) who require intermediate risk or vascular surgery, if it will change management. NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening.111,113,119 Recommended for patients who:113,119 Acute cardiopulmonary disease is suspected on the basis of history and physical examination. This includes patients who smoke or have asthma and COPD. Are older than age 70 with history of stable chronic cardiopulmonary disease and without a recent chest radiograph within the past 6 months. May require an ICU stay, to establish baseline CXR. Are undergoing a major surgical operation, including abdominal, thoracic, cardiac, some esophageal, thyroidectomy, other head and neck, neurosurgery, and lymph node procedures. NOT RECOMMENDED for routine preoperative screening, > asymptomatic.52,112 Recommended for patients who:21,52,112,113 Are undergoing intermediate risk or vascular surgery. Have known ischemic heart disease, previous myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, compensated or prior heart failure, diabetes, renal "$ Evidence for age-based criteria in otherwise healthy individuals is mixed, but likely reasonable if not undergoing low-risk procedure.21,52,111-113,120-122
  • Según el grado de desplazamiento (Garden): es el método más utilizado para clasificar las fracturas subcapitales, ya que permite establecer un pronóstico en cuanto a la consolidación, y correlaciona el grado de desplazamiento de la fractura con la probabilidad de lesión vascular y, por tanto, de necrosis avascular. Tambien puedo decir: que las fracturas del cuello del femur EN ANCIANOS se clasifican en fracturas del cuello en fracturas impactadas y/o no desplazadas (Garden tipos I y II) y fracturas desplazadas (Garden tipos III y IV); esta síntesis es verdaderamente predictiva de complicaciones3.
  • A. Suplementos de calcio: disminuyen el riesgo global de fractura, no se dispone de datos en fractura de cadera sola A. Vitamina D : a dosis de 700-800 mg/día, disminuye la incidencia de caídas y fracturas de cadera y otras fracturas no vertebrales en ancianos ambulatorios e institucionalizados A. Calcio + vitamina D: disminuye la incidencia de fractura de cadera y es una intervención costebeneficio muy favorable A. Ranelato de estroncio en mujeres de <80 años y si hay osteoporosis demostrada, >80 años A. Difosfonatos (alendronato y risendronato) en mujeres menores de 80 años si hay osteoporosis demostrada
  • B. Teriparatida: en un ensayo clínico aumenta la densidad ósea en la columna lumbar y la cadera, con reducción de fracturas vertebrales y no vertebrales en mujeres posmenopáusicas (edad media, 70 años), pero no es concluyente en lugares anatómicos concretos (cadera) D. Calcitonina: ausencia de eficacia en reducción del riesgo de fractura de cadera
  • Atención en el lugar de la caída y traslado al hospital D. Realizar una historia clínica lo más completa posible con referencias a12: — Causa que ha motivado la fractura. — Antecedentes personales. — Fármacos previos. — Examen físico inicial. — Iniciar la administración de analgésicos en el lugar de atención. — Evitar el sondaje urinario. — Trasladar al paciente al hospital lo más rápido posible (menos de 1 h). — Monitorizar las constantes vitales. Atención en el área de urgencias del hospital D. La evaluación en urgencias debe ser lo más completa posible12,13: — Valoración del dolor y administración de analgesia intravenosa, morfina si se precisa, hasta controlar el dolor14. — Valoración cognitiva por la elevada prevalencia de delirium15,16. — Valoración funcional y de la movilidad previa, pronóstica de función y morbilidad17. — Valoración de la comorbilidad previa (pronóstica de mortalidad18) y fármacos previos (evaluación riesgo de caídas19). — Valoración del estado de nutrición e hidratación (alta prevalencia y favorece las úlceras por presión)20. — Valorar el riesgo de úlceras por presión (alta incidencia). — Determinar las constantes vitales (presión arterial, temperatura corporal) y disponer de pulsioximetría21. — Solicitar analítica que incluya hemograma, bioquímica urgente y colinesterasa.
  • A. Prevención de enfermedad tromboembólica. Sin tratamiento profiláctico, el riesgo de enfermedad tromboembólica venosa es elevado (trombosis venosa profunda [TVP], 50%; embolia pulmonar [EP], 1,4-7,5%)24. Se han asociado al elevado riesgo de enfermedad tromboembólica venosa la edad avanzada, el retraso en la cirugía y la anestesia general25-28. Además, prácticamente la totalidad de los pacientes ancianos con fractura de cadera presenta un riesgo elevado de TVP y EP (son factores de alto riesgo, entre otros, la edad avanzada, la fractura de cadera en sí misma, la comorbilidad por ciertas enfermedades, la inmovilidad prolongada y el retraso en la cirugía). La tromboprofilaxis es efectiva al disminuir la TVP y la EP en los pacientes con fractura de cuello del fémur29; sin embargo, un elevado porcentaje de pacientes no recibe la terapia antitrombótica de forma adecuada30. — A. En distintos ensayos clínicos, metaanálisis y revisiones sistemáticas de la literatura médica, se ha demostrado la eficacia del tratamiento con heparina de bajo peso molecular (HBPM) en cirugía ortopédida, a dosis de alto riesgo desde 12 h antes o 6 horas después de la intervención hasta 27-35 días tras el alta (nivel evidencia 1+), siempre que no haya contraindicación31-36. — B. La heparina no fraccionada ha demostrado, en un solo ensayo clínico de baja potencia (a dosis de 5.000 U cada 8 h), en la fractura de cadera, una mayor eficacia que la dalteparina (a dosis de 5.000 U cada 24 h), en la prevención de la TVP medida por venografía34, mientras que otros estudios y revisiones sistemáticas sobre la prevención de la enfermedad tromboembólica venosa en la cirugía han demostrado lo contrario35,36. — A. Un inhibidor de la vitamina K, la warfarina, en un ensayo clínico (INR ajustado de 2,0 a 2,7) que la comparaba con ácido acetilsalicílico, 625 mg/12 h, y ausencia de tratamiento (no frente a placebo), ha demostrado disminuir significativamente la TVP, sin más complicaciones hemorrágicas37 y en un análisis conjunto de este ensayo clínico con otros 2 de baja potencia (profilaxis frente a no profilaxis), la warfarina también ha demostrado disminuir la TVP24. — A. En un metaanálisis con fondiparinux (inhibidor selectivo del factor Xa) de 4 ensayos clínicos, doble ciego, multicéntricos, en pacientes intervenidos por fractura de cadera (prótesis electiva de cadera o de rodilla), a dosis de 2,5 mg, iniciado 6 h después de la intervención, el fondiparinux ha mostrado beneficio respecto a la enoxaparina en la prevención de la tromboembolia venosa (TVP y tromboembolia pulmonar [TEP]), con una reducción de la incidencia, hasta el día 11 tras la cirugía, del 55,2% en todos los tipos de cirugía y en todos los subgrupos. Aunque los tratados con fondiparinux presentaron de forma significativa una mayor frecuencia de hemorragia, la relevancia clínica (muerte, reintervención o hemorragia en órgano crítico) no mostró diferencias (nivel de evidencia 1+)38. Deberán llevarse a cabo más estudios con fondiparinux a medio o largo plazo. — A. El ácido acetilsalicílico a dosis bajas (160 mg/día hasta 35 días después de la intervención) asociada con otros tratamientos preventivos de la enfermedad tromboembólica venosa (incluida la asociación con HBPM), en un potente ensayo clínico, multicéntrico, aleatorizado, controlado con placebo, con 13.356 pacientes, realizado entre 1992 y 1998 en Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Sudáfrica, Suecia e Inglaterra, ha demostrado disminuir la TVP un 29% y el TEP en un 43%. Este efecto se observó también en todos los subgrupos (incluido el que recibió tratamiento con HBPM). No se incrementaron las muertes por causa vascular o no vascular ni por hemorragia. Sí precisó realizar más trasfusiones el grupo que recibió ácido acetilsalicílico respecto al que recibió placebo (6 por 1.000, p = 0,04)39. Sin embargo, en este ensayo clínico, el ácido acetilsalicílico se administraba asociada a otros tratamientos tromprofilácticos en el 74% de los pacientes (HBPM, 26%; heparina no fraccionada, 30%, o medidas de compresión mecánica, 18%). En un metaanálisis de diversos tratamientos preventivos de la enfermedad tromboembólica en la artroplastia electiva de cadera (no en fractura de cadera), el ácido acetilsalicílico demostró disminuir la TVP pero no el TEP40. Por otra parte, se ha demostrado una mayor eficacia en la prevención de TEP por las HBPM respecto a el ácido acetilsalicílico, sin aumentar el riesgo de hemorragia41. En el momento actual, estos resultados hacen recomendar la administración de ácido acetilsalicílico, si no hay contraindicación, a dosis bajas a los pacientes con fractura de cadera, asociada a otros tratamientos preventivos de enfermedad tromboembólica, pero no de forma aislada, hasta 35 días después del ingreso (nivel de evidencia 1+). — A. A los pacientes con contraindicación de anticoagulación o antiagregación se les realizará una compresión mecánica intermitente (nivel de evidencia 1+)32. No hay evidencia de la eficacia de las medias de compresión elástica gradual32. Atención en el lugar de la caída y traslado al hospital D. Realizar una historia clínica lo más completa posible con referencias a12: — Causa que ha motivado la fractura. — Antecedentes personales. — Fármacos previos. — Examen físico inicial. — Iniciar la administración de analgésicos en el lugar de atención. — Evitar el sondaje urinario. — Trasladar al paciente al hospital lo más rápido posible (menos de 1 h). — Monitorizar las constantes vitales. Atención en el área de urgencias del hospital D. La evaluación en urgencias debe ser lo más completa posible12,13: — Valoración del dolor y administración de analgesia intravenosa, morfina si se precisa, hasta controlar el dolor14. — Valoración cognitiva por la elevada prevalencia de delirium15,16. — Valoración funcional y de la movilidad previa, pronóstica de función y morbilidad17. — Valoración de la comorbilidad previa (pronóstica de mortalidad18) y fármacos previos (evaluación riesgo de caídas19). — Valoración del estado de nutrición e hidratación (alta prevalencia y favorece las úlceras por presión)20. — Valorar el riesgo de úlceras por presión (alta incidencia). — Determinar las constantes vitales (presión arterial, temperatura corporal) y disponer de pulsioximetría21. — Solicitar analítica que incluya hemograma, bioquímica urgente y colinesterasa.
  • A. Profilaxis antibiótica. Una revisión sistemática de la literatura médica y un metaanálisis reciente demuestran el beneficio de una única dosis de tratamiento antibiótico profiláctico respecto al placebo94,95, con una disminución de las infecciones de la herida quirúrgica (tanto superficiales como profundas), las infecciones urinarias y las respiratorias. Una dosis única pre o posquirúrgica tiene el mismo resultado que mantener el tratamiento antibiótico por más de 24 h94,95, y se puede administrar una segunda dosis en caso de cirugía de larga duración (> 2 h)95. Por el tipo de infección más frecuente y los microorganismos implicados con mayor frecuencia (Staphylococcus), los antibióticos de elección son las cefalosporinas de primera generación (p. ej., cefazolina); en caso de alergia a penicilinas, deben usarse los glucopéptidos (p. ej., vancomicina).
  • B. Factores pronósticos de mortalidad: edad (más mayores), sexo (varones), mayor comorbilidad crónica, institucionalizados, mayor deterioro funcional por dependencia en actividades de la vida diaria y la marcha B. Marcadores de buen pronóstico en la movilidad y en las actividades de la vida diaria: edad (< 80 años), ASA I-II, comorbilidad baja, tipo de fractura (intertrocantérea), estado funcional previo, menor número de complicaciones postoperatorias, buen soporte familiar y social, datos contradictorios respecto a la demencia C. Factores predictores de tipo de ubicación al alta: mayor riesgo de institucionalización a mayor edad, peor situación funcional previa, estar afectados de demencia, mal soporte social
  • B. Factores pronósticos de mortalidad: edad (más mayores), sexo (varones), mayor comorbilidad crónica, institucionalizados, mayor deterioro funcional por dependencia en actividades de la vida diaria y la marcha B. Marcadores de buen pronóstico en la movilidad y en las actividades de la vida diaria: edad (< 80 años), ASA I-II, comorbilidad baja, tipo de fractura (intertrocantérea), estado funcional previo, menor número de complicaciones postoperatorias, buen soporte familiar y social, datos contradictorios respecto a la demencia C. Factores predictores de tipo de ubicación al alta: mayor riesgo de institucionalización a mayor edad, peor situación funcional previa, estar afectados de demencia, mal soporte social
  • Seminario fractura de cadera anciano

    1. 1. Fractura de cadera en el anciano Sandra Milena Acevedo Rueda MD Residente Medicina Interna UNAB Enero de 2013
    2. 2. Fractura de cadera Las proyecciones indican que el número de fracturas en el mundo aumentará cada año (De 1.66 millones en el 1990 a 6.26 millones en 2050)Osteoporos Int. 1992 Nov;2(6):285-9.
    3. 3. Qué tan grande es el problema? • 2007: 281.000 hospitalizaciones >65ª • 90% caídas • 2.9 billones de dólares 1991Stevens JA. Falls Among Older Adults—Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. In:Falls Free: Promoting a National Falls Prevention Action Plan: Research ReviewPapers. NCOA Center for Healthy Aging, 2005. pp 3–18
    4. 4. Qué desenlaces se asocian a Fx de cadera? • 1 de 5 pacientes con fx de cadera mueren al año • Tratamiento: cirugía, hospitalización, 2 semanas, institucionalización • 1 de 4 pacientes estarán institucionalizados un año posteriorStevens JA. Falls Among Older Adults—Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. In:Falls Free: Promoting a National Falls Prevention Action Plan: Research ReviewPapers. NCOA Center for Healthy Aging, 2005. pp 3–18
    5. 5. Qué desenlaces se asocian a Fx de cadera? • Mujeres : ¾ de todas las facturas de cadera • Raza blanca • Mayores de 85 años, 10-15 veces más propensas • Osteoporosis: 10 millones de personas >50 a en USStevens JA. Falls Among Older Adults—Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. In:Falls Free: Promoting a National Falls Prevention Action Plan: Research ReviewPapers. NCOA Center for Healthy Aging, 2005. pp 3–18
    6. 6. Valoración perioperatoria• Capacidad cognitiva• Depresión• Delirium• Alcohol/abuso sustancias• Evaluación cardíaca perioperatoria• Riesgo complicaciones pulmonares
    7. 7. Valoración perioperatoria• Estado funcional, caídas• Fragilidad• Valoración nutricional• Historia médica, comorbilidades• Polifarmacia• Expectativas paciente• Red de apoyo familiar y social• Estudios adicionales enfocados en paciente anciano
    8. 8. Complicaciones Pulmonares Factores relacionados con el paciente• Edad >60• EPOC• American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) clase II o mayor• Dependencia funcional• Falla cardiaca congestiva• SAHOS• HTP• Tabaquismo• Alteración del sensorio• Sepsis perioperatoria• Perdida de peso>10% en 6 meses• Albumina <3.5 mg/dl• Serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL
    9. 9. Complicaciones Pulmonares Factores relacionados con el procedimiento• Cirugía prolongada >3 hrs• Sitio quirúrgico• Cirugía de urgencia• Anestesia General• Transfusión perioperatoria• Bloqueo neuromuscular residual POP
    10. 10. Fragilidad• Minicog <3• Albumina <3.3 gr/dL• Caídas (1 caída , 6 m),• Hto (<35%).
    11. 11. Fragilidad• Minicog <3• Albumina <3.3 gr/dL• Caídas (1 caída , 6 m),• Hto (<35%)• ADL >15• Charlson >3
    12. 12. Estado nutricional• IMC <18.5 kg/m2• Albúmina <3.0 g/dL (sin evidencia de disfunción hepática o renal)• Pérdida de peso no intencional >10%– 15% en 6 meses
    13. 13. Laboratorios• Hemograma• Función renal• Albúmina sérica• Coagulación• Electrolitos• Glucemia• Uroanálisis• Rx de tórax• EKG• Función pulmonar• Prueba de esfuerzo
    14. 14. Decisiones del paciente• Opciones• Entendimiento• Situación y consecuencias• Razones opciones tratamientoNo verbal New England Journal of Medicine, Vol 357(18), Appelbaum PS. Assessment of patients’ competence to consent to treatment, p1834- 1840, 2007
    15. 15. Fracturas de CaderaFracturas del cuello del fémur
    16. 16. Fx CaderaClasificación de Delbet Fracturas subcapitales: localizadas en la base del núcleo cefálico, es decir, en la unión entre la cabeza y el cuello. Fracturas transcervicales: situadas en la zona central del cuello femoral.Fracturas basicervicales: en la unión del cuello con el macizo trocantéreo.
    17. 17. Fx Cadera Clasificación de GardenGarden I: fractura incompleta.Garden II: fractura completa sindesplazamiento.Garden III: fractura completa condesplazamiento posterior y en varodel núcleo cefálico.Garden IV: fractura completa congran desplazamiento.
    18. 18. Fracturas trocantéricas
    19. 19. Fx Cadera trocantérica1. Fracturas intertrocantéreas: son aquellas en que la línea de fractura discurre entre ambos trocánteres.2. Fracturas pertrocantéreas: la fractura asienta próxima a la línea que une ambos trocánteres.3. Fracturas subtrocantéreas: cuando el trazo de la fractura es distal al trocánter menor.
    20. 20. Fx Cadera trocantéricaClasificación de Boyd y AndersonI. Estable, sin desplazar.II. Intertrocantérea conminuta.III. Conminuta con extensión subtrocantérea.IV. De trazo inverso.
    21. 21. Fx Cadera trocantéricaClasificación de Kile y Gustilo I. Estable con 2 fragmentos sin desplazarII. Estable con 3 fragmentos, uno de ellos en el trocánter menor III. Inestable, 4 fragmentos, desplazado inverso y conminución posteromedial IV. Igual que el tipo III, con extensión subtrocantérea
    22. 22. Factores de riesgo parafractura de cadera
    23. 23. 1. Fx leve, 50 años2. Antecedente familiar3. Tabaquismo activo4. IMC Inmovilidad 4sem, vel. Lenta marcha, Parkinson, Deterioro cognitivo
    24. 24. Criterios de la OMS para el diagnósticode osteoporosisWHO Scientific Group on the Prevention and Management of Osteoporosis. Preventionand management of osteoporosis: report of a WHO scientific group. (WHO technicalreport series; 921). Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; 2000 y 2003.
    25. 25. IndicacionesDensitometría ósea2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    26. 26. FRAX® (Fracture Risk Assessment Tool)Kanis JA, Johnell O, Oden A, Johansson H, McCloskey E. FRAX and the assessment offracture probability in men and women from the UK. Osteoporos Int. 2008;19:385-97.
    27. 27. Kanis JA, Johnell O, Oden A, Johansson H, McCloskey E. FRAX and the assessment offracture probability in men and women from the UK. Osteoporos Int. 2008;19:385-97.
    28. 28. Tratamiento no farmacológico en osteoporosis • Tabaco • Peso • Ejercicio • Caídas • Protectores de cadera2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    29. 29. Tratamiento farmacológico en osteoporosis A. Suplementos de calcio B. Vitamina D: a dosis de 700-800 mg/día, disminuye la incidencia de caídas y fracturas de cadera y otras fracturas no vertebrales en ancianos ambulatorios e institucionalizados C. Calcio + vitamina D2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    30. 30. Tratamiento farmacológico en osteoporosis A. Ranelato de estroncio B.Difosfonatos (alendronato y risendronato) B. Teriparatide D. Calcitonina2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    31. 31. Factores de riesgo decaídas e intervenciones
    32. 32. Hipotensión ortostática2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    33. 33. Uso de benzodiazepinas2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    34. 34. El paciente toma más de 4 medicamentos2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    35. 35. Dificultad en transferencias2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    36. 36. Entorno con riesgo y peligro de caídas2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    37. 37. Existen trastornos de la marcha2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    38. 38. Deterioro fuerza muscular ó balance articular2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    39. 39. Deterioro de la visión2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    40. 40. Dependencia para las actividades de la vida diaria2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    41. 41. Deterioro cognitivo2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    42. 42. Atención a la fractura de cadera 1. Urgencia y emergencia: abarca la atención desde el momento de la caída hasta la intervención quirúrgica. 2. Tratamiento quirúrgico: las distintas técnicas quirúrgicas en los distintos tipos de fractura. Incluye los aspectos relativos a la anestesia. 3. Tratamiento médico: en la planta de hospitalización. 4. Tratamiento rehabilitador. 5. Prevención de la fractura de cadera.2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    43. 43. Urgencia LaEn el lugar multidisciplinaria por geriatría • atención de la caída • al paciente con urgencias de cadera, de En el traslado a fracturaforma el área de urgencias del hospital • En protocolizada produce beneficios en la reducción del tiempo de espera de lacirugía, la estancia media y la mortalidad a • Radiografía de Cadera – 4% 30 normal(nivel de evidencia 1+) los es días2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    44. 44. Urgencia • En el área de urgencias del hospital: – Profilaxis tromboembolica - 1 mes – Compresión mecánica intermitente – Tracción NO! – Prevención ulceras por presión – LEV – Sondaje vesical – Ingreso temprano (2h)2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    45. 45. Tratamiento quirúrgico • Tipos de cirugía • Anestesia (raquídea vs general)La cirugía temprana en lasanestesia – Anticoagulación, antiagregación y primeras 24-36 h, incluyendo el fin de Menor mortalidad semana, se recomienda en la Menor TVP Movilidad más temprana mayoría de los pacientes. Menor incidencia de delirium Menos hipoxemia inicial (hasta las 6 h postintervención) Menos hipotensión2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    46. 46. Nutritional status and short-term outcome of hip arthroplasty• 86% trauma y 30% electiva: MALNUTRICIÓN• Más hombres que mujeres tienen niveles subóptimos de albumina (28% vs. 8%, p=0.033) y recuento de linfocitos (82% vs. 31%, p<0.001)• Mayores de 75 años : mayor estancia hospitalaria (67% vs 31%) Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012;20(3):331-5
    47. 47. Nutritional status and short-term outcome ofhip arthroplastyGénero masculino, edad avanzada y trauma fueron los factores de riesgo principales para presentar malnutrición (p<0.001 para todos) Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012;20(3):331-5
    48. 48. Nutritional status and short-term outcome ofhip arthroplastyAlbumina baja y recuento de linfocitos bajo son factores de riesgo para estancia hospitalaria prolongada(p=0.032 y p=0.021, respectivamente) Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012;20(3):331-5
    49. 49. Complicaciones de la Cx • Infección Artroplastia • Luxación POP 3% • Aflojamiento aséptico • Perforación del fémur • Formación de hueso ectópico • Daños neurovasculares2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    50. 50. Complicaciones de la Cx • Pseudoartrosis Osteosíntesis • Consolidación viciosa • Penetración del implante en la articulación • Necrosis avascular • Fracturas por estrés • Fallos del implante2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    51. 51. Tratamiento médico • Profilaxis Antibiótica • Continuidad de tto de enf. previas • Dolor • Electrolitos • Hemoglobina • Oxígeno • Movilización temprana • Extreñimiento • Delirium2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    52. 52. Rehabilitación • Factores pronósticos de mortalidad – Edad, género, comorbilidad, institucionalización, dep. funcional, marcha • Marcador de buen pronóstico en la movilidad y ADL – Edad, ASA, comorbilidad, tipo Fx, estado funcional, complicaciones POP, soporte familiar,2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    53. 53. Rehabilitación • Factores predictores de ubicación al alta – Institucionalización – Estado funcional – Demencia – Mal soporte2007 Anciano afecto de fractura de cadera. Guía de buena práctica clínica en Geriatría. Obra: Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, Sociedad Española de CirugíaOrtopédica y Traumatológica y Elsevier Doyma
    54. 54. Si existen! Gracias …

    ×